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13 Search Results for ""trunk bay""

  • Trunk Bay, US Virgin Islands Trunk Bay, US Virgin Islands

    • From: djacques4
    • Description:

      Two of my kids swimming in the turquoise waters of Trunk Bay.

    • 9 months ago
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  • St. John St. John

    • From: MaryJarvis
    • Description:

      On my Carribean Cruise we ported in St. Thomas and took a ferry to St. John. Very beautiful Island!!! We took a cab to Trunk Bay and had a blast snorkling, swimming and sunbathing. I really want to go back and stay there for more than a day trip. On our way back to the ferry I asked the driver to stop so I could take some pictures and I took plenty!!

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 1175
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  • Trunk bay USVI.JPG Trunk bay USVI.JPG

    • From: twillismbc
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 225
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  • Cruising the Caribbean Cruising the Caribbean

    • From: sanantonio08
    • Description:

      What more perfect way to see the Caribbean than to take a cruise? Hmmm, which cruise to take? Itinerary was my priority and I was willing to take whichever cruise was going to get me to Captain of the Victorythe beaches of my dreams. I embarked the Carnival Victory on a week-long Spring Break journey from San Juan, Puerto Rico to a sampling of six very distinctive islands: St. Thomas (St. John), Dominica, Barbados, St. Lucia, St. Kitts, and St. Maarten. I will not be cruising Carnival again; however, you get what you pay for which is transportation, a bed, and a shower. The food and the general atmosphere of the ship including the clientele did not exceed my low expectations.Trunk Bay, St. John

      Day 1- St. Thomas, USVI

      As with all of the islands, I took a taxi to get to the beach so bring cash (US dollars are accepted everywhere in the Caribbean, but be wary of drivers who try to overcharge or not return the proper amount of change). I rode a ferry from St. Thomas to St. John, the latter being the more tranquil of the two. There are two different ferries: 1.From Charlotte Amalie, a 5-minute $4 taxi ride and a 45-minute $12 ferry. 2. From Red Hook, a 20-minute $10 taxi and a 15-minute $6 ferry. Stepping off of the ferry in Cruz Bay, there’s a nice stretch of beach lined with restaurants and I might have been satisfied to stay right there. If you don’t do anything else in your life, take a taxi to Cinnamon Bay. Just north of Trunk Bay (where the masses convene), Cinnamon Bay is governed by the U.S. Park Service, as is most of the island. Besides the most beautiful sand and water I’ve ever seen, it has campsites, a restaurant, a convenience store, and recreational rentals. The water is calm and perfect for snorkeling and kayaking. I didn’t want to leave and I am committed to returning.Dominica Stained Glass

       

      Day 2- Dominica

      In doing my homework, I found that Dominica is not known for its beaches, it is known for its waterfalls and its rivers. I recommend an excursion on this island; unfortunately, I didn’t take my own advice. Walking around the downtown there is much shopping to be found, but save your money for St. Martin.

       

      Day 3- Barbados

      Bridgetown was a full-fledged city and I enjoyed the architecture it held. Most cruisers head to Malibu Beach ($3 taxi) so I headed in the opposite direction to Miami Beach ($10 taxi) in Oistins. Oistins has a fish market and a row of fish shacks that are a short walk to the beach. The Miami Beach Oistins, Barbadosbeach was well equipped with picnic tables and lots of shady trees to hang your hammock. To the left of the lifeguard stand were waves meant for surfing where I lost a pair of sunglasses. The beach consisted mostly of locals; a few of which were lurking around, not dressed for the beach, which made me wary of leaving items unattended.

       

      St. Lucia

      Day 4- St. Lucia

      I took an excursion here, a bike and hike to a waterfall near Anse la Rey. The island was saturated with poverty and this city was no exception. The bike ride did not meet my expectations; just a gravel road without much scenery and two very steep climbs. My money would have been much better spent on the beach or a catamaran ride as the cliffs and shoreline were spectacular.

       

      Day 5- St. Kitts

      St. Kitts had a nicely built port that walks right into the city. On Friday there was live music in the streets and lots of grilling going on. Friday is a popular day on all of the islands for community parties. This sparsely populated island was very clean, it’s the law. The drive to the beach was Drive to Cockleshell Beach, St. Kittsdefinitely the most scenic. Keep an eye out for monkeys. There is a point with a simultaneous view of the Atlantic and Caribbean. I spent all day at Cockleshell beach ($7 taxi) and don’t regret a single second of it. As the name implies, it has an abundance of shells (aka free souvenirs). Along the south of the beach is a Reggae bar and grill and great snorkeling. I camped out on the north side at the Spice Mill. This new restaurant and bar rents daybeds for $30 a day, rent the round ones as they can be moved to stay in the shade of the umbrella. They also have chairs for $5 and umbrellas for $10 which is the standard rate throughout the Caribbean. As anSpice Mill Daybeds Cockleshell Beach, St. Kitts alternative, I brought a $3 inflatable raft from Wal-Mart that doubled as a chaise lounge on beaches where chairs were unavailable or where I didn’t have much time. The bar made great pina coladas (try one mixed with strawberry daiquiri) and the wood grilled pizza was enough for 2-3 people. It was windy here which made kayaking out of the question, but well-suited for wave runners. There were pesky locals trying to encourage massages and the beach was loaded with cruisers, but still a very enjoyable experience.

