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21 Search Results for "Volunteering"

  • How to Prepare for your Gap Ye How to Prepare for your Gap Year

    • From: wava
    • Description:

       

      A gap year is when you want to take a break from your study at school and go on an adventurous journey while you volunteer to work. Since a gap year provides students with an opportunity to learn about a new culture, language, people, and climate while they can also explore the beautiful landscapes and exotic places, the trend of going on a gap year is spreading over to many countries. However, a proper preparation for your gap year is very important. It takes some thoughtful planning, time, and effort to make your stay on the gap year a very memorable and enjoyable experience.

      Before you plan to go on a gap year experience project , you should ask yourself where you would like to go and what you want to do. Also, ask yourself how long you would like to stay on the gap year. Some people like to travel to a new country just to experience a different culture and for sight-seeing while others want to gain some real work experience by volunteering work. There are many people that really want to help poor countries and underprivileged children living there. Depending on your purpose, you can prepare for your gap year. Without a proper planning and preparation, you are likely to face many difficulties and might not be able to enjoy your trip.

      Estimate your budget or how much you are ready to spend on your gap year. List the activities you would like to do and how much they would cost you. If you are tight on your budget, you can plan to stay in a hostel or a shared-accommodation. For those who want to volunteer, make sure you do a research on the programme pre-requisites. You should be mentally well-prepared for accommodations and food expenses. You should also get a health-kit, including things like medicines, water purifier, sunscreen lotions, re-hydration powder, insect repellents, etc.  It is always a good practice to get your passport ready well in advance so to avoid last-minute stress. Check for visa requirements and passport processing time.

      Another very important step in preparing for your gap year is learning a bit about the culture of the places you are going to travel to. It would be even better if you learned the local language. You should also be prepared to face a different weather conditions as you are going to a new place. Make sure you take warm clothes with you if you are visiting a place where it gets too cold. Be prepared to meet different people that may speak with a different accent. You should be able to adapt to their culture and the way of living life especially if you are going to volunteer to work and spend more than a few weeks.

      If you are not sure where you would like to go for a gap year even though you know what you want to do on your gap year, you should take assistance of a travel agency that specializes in gap year travels. They can also help you with special programmes that will meet your requirements and budget. They have a vast experience and expertise in helping students and others that want to go to a different country and experience a different culture. A good preparation for your gap year travel also equips with confidence and knowledge about the place you are visiting. This will help you stay positive during your gap year.

    • Blog post
    • 5 months ago
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  • Will an Internship Abroad Give Will an Internship Abroad Give you Good Scope for Future

    • From: laurabensongp
    • Description:

       

      At present, taking an internship abroad can provide you a wide range of benefits. Internship after degree is found to be very beneficial to enhance the skills of professionals. Taking internship from a popular institution is one of the best ways to gain more knowledge about a specific topic. Apart from gaining more knowledge about subject, it also provides a preview about the carrier field of person.

      What are the benefits of taking internship from abroad?

      This question is quite common among students. Allowance to try out new thing is one of the main benefits of taking internship from abroad. It is a perfect choice for people who wish to do research on a particular topic. Internship also allows people to do volunteering activities. For example, a person willing to take internship on physiotherapy can do volunteering activity by helping the poor people. Also, taking internship abroad is one of the best ways to earn more money from the future work of people.
      Internship to gain experience
      Gaining experience plays a key role in developing a prominent position in profession. Internship from abroad can help the people to gain a wide experience by meeting different people. Value is another factor that has to be considered while taking internship. People planning to take internship are usually advised to get it from abroad or developed countries. It allows people to gain more experience with high value. Priority of gaining job worldwide is one among the main benefits of taking internship abroad. People in search of the best ways to gain job abroad can make use of internship facilities of developed countries. Salary is another feature considered while taking internship from institution. Internship taken from abroad can provide more salary to people. As said earlier, those who wish to be independent and organized can make use of internship facilities from popular institutions.
      Today, many people are going jobless with their degree certificates. Gaining internship from popular institutions can provide instant job facilities to the needy ones. Hence the chance of employment facility is increased by taking an internship abroad. At present, taking internship from far off places is a quite common procedure done after business studies. Earning credit for internship is usually determined on the basis of the efficiency of the employer. Today, there are many carrier guidance and counselling centres available online to assist the needy people. People interested to know more about the internship facility abroad can make use of online guides for clarifying their doubts.

