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14 Search Results for ""mt. fuji""

  • view of Mt. Fuji view of Mt. Fuji

    • From: amsher
    • Description:

      view of Mt. Fuji from an airplane

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 272
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  • My fabulous trip in Japan - To My fabulous trip in Japan - Tokyo, Mt. Fuji, Osaka, Kyoto, Hiroshima

    • From: yasmina
    • Description:

      Japan, both in physical size and global power might be seen as the big brother to Korea, but telling that to a Korean is similar to telling a Scotsman he's English. To the average westerner Japan is probably looked upon as similar to Korea and China but besides eating rice the differences are noticeable. 

      Immediately you are struck at the politeness and accommodation of the Japanese people. Throughout our stay in Japan we experienced great hospitality.

      Tokyo, with a population bigger then that of Delhi, Los Angeles and Beijing combined correctly holds it's reputaton as the great and more expensive city in the world. Taxi's start at 700 Yen (£7; $14; 14,000 won), a meal 1000-1200 yen and a pint of beer around 6-800 yen. However the public transport is superb and in the same manner as Korea, on time to the second. Using the subway (whilst confusing at first) is the best way to see the city, allowing you to see the majority of the city in the two day/nights we were there. The city itself is still recovering from the effects of the Tsunami in March 2011 and still regularly experiences minor after-shocks* with a limit placed on electricity usage at night and the extrememly helpful and normally talkative hostel owner noticeably quietening upon myself asking whether or not Tokyo had fully recovered from the events. Despite this, the famous night-life and shopping Shibuya district located in the west of Tokyo was still swarmed with both people and neon lights on a late August Monday night at 11pm. 

      We had rent an apartment on a vacation rentals website in Japan, even If we didn't found apartment in Korea where we decide to go to hotels.Before leaving Korea we had purchased the JR railway pass (Japan Railways)

       

       Pushing speeds of 300km/h, a journey in a bullet train feels a bit like travelling in a plane, both in appearance and time saved. The journey from city to city (Tokyo>Osaka;Osaka>Hiroshima;Hiroshima>Fukuoka)  took just under 2 hours each. 

      Located between Tokyo and Osaka is Mt. Fuji. The weather was overcast at the time but the mountain can be spotted for miles around and on a clear day the mountain can be seen from Tokyo Tower, 60 miles away. The next three days were spent between Osaka and Kyoto, the two cities close by, separated by a 15-minute train journey. Osaka, big in area but not in attractions can be seen as the opposite to Kyoto, small in size but packed with temples and shrines (both originals and restorations). Once the capital of Japan, Kyoto is one of the few Japanese cities to survive WWII relatively intact and due to this remains a favorite city for many tourists to visit. The city is easy to get around, built in an american grid-like system served by air-conditioned buses much needed on what was an extremely hot and humid day.

       

      After spending the last afternoon in Osaka at the traditional, cultural enhancing Universal Studios it was off to Hiroshima, which along with Nagasaki was subject to the effects of an atomic bomb.

       Here was our trip in this so particular country.

       

      Yasmina

       

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 1363
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  • Mt. Fuji, Japan Mt. Fuji, Japan

    • From: joecruz
    • Description:

      Mt. Fuji, Japan

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 253
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  • Mt. Fuji Mt. Fuji

    • From: mmtrinh1223
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 170
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  • The Sun Rises Over Japan - A v The Sun Rises Over Japan - A view from Mt. Fuji

    • From: kjer529
    • Description:

      My husband and I climbed Mt. Fuji this week. We stopped just below the summit (as the summit already had large crowds hovering) to watch the sunrise. It was the most amazing scene I have ever witnessed. the entire mountain came to life with cheers from fellow climbers at all stages of the mountains. There are no words to describe the feeling of that moment. 

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 191
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  • Fujisan Fujisan

    • From: lous22
    • Description:

      An early morning image of Mt. Fuji

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 658
  • Mt. Rainier Sunrise Mt. Rainier Sunrise

    • From: gmagruder
    • Description:

      This photo was taken just before sunrise near the Sunrise visitor center at Mount Rainier National Park Washington. Camera used was a Pentax 6x7 film camera. Film used was Fuji Pro NHG 400 and 45mm Pentax lens. A sturdy tripod was used.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 518
  • C-47 Goony Bird and Mt. Fuji 1 C-47 Goony Bird and Mt. Fuji 1962

    • From: GL Salava
    • Description:

      The sun was about set on a winters day as we were returning from a flight to Korea.  Mt Fuji is in the background.  The C-47 was affectionally know as a "Goony Bird"  It was one of the most reliable workhorses in the Air Force. It was first flown in the mid 1930s and a couple were operational into the 1990s.  I think it was colder inside the aircraft then outside, not fond of the C-47 heater.  Best viewed at the large size.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 522
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  • dni

    • SuperMember
    • Points:46355
    • Views: 2718
    • Since: 6 years ago
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  • Mt. Fuji or Bust -- mostly Bus Mt. Fuji or Bust -- mostly Bust

    • From: skymoose
    • Description:

      For some reason, I thought climbing Mt. Fuji sounded like fun. I finally talked a friend, Toby, into accompanying me after assuring him that the guide books said it was kind of a Japanese pilgrimage and we’d see everything from kids to grandparents doing the climb. How hard could it be? A bottle of wine later, he agreed.