       

      Day 6- St. Maarten/St. MartinOrient Beach, St. Martin

      Philipsburg, capital of the Dutch side of the island, was the only port in which you could walk off the boat and walk to the beach. To save a few steps take the water taxi ($4). The current here was fairly strong and the water got deep quickly. Take a ride to the French side to Orient Beach. It had the softest sand by far and waves that make a wave pool jealous. Gorgeous! Warning, this is a clothing optional beach. Marigot had the cheapest shopping like t-shirts 3 for $10 and also some real quality items like some hand-beaded belts and bracelets. There were several appealing restaurants. Definitely stop by Sarafina’s bakery. The Sarafina's Marigot, St. MartinFrench really know what they’re doing; a great place for breakfast, lunch, or dessert. It was nicely appointed and full of locals, which is always a good sign. Marigot is home to Fort Louis which is a short climb and well worth the breathtaking views. A taxi to Marigot or Orient Beach from Philipsburg is $7.

       

      Capitol of San Juan, Puerto Rico

      Day 7- San Juan

      I took an excursion by the capitol building, a fort, and the old town to the Bacardi factory for a tour. The tour was short, but informative, and a bit rushed. It was modern, but didn’t allow you to see the operation in person. The free drinks made up for it. I wish I had a day or more before or after the cruise so I could get to know San Juan and the island. Post-cruise would be preferred since the airport was packed on Sunday. The question should be why leave at all?

    • Blog post
    • 4 years ago
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  • Trunk Bay, St. John Trunk Bay, St. John

    • From: sanantonio08
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 576
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  • Trunk Bay-St. John,USVI Trunk Bay-St. John,USVI

    • From: johnjaneelliott
    • Description:

      One of the most spectacular views we've ever seen.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 563
  • Trunk Bay USVI Trunk Bay USVI

    • From: rgtmum
    • Description:

      Trunk Bay view from St John USVI.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 1044
  • View from Trunk Bay, St. John' View from Trunk Bay, St. John's USVI

    • From: NancyGonzalez
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 455
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  • Trunk Bay, USVI Trunk Bay, USVI

    • From: Meriam
    • Description:

      I took this photo during Tropical Storm Noel in October 2007, which is why there is only one person on the beach.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 665
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  • Trunk Bay, St. John Trunk Bay, St. John

    • From: kpm1031
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 3121
  • Stunning Beach of Trunk Bay Stunning Beach of Trunk Bay

    • From: brucemost
    • Description:

      Trunk Bay on St John Island in the U.S. Virgin Islands is considered one of the most beautiful beaches in the world. Its soft white powdery sand runs a quarter-mile long and spills into turquoise water. The bay is also part of the Virgin Islands National Park and includes a marked underwater snorkeling trail.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 2730
  • My Perfect Paradise My Perfect Paradise

    • From: Dream29706
    • Description:

      There are few times in your life when the world seems far away. Everyone has that one place where they can completely lose themselves.  The Ritz Carlton resort in St. Thomas is "my place." The people, the music, the food, the accommodations, and the sounds of the ocean are just what I need when it's time for a break from my busy world.  My first time in the Virgin Islands was March 21 - April 5, 2008.  I felt like I had literally stepped into a postcard.  The scenery was gorgeous and I was convinced I had found my paradise. 

      The highlights of my trip:

      Scuba diving - I love the water but my first time scuba diving I was a little nervous.  It was difficult getting used to breathing properly and popping my ears.   However, once I made it to the ocean floor I couldn't believe my eyes.  I was actually doing it, I was scuba diving and it was amazing!!  The life underwater is incredible.  Swimming with the fish and swimming through the colorful reefs was unreal.

      Someone else needed a break- While enjoying a drink on my chair overlooking the ocean my friend asks me if I had my camera.  Of course, I ALWAYS have my camera handy.  I walk down the beach with him to see Barack Obama sitting right there!! He was so friendly and was just like everyone else there relaxing on the beach.  I guess everyone can use a little escape every now and then. 