      Author Bio

      Laura Benson is a content writer and her interests are Travel. She is a professional blogger from London and has written many articles in Travel categories. So far, as of now she is doing research on Easy jet phone number

    • Blog post
    • 5 months ago
    • Views: 338
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  • Asheylou

    • Points:652
    • Views: 129
    • Since: 3 years ago
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  • Mara Sunset Mara Sunset

    • From: ljenks46
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 165
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  • Babies at Play Babies at Play

    • From: ljenks46
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    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 139
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  • Giraffe with Bird Giraffe with Bird

    • From: ljenks46
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    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 178
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  • Victoria Falls Victoria Falls

    • From: ljenks46
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 149
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  • Mom and Baby Mom and Baby

    • From: ljenks46
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    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 189
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  • For Budget Travelers For Budget Travelers

    • From: ghachok
    • Description:

      For few weeks volunteering the best place to visit in Nepal Pokhara The Innocent children home.

      The love company

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 300
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  • amiralove99

    • Points:652
    • Views: 116
    • Since: 4 years ago
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  • Kids on the Beach in Nicaragua Kids on the Beach in Nicaragua

    • From: crsurf
    • Description:

      While volunteering in Puerto Cabezas, I was walking on the beach taking photos and a group of kids came up to have their photo taken. They were so excited to see their faces on the display screen, and I later sent the photos to the AMICA (Asociacion de Mujeres Indigenas en la Costa Altantica) to share with their families.

       

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 373
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  • A Morning with Macchu Picchu A Morning with Macchu Picchu

    • From: marianda
    • Description:

      as history teacher, this momentous occassion was huge for me. i will never forget my month in Peru volunteering and sightseeing. Including my spontaneous 5 day/4 night trek and camp excursion to Macchu Picchu

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 65
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  • BrianKinkade

    • Points:652
    • Views: 201
    • Since: 4 years ago
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  • Building a School in Madagasca Building a School in Madagascar

    • From: MaryBethMalone
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 371
  • Volunteering in Madagascar Volunteering in Madagascar

    • From: MaryBethMalone
    • Description:

      Me, walking with the lead females of the Malagasy Tribe that my husband and I volunteered with. 

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 307
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  • LisaS

    • Member
    • Points:2331
    • Views: 374
    • Since: 5 years ago
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  • Perfection in the Indian Ocean Perfection in the Indian Ocean

    • From: bluebora
    • Description:

      I volunteered with Earthwatch their first summer in the Seychelles. We volunteers were there to assist marine biologists conduct the first biological survey of the island of Desroches. (They've since moved on to other beautiful islands in the Seychelles.)  This pristine jewel was our beach. Need I say more?

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 2651
  • Into Kenya: A taste of the oth Into Kenya: A taste of the other side of the world

    • From: equiliberate
    • Description:

      What is a “developing country”? While there exists no formal definition, some might call it a euphemism for “poor”. Indeed, four months ago I would have defined it as a country plagued with corruption, ultimately resulting in poverty. And I would have defined poverty as a lack of access to life necessities like education, potable water, and health care. But, I would not have fully understood what these words mean. Watching movies on a laptop in the comfort of a middle-class, American home about such issues facing so-called “developing countries” is far from seeing them with your own eyes.

      Four months ago, Africa might as well have been one large country. I knew nothing about it other than that it was a large land mass on the other side of the world with lots of “developing countries” and lots of large, carnivorous animals. I would have struggled to locate any country in Africa, let alone name one. So, when an opportunity arose for me to take a break from engineering to help restore mangrove forests in Kenya, I put any fears of the unknown aside and took it, selfishly. This was my chance, I thought, to rid myself of embarrassing ignorance regarding both mangroves and Africa. This was my chance to identify ways to help Kenyans solve whatever problems they have.

      Kenya is, after all, widely regarded as a developing country. My experience in front of the computer screen watching various documentaries taught me to expect all of the problems typical of developing countries:

      Corruption? Check. Kikuyu incumbent Mwai Kibaki ran against the "opposition" leader Raila Odinga of the Luo tribe in the December 2007 presidential election. Apparently, a questionable vote count unleashed a storm that had been brewing since the early 1960's when the country first gained its independence from Britain. Both the Luo and Kikuyu tribes are larger, and relatively well-established compared to the 40 other tribes in Kenya, but the Kikuyu have always dominated the political scene. Rather than establish a fair government, they favored their own when it came to appointing well-paid government positions and land rights. Resentment turned to protests, riots, and tribal fighting, ultimately resulting in death and displacement. Today, white tents lining roadsides house some of the hundreds of thousands of displaced people.

