•  
Results 1 - 9 of 9

9 Search Results for ""golden pavilion""

  • Golden Pavilion Golden Pavilion

    • From: calcal5551
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 183
    • Not yet rated
  • The Golden Temple The Golden Temple

    • From: knicks
    • Description:

      Kinkaku-ji, Temple of the Golden Pavilion, is a Zen Buddhist temple in Kyoto, Japan

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 142
    • Not yet rated
  • Young Japanese girls at the Go Young Japanese girls at the Golden Pavilion

    • From: joe8211943
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 454
  • Golden Pavilion Reflection, Ja Golden Pavilion Reflection, Japan

    • From: rcrowgey
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 406
  • Kinkaku-ji or Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku-ji or Golden Pavilion, Kyoto, Japan

    • From: bcmelnyk
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 258
  • Independence's Day Weekend in Independence's Day Weekend in Japan

    • From: dni
    • Description:

      For July 4th, Raymond gets 4 and a half days off. Yep, your tax dollars hard at work -- paying for our very patriotic trip to the old capital of another country. List of cities on our agenda this time is Himeji, Kyoto, Nara, and a quick lunch stop in Kobe. Since this trip took place almost 4 months ago, I will do my best to include the details of our trip. Here we go...


      July 1st, Wednesday afternoon, Raymond and I picked up our rental car and headed out of town, but we got lost, and ended up very hungry at a near by shopping center an hour later and decided we'll have dinner first. Now that our stomach is full, we headed up north on the express way.


      Himeji is located in the Hyogo Prefecture, south of Kyoto, and it's one prized treasure is it's Himeji Castle. A UNESCO World Heritage Site, and the best example of a true Japanese Castle. In fact, after seeing this castle, pretty much all other castles seemed less impressive. The castle was built in 1346, but was badly damaged in the 1600s, so it was restored and expanded to the current seven story castle. It is so awesome that when Tom Cruise shot The Last Samurai, it took place here.


      Our first full day, we decided to tackle the castle first. The grounds was like a maze, and as you wind through the maze up hill, you'd eventually reach the magnificent castle. From it's top story, you could see the rest of the Himeji city, surrounded by mountains and ocean. This was a definitely a place to build your castle to defend your ground from invaders. Before you enter the place, you are required to remove your shoes. Then an old Japanese lady hands you a plastic bag to hold your shoes in while you're inside. At the end, you return the plastic bag to another old lady, where she then folds the used bags very neatly into a flat new-looking plastic bags to be reused. Wow, I wonder how much they pay for that job.

      With our Himeji castle tickets, we acquired a combo ticket for the near by Kokoen Garden. The garden was absolutely lovely and huge, and has nine individually themed gardens. We arrived early morning, so there was barely anyone there, except for about 30 employees working diligently on spurning the trees. The place was tranquil and peaceful, we strolled around the garden through its many water falls with giant asian gold fishes.


      Continuing our journey, we headed north to Kyoto, the old capital of Japan prior to WWII. We selected a small Japanese style inn as our home base for the next 3 nights. This was the first time I've ever set foot in a Japanese styled hotel, and boy it is small. If I thought Japanese hotel rooms were small, this was even smaller. The room was sparsely furnished. A small table for tea, a water heater, plenty of tea bags, 2 cups, and mats for sleeping. That pretty much concluded all the things that were in the room.

      We didn't dwell and continued our sightseeing. Our first stop was Fushimi Inari Shrine. Inari is a fox like creature and is represented in shrines as a god. It is also the god of business, so many Japanese company donate money to this shrine. For example each of the torii below is donated by a particular Japanese firm, with the name of the company written on the side of the torii.


      The next day, we decided to visit a few of the famous temples and shrines. First stop Ninnaji, originally built in 886, but was destroyed in 1450s and rebuilt and expanded (sound familiar?) 150 years later. This temple was also the home to a line of imperial lineage, when an emperor retires, he often became a priest/monk, and here would be his home. This tradition carried on from 900 to almost 1900.


      Two of the prized possessions of this temple is its original hand painted screen walls and a beautiful zen garden. Here is where we decided to relax a bit, enjoy some of Japanese mocha (whipped powder green tea) and the view of this peaceful zen garden (reminds me of the last fight between Uma Thurman and Lucy Liu in Kill Bill Vol One).