       

      After flying over to Narita and spending the night, we set off the next afternoon for the ride to Mt. Fuji. Unfortunately, it was raining. This should have been an omen.

       

      Mt Fuji 5th StationAt 6pm, we arrived at 5th Station where we were to start the climb. The reason for our late ascent was to catch the sunrise at the top for the mountain after hiking for most of the night and early morning. There are 9 stations to the top at 12,300 feet. The 5th Station is at about 5,000 feet and is the highest drivable point. It had stopped raining, but the top of the mountain was shrouded in clouds. We bought some recommended supplies, including a walking stick (which you get stamped at each station) and cans of oxygen (which I thought sounded kind of fun). Just as were about to start up, our guide announced that a typhoon was coming in faster than expected and we should hike at a “fast clip” as we needed to be back down by early morning, before its arrival. So, up we started.

       

      Because there were so many of us (90) in our group, and only 4 guides, they suggested we wait a bit to see how the group divided as to who were the faster climbers, slower, etc., in order to break us up into groups of four. The terrain we’d be hiking through was ever changing, and included gravel, volcanic rocks, volcanic ash, sand, and jagged rocks. It was almost completely dark when we started up as there was no moonlight, so it was difficult to tell who and where the guides were with 90 flashlights snaking up the trail. Actually, that was probably the neatest thing about this trip-looking back and seeing a snake light of flashlights down the mountain. Within 15 minutes, I started to get hot and sweaty, so I peeled off a couple layers and put them in my backpack. In retrospect, that was a mistake. (There were many that trip). Within 20 minutes, it had started to rain. We continued on as the rain got heavier and the wind picked up. Within the next 2 hours, it began to pour and the wind howled as we changed direction while ascending. We were climbing in a zigzag pattern and one direction the wind pelted our faces with rain if we looked up, so it was fortunate that we were using our flashlights to watch our feet.

      After Station 7, there were sporadic warming huts that you can use to warm up in and/or spend the night. Like the law of supply and demand, the higher you got, the less amount of huts and the higher the price. Since the original plan was to climb all night, we weren’t planning on using the huts. Therefore, we didn’t bring a lot of money (next mistake). After reaching the 7th Station, we were getting really wet, even through the rain gear. I stopped outside the warming hut to get out my $2 rain slicker (the think type you get at football games) to put over me and my backpack to try and save its contents. We had lost sight of almost everyone by this time. We didn’t want to stand out in the wind and rain as we were getting cold fast, and couldn’t go inside as the hut wanted $30 just to come in and rest. We continued on since we knew some others were ahead of us. No sign of the guides.

      At the 8th Station, it was getting scary. We were soaked. We were alone. The wind was howling. It was pouring, you know, the kind of sideways rain you see Anderson Cooper standing in. It was $75 to enter this hut. Toby and I had maybe $50 worth of Yen between us and they would not accept Dollars. We couldn’t figure out where we were. We thought we’d passed the 8th Station, but another sign said 8th Station ahead. Our maps got so wet that they were falling apart. As it turned out, there were actually 2 different 8th Stations and this was Station 8 ½ --sort of. (Information that would have been nice to have at the time). We ended up entering the 6 p8th Station outhouseerson outhouse next to the hut in order to get out of the driving wind and rain and try to regroup. Within the next 15 minutes, about 10 others from our group had crowded into the outhouse with us. At that point, a Japanese guide came out of the hut to use the outhouse. Imagine her surprise. 12 American tourists huddling in there trying to figure out what they were doing. “Where is your guide?” she asked. “We have no idea.” we replied. “Do you know the typhoon is here?” she asked. “Yep, we are getting that idea,” we reply. “You need to take shelter in the hut,” she suggests. “We don’t have the money,” we reply. “Then you need to go back down the mountain.,” she says. “WHAT? Where is the descending trail?” we ask. “You can’t get there from her, you must descend using the ascending trail,” she says. Well, that certainly didn’t sound good. Even more discouraging was the fact that the buses had left and weren’t due back until 11AM. Everything at the 5th Station was closed and locked up. There was nowhere to go, we were stranded in an outhouse on the side of Mt. Fuji, at night, in a typhoon, with a flashlight. Could it really get any worse than this?

       

      Of course it could. The manager of the hut came out and demanded we vacate his outhouse. “No resting here,” he said. Well, what did he think we should do in a typhoon on the side of the mountain with no money and no guide? “Go down!” he said. So, left with no other options, down we went.