      Post-election turmoil

      Above: We pass white tents on our way back to Nairobi. These tents house some of the people displaced during the post-election chaos.

      Struggling education system? Check. When primary education first became free in 2003, enrollment tripled. Today, 85% of those in primary school finish, but only 2% of students make it to university. Higher education comes at a price not all can afford; public loans are available only to a small number of top students. Students that do not continue in school often become jua kali (literally “strong sun”, and so named for the typical working conditions of jua kali), artisans that make and sell crafts, produce, and other goods to people in their communities, and less commonly, to tourists. Teachers salaries are directly related to the level of school they teach at. A secondary school teacher makes 18,300 Ksh (282 USD) a year, about half what a civil servant brings in. It is no surprise that there is a massive shortage of qualified teachers in the country.

      Maasai Market

      Above: Hundreds of people gather at the Maasai Market to sell their crafts. There are good deals to be had on everything from ebony wood carvings to batiks if you know how to haggle.

      Lack of access to potable water? Check. When asked how many water companies there were in Kenya, a cab driver laughed and said “too many to name”. Water companies in Kenya, as in other developing countries, collect water from rivers, streams, aquifers, or rain, purify it, then command high prices. Those that cannot afford to pay can be seen collecting muddy water from streams potentially contaminated with fertilizer or pesticide runoff or other pollutants. Water privatization is effectively depriving people of access to the essence of life. Coca-Cola also dominates the beverage industry in Kenya. In other countries, people have protested Coca-Cola's practice of bottling the little water there is in the area only to ship it away to other parts of the country or even to other countries.

      Water privatizationAbove: A young man pushes a wooden cart filled with plastic water jugs. He fills them with water that private companies sell, then resells the water to anyone that can afford it.

      Lack of adequate health care? Check. I shared a cabin with two Western girls between Mombasa and Nairobi. One from Canada, one from California, both undergraduate students hoping to go to medical school. Volunteering for ten weeks in a urban Nairobi health clinic, they had accumulated many interesting stories. The Californian had delivered her first baby just days ago. Not yet in medical school, this is something she would never have been allowed to do in the U.S. A week earlier, she helplessly watched a baby die from a lack of oxygen – something readily available at any medical institution in any Western country.

      Kenya trainAbove: I met the two pre-med students on this train enroute to Nairobi from Mombasa. We all waited in a dry field for over an hour while workers replaced a part of the track that had been stolen.

      With so many problems to choose from, solving one had to be as simple as writing a check to one of those organizations that advertises on TV (for just 5 cents a day, you can feed....). What I quickly learned upon arrival, however, is all of these problems have deep political and cultural roots. To simply engineer solutions is to treat symptoms without providing a cure. Building a well may provide potable water to one village, but it does nothing to address the underlying problem – why did the village have no well in the first place? Likewise, volunteering to teach for a few years may relieve the teacher shortage in the short term, but it will not change the political system that sustains the teacher shortage after the volunteer term is long over. No. In order to ensure permanent change, you must understand the entire system. How well can an outsider comprehend the inner workings of such a system? Is it ethical to impose outsider ideals to solve a foreign problem?

      Who am I, an outsider, to say how they can do better? I come from a country with all the same problems, to a lesser degree. We Americans think we are part of a democracy, but our democracy only allows two viable political parties. A democracy is rendered ineffective without active participation; only a minority of our population turns out to vote. Our democracy exhibits the worst kind of corruption because we do neither realize nor care that it is corrupt. Our country chooses to spend more than 50% on defense while continuously shrinking our budget for education; we Americans can barely compete with Asian and European students. Americans are growing accustom to the idea of water privatization as we needlessly consume bottled water. Health care is so ridiculously expensive, many people cannot afford it. I spent several hours and over $200 just to get a week-long prescription for urinary tract antibiotics, and I went into the doctor's office knowing exactly what was wrong with me.

      Yet the researchers I met up with seemed to have made a difference. Mangrove forests are more than habitats for various crab and fish species. They provide wood for building homes and for fuel, help retain soil and prevent erosion, and act as a buffer between the ocean and coastal villages during bad weather. These forests are so useful that they are depleted faster than they are restored.

      Village theaterAbove: The village theater structure utilizes mangrove wood poles in the mud-packed walls and provides the structural frame for its roof.