      Next stop Ryoanji, meaning the Temple of Peaceful Dragon or Peaceful Dragon Temple as the literal translation. All of the names of the temple are written in Kanji or Chinese characters because Chinese language came to Japan along with Buddhism. A lot of the Chinese characters remained in their language, but Japanese also have their own set of alphabets.

      The temple was under construction when we visit, so a lot of the sites were closed off to tourists. However, its most impressive and famous site was not, and that was it's dry zen garden. A dry garden is basically a garden made of small pebbles/rocks, and this one was no different. The small pebbles are raked precisely in a particular direction or another to indicate the flow of water or qi (air). Maybe I lack inner peace to fully appreciate this beautiful garden, but it was kind of a disappointment. AKA, I don't get it.

      Of course, we saved our best sight for last -- Kinkakuji or more famously known as Golden Pavilion Temple. I was very excited to see this temple because this was the place where Ikkyusan studied as an adult zen master. Ikkyusan is a Japanese animation series that aired in China when I was little, and I watched it religiously everyday. So it was pretty cool to see this temple in real life. Plus, it's just a beautiful temple, and it doesn't hurt that the top two layers of this temple is built using pure gold leaves.


      Lunch, finally!!! We decided that we'd go all out and have a nice sit down lunch at somewhere fancy near the Imperial palace, but we ended up lost and walking in the opposite direction before finally finding the place suggested by our guidebook. When we arrived at Mankamero, they were about to shut down for lunch, but thankfully, we made it just in time for them to seat us at a nice, private room, facing their peaceful and lush garden.

      The hostess and waitress were all dressed in traditional kimonos, while they waited on us. Instantly, I felt we were underdressed for this place. There was no menu and no words were spoken, they began by serving us some tea and a fresh cold towel. Then the lady exited the room without ever turning her back on us, and then returned with some cold and fresh sashimi, jelly, and some rice. When she returned, once again no words were exchanged, except her absolute courteous gestures, she took out our emptied tray and immediately brought in more food. A straw basket with many different types of sushi and sashimi beautifully presented with a few maple leaves, a separate bowl of rice with a dash of sesame, and a bowl of miso soup. Once again she exited quietly without turning her back towards us.

      As soon as she left, Raymond and I chowed down the food. The texture of the sushi was wonderful, along with a few other things I can't name. The rice was flavored with sushi vinegar, and the miso soup had pieces of decorative "mystery stuff" in it. Everything tasted and looked so pleasing. I couldn't help but take pictures of EVERYTHING.


      The waitress came back in once more, refilling our sake and water, took out our emptied trays, and then brought back dessert this time. A quarter of grapefruit, but instead of actual grapefruit inside, it was grapefruit jello with a piece of cherry on top. It was just beautifully presented and what a novel idea! Made me want to do that when I get home. After we finished all of our food, we sat there and slowly enjoyed our tea and our view of the garden. It was so peaceful that I could have possible fallen asleep right there on the tatami mats. We signaled to have our bill brought to us, and it was a whopping ¥12000, but it was worth every yenny.

      Day 3, our agenda was to visit the near by city of Nara. It was once a rival with Kyoto as the imperial capital, but after year 800, it fell out of favor. The city is modeled after the capital of China, Xi'an (terra-cotta warriors) during the Tang Dynasty. Today, the city has also fallen out of favor as a tourist destination, but the city is currently promoting and many sites and parking is free - which is unheard of in Japan. Our first destination is Todaiji.


      Todaiji features a gigantic statue of buddha in its main hall. And when I say gigantic, I mean just the face of the buddha is 17.5 feet tall -- so it's gigantic. The rest of the temple ground features lots of intricately carved water fountains, where people can wash up (usually their hands) and cleanse their mouth by drink and spitting out the water from the fountain, and bronze lanterns hung low on the outside of the buildings. There's also a temple at the hill top overlooking the entire temple grounds. A nice place to take a rest and feel the breeze of the air.

      We took our time getting up on the last day of our vacation. Our agenda is to drive to Kobe to get some authentic French food for lunch before driving home leisurely back to Iwakuni. Kobe is a big city where there's a lot of foreigners, foreign architecture, and home to the insanely expensive kobe beef. We arrived in Kobe on a Sunday morning, and the place we had picked out for lunch was fully booked because Kobe is apparently a huge wedding destination for the rich Japanese. So every expensive foreign restaurant was catering a wedding or two. We thought we were out of luck, when we finally found one nice, quietly tucked away French restaurant that had an expensive wine list and good French-Japanese food. Bingo! And with that we concluded our first vacation in Japan.