       

      On certain turns the gusts would knock me off my foothold. It was incredibly dangerous. Somewhere, I had snagged my high-tech $2 rain slicker on a rock, which tore a hole in the side. The wind found this hold and continued to tear is larger. At one point the slicker actually tore off my body and blew away, that was how bad the wind had gotten. As the slicker whipped by Toby, he stopped, turned and stared at me, and then just shook his head. We descended to the next station (first Station 8) where the price of entry had now doubled. We were getting desperate, but had no choice but to continue down.

      Somewhere between first Station 8 and Station 7, we found two of our guides. They’d come looking for us-finally. The wanted to know where we’d been. I seriously considered beating them with my hiking stick, but didn’t have the energy. They said they’d parked all the other climbers in various huts along the way and we were the last group to go in a hut and take shelter. Wow, why didn’t we think of that? We explained we didn’t have the money, so they agreed to pay and could reimburse them later. The next hut we came to wouldn’t let us in unless we had dry clothes to put on. Everything in my backpack was completely soaked. We stripped down as best we could, putting our wet clothes in trash bags as there was nowhere to dry them. It was almost 1AM. Then our unfriendly hosts inform us that we have to vacate by 5AM as they have reservations (in a typhoon?) and even though it was predicted to be the height of the storm, we’d have to leave by then. We didn’t know whether to stay until 5AM and leave when it got worse, or leave now and go where? Finally, Toby said, “Look, we have NO good option here. We have to leave now, it’s not going to get better. We aren’t going to get warmer. We have no good option. Let’s go. NOW.” Ok, since this was the most I’d heard Toby actually speak in the last 4 hours, I figured I’d better listen. We got our soaking wet clothes our of the trash bags, actually wrung them out, put them back on and headed out into the storm. Wow, I can‘t describe how much that sucked. The rest of our little group silently followed.

      The next hut down was more accommodating. They helped us undress and actually gave us little gold and blue sweatsuits to warm up in. We looked like some kind of freak Japanese gymnastics team. Even funnier was the fact that they were all one size. tea at the warming hutImagine American men wearing one size fits all Japanese sweatsuits. Or, maybe you shouldn’t.

      At this point, our guides suggested we have some hot tea and lay down for a few hours. It was 2AM. They opened a door to this giant room that was similar to a fraternity cold air dorm, only without the bunks. Two large levels of sleeping plThe group bedatforms with beds all crammed together like sardines. Toby and I slept between a family of 4 and another couple. Not that we slept much. The rain was beating on the roof and the wind was howling all night long. My feet were freezing and I kept trying to find Toby’s feet to warm them up but his were somewhere lost in the family of 4. After dozing in and out for about 4 hours, the guides came in and told us to get up, put our wet clothes on again and head down as the weather was supposed to get even worse. So once again, we wrung out our clothes and started back down the mountain. It was daylight, so at least we didn’t need the flashlight. Everything was shrouded in fog and rain. We made itArrival at the bottom down in about another 1 ½ hours. We got a change of clothes off the bus and headed to the bathrooms to change. There was several inches of water in the bottom of my backpack. Even my Tic-Tac mints had water in them. I also had my passport, thinking that if I fell off the side of the mountain, someone could identify my body (another mistake). Even today, that poor thing still looks like a worn version of War and Peace.

       

      The ride back to the hotel was long and silent. We took incredibly long, hot showers and went to bed, exhausted. The next morning the flights were oversold and we were told we didn’t have confirmed seats. Just before departure, a Flight Attendant announced they’d found two seats in the middle of coach. What a relief. Believe it or not, there are some instances where you would do anything for a middle seat in coach on an 11 hour flight. I sat down and put my hiking boots (which were still wet) under my seat thinking that the 0% humidity for 11 hours would finally dry them. I woke up somewhere over South Dakota. Yes, I’d managed to sleep sitting up, in a middle coach seat, for almost 9 hours. The Flight Attendants were referring to me as the “coma girl”.

      While we are disappointed we didn’t get to finish our ascent, I don’t think Toby and I have much desire to summit the mountain again (and definitely not at night). In retrospect, probably the most memorable thing about the trip? My hiking boots were STILL wet when I got home.

       

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 1605
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  • Mt Fuji 5th Station Mt Fuji 5th Station

    • From: skymoose
    • Description:
      Photos from Mt. Fuji climb
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 1041
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  • Arrival at the bottom Arrival at the bottom

    • From: skymoose
    • Description:
      Photos from Mt. Fuji climb
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 541
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  • tea at the warming hut tea at the warming hut

    • From: skymoose
    • Description:
      Photos from Mt. Fuji climb
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 364
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  • The group bed The group bed

    • From: skymoose
    • Description:
      Photos from Mt. Fuji climb
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 522
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