      The effects of the research apparently have positive social, economic, and environmental impacts. Local village women have created an ecotourism venture by constructing a boardwalk through a mangrove forest and giving educational tours to passerbys. Restoration renews a threatened resource for the village so they can continue to build houses and burn fire wood, provides educational opportunities for local students to study with the researchers, and sustains the habitat of various species.

      Clearly good has come of this project, but I cannot help wondering what, perhaps unwanted, impressions I have unknowingly made on the people of this village. Do the benefits of the outcomes of such projects outweigh the drawbacks? Should we mind our own business and have faith in their undoubted ability to solve their own problems? Or, is it our ethical duty to take the knowledge we have gained in the West and lend a hand? I went to Kenya looking for solutions, and came back with more questions than I started with. Getting to know the country and its people only sparked a stronger desire to help them, yet I wonder what the right way to do that is.

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 2294
  • Maasai Market For Maasai Market For

    • From: mindybum
    • Description:

      After spending two amazing weeks volunteering with their cousins, the Samburu, I travelled to the Maasai village of Longido, Tanzania with two friends.  We stayed at a very remote campsite, with no facitilities other than the pit toilet. Our driver and cook had never camped in primitive conditions like this before!  A Maasai man led us to see his home and a morani (warrior) cave.  While there we were told that the women had gone to set up for market.  We didn't think anything of it and continued.  Then, as we approached our campsite, we realized what "the market" had meant...  He said "they're setting up for the tourists" and we said "What tourists?... he said "You".

      We arrived at the pathway to our camp where 30+ Maasai women and girls were liMaasai Blanket Sales-Womanning Maasai Girl Loved My Ukulelethe path with their blanket shops.  So, we bought as much jewelry from them as we could until darkness arrived.  I then pulled out my ukulele and played for them. They were dancing the only way they knew how, bouncing their beads up and down on their chests to the beat of my song!!! You just couldn't have recorded a moment like that.

      At this point, we thought we were off the hook, but as we awoke and ate breakfast in the morning we realized that several of them had set back up.  I said to my friends, "ok, how about we each just spend 10 more dollars with them".   I spent about 20 more and the girls spent another 30 each!!! Good sales women!!!!!

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 677
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  • VOLUNTEERING ON LE FERME BIOLO VOLUNTEERING ON LE FERME BIOLOGIQUE (ORGANIC FARM)

    • From: redhepcat
    • Description:

       

       

      I arrived at my hosts’ farm on Sunday, 12 October. Emmanuel and Muriel have had the farm for 5 years and have been hosting "wwoofers" (www.wwoof.org) for just as long. Muriel is a poterie (ceramics) and has her workshop is adjacent to the house. They have two boys, aged 7 and 2. The farm is mostly vegetables with some small fruits like blackberries, raspberries and argussiers (see my video of the latter). Other than pictures in foodie magazines, I don’t think I’ve ever seen such a variety of vegetables and many I’ve never seen before. On top of that, so many that I can now say I’ve eaten, if I knew the names of them. Practically every meal consists of what we picked that morning or the day before. Makes sense. Muriel makes bread everyday and I have been pleasantly surprised at every meal. The looks of somethings were not appealing and I’d repeat my little mantra “eat it now and you’ll forget about it by tomorrow” which turned out to be unnecessary. You really can’t judge a book by it’s cover. Obviously, all the dishes are vegetarian. Just this past Tuesday, Muriel made a vegetable soup with fish...the first non-vegetable thing I’ve eaten here besides bread. 

       

      Each day we start with a breakfast of toast with jams, nut butter, butter, and honey with tea and fruit. Then it’s off to the field or the tunnel (greenhouse). Emmanuel has a couple of other people that come to work and learn on the farm. Lionel, who works Mon-Wed and eventually plans to start his own farm, and Michael, an agriculture student at a school in Lons le Saunier who works Thurs and Fri. Sometimes I was pared with them for picking or washing the vegetables and we stumble through brief conversations in French and English. 

       

      I work from about 8:30 or 9am until 12:30 then we break for lunch. In France, at least in this rural area, kids come home for lunch and Laslo gets off the bus at about 12:15 and leaves at 1:15. So everyone eats together, including anyone helping on the farm that day. We start with salad, then a vegetable dish, then cheese, dessert and café followed by swift conversation I can’t understand. I work for one more hour then I’m done for the day. I typically work alone in the afternoon, gathering walnuts (I feel like a squirrel), picking raspberries or argussiers, which I am finally done with. Argussier picking is a slow process because the bush is covered with sharp, long, needle-like thorns. Since there isn’t much else to do here, I’ve taken walks, read or worked on my photos and videos. 