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 1107
  • Kyoto A Japanese Treasure Kyoto A Japanese Treasure

    • From: sautry
    • Description:

      Kyoto

      A Japanese Treasure

      Spence Autry

      December 7, 2009

       

      It’s ironic that I chose to write a story about Kyoto, Japan on Pearl Harbor Day but there is a link.  Kyoto was the only major Japanese city not bombed during WWII and remains filled with temples, shrines, imperial palaces and traditional wooden homes.  This plus the fact it is the former capital of Japan and it’s easy to understand why Kyoto is the most historically significant city in Japan. With 1,700 Buddhist temples and 300 Shinto shrines, Kyoto deserves to be on everyone’s “must see” list but it’s what’s not on the tourist maps that makes Kyoto special to me. 

      My wife, Susan, and I visited Kyoto in February of 2007 with our son, Brennan, his wife, Stephanie, and their son, Logen.  Brennan was in the navy and stationed at the Yokosuka Navy Base near Tokyo.  It took us about 6 hours to drive to Kyoto but that was affected by frequent stopping with a two year old. 

      We had our list of top sites to visit in Kyoto and on the first morning we headed for Heian Shrine, the most famous shrine in Kyoto.  With its huge orange Torri gate and orange, green and white buildings, Heian Shrine is also one of Kyoto’s most beautiful sites.  As striking as the buildings are it is the gardens that make this shrine outstanding.  Leaving Heian Shrine we stopped at several smaller shrines before arriving at Kiyomizu Temple, Kyoto’s most famous temple.  Built on a prominent spot at the top of Mt Otowa, Kiyomizu Temple’s main hall is a huge wooden structure with a veranda on the edge of the cliff offering spectacular views over Kyoto. 

      Next we visited Nijo Caste, the home of the Tokugawa shogun.  Built in 1603 it stands in stark contrast to the other shogun castles which were constructed purely for defense.  Nijo Castle is made from native cypress and has delicately carved wooden ceilings and painted shoji screens.  But it is a castle and it is surrounded by a moat and high stone walls.  One last line of defense for the shogun was the so called “nightingale floors” that were installed in the corridors leading to the shogun’s bed chambers.  These special floorboards creaked with an almost melodic tone when trod upon and would warn the shogun if anyone was approaching his chambers. 

      Want to take a walking tour?  Then I would recommend the Philosopher’s Walk.  Named for a philosophy professor who walked this route daily in the early 20th century, the path follows a winding canal north from central Kyoto, past 9 temples and shrines before ending at Ginkaku-ji Temple, the Temple of the Silver Pavilion.  Contrary to its name, it is not silver.  Built as a retirement villa by Shogun Ashikaga Yashimasa in 1482, it was to be covered with silver to imitate the Golden Pavilion built by his grandfather.  He died before he could finish his villa but the wooden buildings are still beautiful.  The whole complex is designed to maximize the enjoyment of the tea ceremony, moon viewing and other aesthetic pursuits. 

      For me the most beautiful site in Kyoto is the Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku-ji.  Built as the retirement villa for the shogun, Yoshimitsu, in the late 1300’s it became a temple when he joined the priesthood at age 37. The three story building is completely covered in gold leaf and glistens in the sunlight.  As we approached the temple clouds rolled in and it began snowing lightly.  Soon the clouds cleared and we were treated to bright sun and blue skies. 

      Our last major shine in Kyoto was one of my favorites.  The Fushimi Inari Shine is located on the outskirts of Kyoto in the sake-making district.  Dedicated to Inari, the fox, the deity of rice and sake, it has a much photographed avenue formed by hundreds of Torri gates. 

      As I said, the tourist sites make Kyoto worth a visit but it’s the things not in the guide books that I found most enjoyable.  Things like the small tea houses with just two or three tables serving tea in the traditional way; old wooden houses with small courtyards planted with colorful azaleas and irises being tended by women in printed, silk, kimonos; small, winding, stone streets lined with open-fronted stores selling paper fans, beautiful pottery, colorful writing paper and delicious looking sweets; geishas walking quickly down the narrow streets hurrying to their appointments; and small restaurants where you are led inside by the aroma of traditional Japanese cooking.  Yes, you can find these things in other areas of Japan but nowhere else does it all come together in an exotic blend that says “I am in Japan”.     