      The town- St. Thomas has some amazing restaurants and throughout my stay I was able to visit several of them.  My absolute favorite is Duffy's Love Shack.  I love the beachy atmosphere and of course the signature Shark Tanks!!! Smores for our table as a late night snack was a big hit as well.  Other restarants I enjoyed were East End Cafe (amazing Italian food and wine), XOXO Wine Bar (I sure do love wine), Caribbean Saloon (slot machines and Photo Hunt), Molly Malone's (delicious food and cool atmosphere!!), Agave Terrace (best view from a bar that I've ever seen!!), and Havana Blue (best ambiance).  I love food and St. Thomas had some of the best.  Not to mention the multiple orders of edamame that I enjoyed daily on the beach along with a painkiller from the bar :)

      Island hopping- On our last day in paradise we decided to rent a boat and island hop.  This was by far the favorite part of my trip.  We came upon a tiny island called Sandy Spit in the BVIs that was absolutely surreal. Google it!  It seemed as though the sky and the water were the same color.  We jumped off the boat and swam ashore.  It was a gorgeous inhabited island full of shells and tiny little crabs.  I'll never forget the moment I walked to the edge of the island and spun around, all I could see was water and islands in the distance. Talk about unforgettable!!

      Foxy's on Jost Van Dyke for lunch!!! Best cheeseburger I ever had! The island and people were so laid back.  I walked off the boat barefoot and we went up to the restaurant. The restaurant is decorated with tee-shirts and other items that people have left behind and signed.  Luckily for us we even got to meet Foxy himself!!!

      Next was the Soggy Dollar of Jost Van Dyke. You have jump off the boat and swim ashore to this bar.  Hence the name.  I'll never forget running and jumping off the boat into the clear blue water.  Soggy Dollar is known for it's awesome painkillers.  They sure were good. Sipping my painkiller and laying in a hammock was more than blissful.

      Snorkeling off the coast of St. John was gorgeous.  Swimming along side lots of fish and sea turtles.  Cinnamon Bay and Trunk Bay were beautiful.  How I would love one of those houses on the hillside!!

      Since my first trip to St. Thomas I returned in early August and will spend another 4 weeks there in 2009.  There really is no place like home for a traveler, but visiting my own perfect paradise comes pretty close.

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    • 6 years ago
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  • The Mouth of The Bull Panama The Mouth of The Bull Panama

    • From: NanseaC
    • Description:

      Eager to escape the clamor and chaos of San Jose, we boarded a Nature Air commuter plane at the crack of dawn. Bocas del Toro, (Spanish for "mouth of the bull”) in Panama. Our destination was Dolphin Bay on Isla Cristobal. Gazing through the window of our small plane, the mountainous jungles of Costa Rica abruptly fell away as the Bocas del Toro archipelago loomed into view, the lush islands scattered serenely upon the dazzling sea. The area, one of the earth’s last Eden’s, contains a number of secluded islands in the Caribbean, many still untouched by human development. The region consists of nine islands, 52 keys and over 200 tiny islets with a total population of 9,000, the majority of which live in the town of Bocas del Toro.

      Upon arrival at the airport in Panama the skies suddenly darkened and the rains came, thundering down upon the metal roof. The din was so loud that we had to raise our voices to be heard. We waited our turn to enter Customs and Immigration, a diminutive room that housed two battered desks, a clanking fan and one rusting refrigerator. Entering the room we presented our passports to a woman seated at the first desk who painstakingly wrote down all of our information in a bulky notebook and then, turning around in the tiny crowded space and squeezing past the waiting travelers, we approached the second desk to offer our bags for a cursory inspection.

      Jose, our host for the next few days, greeted us as promised and we ran to a waiting taxi amid a thundering deluge of “biblical” proportions. The taxi ride through streets that had suddenly become raging rivers was thankfully brief as we were delivered to the waterfront. Jose produced a number of oversized plastic bags and speedily covered our belongings as well as himself, loaded them into his bright blue wooden panga[[1] and waited patiently while we procured the necessary “beverages” at the local store. Wine and cheese in hand, we boarded Jose’s open skiff for the crossing to Isla Cristobal. The torrential rains continued unabated as we pulled our raingear tight and hunkered down for the last leg of our passage. The half hour voyage seemed like hours as we navigated through the watery labyrinth of mangrove islets. We arrived at Dolphin Bay, unbelievably sodden yet thrilled to have arrived in paradise! Our hostess, Erica met us on the veranda, and showed us to our room where we found our belongings perfectly dry. After a quick change, Erica graciously joined us for a glass of wine and introduced us to her three noisy parrots, a bevy of laying hens and 2 large friendly dogs.

       After a short siesta, the rains subsided and we boarded Jose’s wooden boat for a short trip to a neighboring restaurant that perched precariously on stilts over the water. . It was a pleasure to revel in the sea that seemed to magically stretch into the night; traversing the heavens. The mild air of the tropics, punctuated by a distant flash of lightening, more wine and an extraordinary meal of fresh fish, coconut rice and vegetables were perfect way to end the day.