       

       

      The farm has a mother cat that isn’t taking care of the one baby she has. So, Emmanuel has been caring for it. This little thing can’t be any more than 3 to 4 weeks old. I’m guessing, since I don’t know much about cats. He would follow us to the greenhouse and then into field and nearly everywhere we’d go. One day, I picked him up and carried him with me to the field and perched him on my shoulder where he stayed for most of the morning! Each time I put him down, he’s climb up my leg again, so I had a little friend for the rest of the week. 

       

       

      So the week ended and Saturday morning Muriel and the kids were kind enough to drop me off in Arbois, about 30 minutes north of Grusse. In my guidebook, it was noted at the home to Jurassienne wines and the Vin Jaune (yellow wine which is aged in oak for 6 years). Jura is the department where I am. I had to check it out and get out of the house and away from the kids for a  break. I toured the museum dedicated to the local wine production then walked uphill 2.5km to Pupillon where there were several caves available for tasting the local wine. The vintner I visited (and the locals) was very proud that the grapes of Ploussard and Savingnin were only grown in the Jura. Still hadn’t tasted the Vin Jaune yet and I planned to splurge on a nice meal at an organic restaurant in Arbois who pairs a 5 vin janune tasting with your selected meal, including a 1976. I’m thinking, maybe I will discover something exciting to take back home with me.


      I’m at the restaurant, La Balance Mets et Vins, and order a three course meal with ham as a starter, coq de coquette, and creme brulée. Two things I didn’t realize: one, I had coq de coquette before and didn’t like it, and two, with the 5 vin jaunes, they added a small appetizer and another dessert....another creme brulée, though slightly different. The coq de coquette comes to my table. It’s pieces of chicken basically in a thick cream sauce with morel mushrooms. I dip the ladel in and all I can think was that I don’t recognize any of these chicken parts! What is this? Reluctantly, I ate it. Then there’s the vin jaune. I’ve been looking forward to tasting this ALL day. The first sniff was like taking a whiff of Calvados. Smelled like a spirit, very oaky and high in alcohol. The taste, thankfully, was much milder with flavors of butter, nutmeg and allspice, but still reflected a spirit, and is only enough to write home about because, well, it was “an experience.” They served the last two vin jaunes with a small creme brulée with a dose of vin jaune on the top. That was probably the best thing all evening and the best way to enjoy the vin jaune... in the creme brulée. I was so thankful it was tiny. I was already stuffed. After I finished I was looking around the dining room, content that the experience was over, and from the opposite direction I heard something being put on my table. I thought it was the check. But there sat another creme brulée, three times the size of the one I just finished. I almost laughed out load. I learned from the server that the first one was part of the “extra” pairings with the wine. I recited my mantra again. 

       

      After a rough start to the morning, and a long line at the hotel check-out at Hotel des Messageries. I ran to the train to go to Besancon. I had seen everything in Arbois already and Emmanuel was to pick me up at 7pm that night. Upon arriving in Besancon, I walked to the Cathedral St Jean and spent about 2 hours there. It was beautiful and peaceful and hardly anyone entering in the middle of  a Sunday afternoon. It was also home to a 200+ year old clock that showed the tides, timing of the lunar and solar eclipses, times in 16 cities around the world, the leap years and amazingly, one hand that moves once every 400 years. The first time it moved was in 2000. Amazing to witness. 

       

      My host was waiting for me at the train station and on the way back, gave me some bad news. Le petit chat was dead. He had put him in his little box outside the front door and got in the car, began to pull away from the house and heard him screech. I had made a little friend, and you all know me, I don’t like cats, so that said something about le petit. 

       

      I mentioned earlier that my hosts eat everything from the garden. As for  the 2-year-old, it really IS possible for a toddler to eat anything. Stuff most two-year-olds in the US would never touch until they were out of college. After lunch one day, I saw him finish two whole figs, down to the stem, in less than 2 minutes. Strangely, he has taken to me a bit. In the evenings before dinner, he wants to sit on my lap and look through books. It’s cute, but he flips through them so fast, I can’t read the French! I’ve been trying to read his books and looking up words in the dictionary. Children’s books! I can’t read a two-year-old’s book. I’m practically resorting to grunting like him when I can’t figure out how to say something. 

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 1691
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