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 662
  • Kyoto - A Japanese Treasure Kyoto - A Japanese Treasure

    • From: sautry
    • Description:

      Kyoto

      A Japanese Treasure

      Spence Autry

      December 7, 2009

       

      It’s ironic that I chose to write a story about Kyoto, Japan on Pearl Harbor Day but there is a link.  Kyoto was the only major Japanese city not bombed during WWII and remains filled with temples, shrines, imperial palaces and traditional wooden homes.  This plus the fact it is the former capital of Japan and it’s easy to understand why Kyoto is the most historically significant city in Japan. With 1,700 Buddhist temples and 300 Shinto shrines, Kyoto deserves to be on everyone’s “must see” list but it’s what’s not on the tourist maps that makes Kyoto special to me. 

      My wife, Susan, and I visited Kyoto in February of 2007 with our son, Brennan, his wife, Stephanie, and their son, Logen.  Brennan was in the navy and stationed at the Yokosuka Navy Base near Tokyo.  It took us about 6 hours to drive to Kyoto but that was affected by frequent stopping with a two year old. 

      We had our list of top sites to visit in Kyoto and on the first morning we headed for Heian Shrine, the most famous shrine in Kyoto.  With its huge orange Torri gate and orange, green and white buildings, Heian Shrine is also one of Kyoto’s most beautiful sites.  As striking as the buildings are it is the gardens that make this shrine outstanding.  Leaving Heian Shrine we stopped at several smaller shrines before arriving at Kiyomizu Temple, Kyoto’s most famous temple.  Built on a prominent spot at the top of Mt Otowa, Kiyomizu Temple’s main hall is a huge wooden structure with a veranda on the edge of the cliff offering spectacular views over Kyoto. 

      Next we visited Nijo Caste, the home of the Tokugawa shogun.  Built in 1603 it stands in stark contrast to the other shogun castles which were constructed purely for defense.  Nijo Castle is made from native cypress and has delicately carved wooden ceilings and painted shoji screens.  But it is a castle and it is surrounded by a moat and high stone walls.  One last line of defense for the shogun was the so called “nightingale floors” that were installed in the corridors leading to the shogun’s bed chambers.  These special floorboards creaked with an almost melodic tone when trod upon and would warn the shogun if anyone was approaching his chambers. 

      Want to take a walking tour?  Then I would recommend the Philosopher’s Walk.  Named for a philosophy professor who walked this route daily in the early 20th century, the path follows a winding canal north from central Kyoto, past 9 temples and shrines before ending at Ginkaku-ji Temple, the Temple of the Silver Pavilion.  Contrary to its name, it is not silver.  Built as a retirement villa by Shogun Ashikaga Yashimasa in 1482, it was to be covered with silver to imitate the Golden Pavilion built by his grandfather.  He died before he could finish his villa but the wooden buildings are still beautiful.  The whole complex is designed to maximize the enjoyment of the tea ceremony, moon viewing and other aesthetic pursuits. 

      For me the most beautiful site in Kyoto is the Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku-ji.  Built as the retirement villa for the shogun, Yoshimitsu, in the late 1300’s it became a temple when he joined the priesthood at age 37. The three story building is completely covered in gold leaf and glistens in the sunlight.  As we approached the temple clouds rolled in and it began snowing lightly.  Soon the clouds cleared and we were treated to bright sun and blue skies. 

      Our last major shine in Kyoto was one of my favorites.  The Fushimi Inari Shine is located on the outskirts of Kyoto in the sake-making district.  Dedicated to Inari, the fox, the deity of rice and sake, it has a much photographed avenue formed by hundreds of Torri gates. 

      As I said, the tourist sites make Kyoto worth a visit but it’s the things not in the guide books that I found most enjoyable.  Things like the small tea houses with just two or three tables serving tea in the traditional way; old wooden houses with small courtyards planted with colorful azaleas and irises being tended by women in printed, silk, kimonos; small, winding, stone streets lined with open-fronted stores selling paper fans, beautiful pottery, colorful writing paper and delicious looking sweets; geishas walking quickly down the narrow streets hurrying to their appointments; and small restaurants where you are led inside by the aroma of traditional Japanese cooking.  Yes, you can find these things in other areas of Japan but nowhere else does it all come together in an exotic blend that says “I am in Japan”.     

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 669
  • Golden Pavilion Golden Pavilion

    • From: dni
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 805
Results 1 - 9 of 9

Terms of Service

Check Prices

mock rpx login link