      The following morning the sea and the equatorial sun united to fill our room with an impossibly brilliant light. An excellent cup of coffee in hand, I decided to have a closer look at Erica and Jose’s home. Rounding the corner of the house, I was taken aback to find only a crude fence and lush, impenetrable jungle. I had not realized until that very moment, that Isla Cristobal was “off the grid”.  No roads or power, no telephone or water, no hospitals or stores. Isla Cristobal is a water community and the only perceptible sounds were the winds and the sea, a cacophony of birds and insects, the occasional crow of a rooster and the thrum of a distant boat passing by.

      Locals travel between the islands in cayucos and pangas, some with motors, but most without. These traditional boats deliver their passengers to school, the market and to work. Jose, who was born and raised on Cristobal, has never driven a car. We marveled at his uncanny sense of direction, navigating the winding channels through the thick mangrove islets, which he assured us, is merely second nature to all natives of Bocas. Erica, our vivacious and cordial hostess, grew up in Transylvania under communist rule and immigrated to Canada as a teen.  Her obvious sense of independence and adventure brought her to Isla Cristobal two years ago when she risked all and built her lovely home, Dolphin Bay Hideaway, and opened her doors to guests.  After an elegant breakfast served on her airy veranda overlooking the sea, we headed out for an incredible day.

      We were outfitted with snorkeling gear for our first stop at a splendid coral reef in an uninhabited bay.  Jose threw out the anchor and, after cautioning us not to touch or disturb the reef in any way, pointed us in the right direction and left us to explore on our own. The water was warm and unsullied and we were fortunate to observe many different examples of coral including brain and elk.  It is hard to find the words to portray how incredible it felt; the sun’s rays penetrated the crystal clear waters as we silently snorkeled above the living coral reef, viewing a plethora of thriving sea creatures including schools of brightly colored fish, barracuda and needle fish.

      Reluctantly climbing back into the boat, we headed to Isla Bastimentos and entered a narrow waterway that wound its way a few kilometers through the jungle and into Bahia Honda which is located in the heart of the island. Amid the sounds of exotic birds, frogs and cicadas, Jose pointed out a sloth lounging in the trees a few feet above while brilliant blue and red crabs scuttled along the river bank. In the mysterious stillness of Bastimentos Island, Jose cut the engine and poled the last part of our journey where we tied up at a small platform nestled among the roots of a tree. Proceeding on foot, we hiked along the small river toward a small village. Along the way we spotted a collection of brilliant blue dugouts pulled up on the river bank. The small enclave we passed through is inhabited by members of the Ngobe-Bugle tribe[2], an indigenous people, some of them still living in their original lifestyle, their traditional homes are constructed from a special wood called Jira and covered with thatched roofs. After paying the proper fees to pass through their village, we continued on through cacao trees, laden with their rich red bounty and on towards “the cave” which is a few kilometers in length. I have to admit, the opening of the cave alone was daunting, and I was only willing to venture less than 25 feet into the cave which houses thousands of fruit bats peacefully hanging from the roof of the cave. The air was chill and dank, the floor slippery with guano. We made our way back to the boat and traveled back up the river and around the island to Magic Bay. There was a well maintained trail which we followed across the island to Red Frog beach which got its name from the the red poison dart frogs that inhabit this part of the island.

      The beach was crowded so we opted to go for a quick swim and head to “Roots”, a fantastic local restaurant that serves terrific Caribbean/Creole food. We tied up to one of the pilings and climbed a wooden ladder that led from the water to the restaurants platform where we kicked back and enjoyed live music, ice cold beer and the best fish that I have ever tasted in my life. The beer definitely did me in and we headed back to Dolphin Bay for a quick siesta and then out again later for dinner on the water. Our last day was spent quietly. Jose went off to play baseball (his team won) while Erica accompanied three of her latest guests to a coco plantation. Michael took advantage of the pristine waters in a dugout canoe and I read all day…..delightful. Living off the grid is obviously not for everyone but I envy the life that Erica and Jose enjoy and thank them for sharing it with us.

      [if !supportFootnotes]

      [endif]

      Cayuco: A dugout canoe, carved by hand from the trunk of a single tree by native Central American craftsmen.

      Panga:  A seaworthy open skiff that serves as the workhorse for small-scale fishermen. Used extensively throughout Central and South America, the boat's lean profile resembles a large heavy knife called a Panga

       

      The largest indigenous group in the Bocas del Toro Archipelago are the Ngobe-Bugle Indians who rely almost exclusively on subsistence farming and are struggling to maintain their cultural identity. The other indigenous Indians are the Nasos or Teribes, a rapidly diminishing group who have been experiencing a swift destruction of their traditional way of life in recent years due to ecotourism in the La Amistad International Park, missionary activity and the exodus of their young men and women.

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
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