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41 Search Results for "benches"

  • Frankenmuth Michigan Frankenmuth Michigan

    • From: Linda Brannen
    • Description:

      Beautiful patterns with benches and flowers in Frankenmuth, Michigan.

    • 9 months ago
    • Views: 168
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  • A Trip to Safed, Israel -- Cit A Trip to Safed, Israel -- City of Kabbalah

    • From: laurierappeport
    • Description:

      Spending a day in Safed is like stepping back into the 16th century, the era in which Safed became the fourth of Judaism's Four Holy Cities. The old historic Jewish Quarter is built on the mountainside, below the ruins of the Crusader Castle which dominates the mountaintop. Throughout the old lanes and twisting alleyways of the Old Quarter visitors can enter the synagogues and other sites that are rich with religious, cultural and historic meaning.

      Safed was the home of Kabbalists throughout the Medieval era and the Middle Ages but after the Spanish Inquisition expelled its Jews in 1492, hundreds of displaced Jews immigrated to the Land of Israel, among them many of the great kabbalistic scholars of the period. They settled in Safed and the new teachings of Jewish mysticism that eminated from the town earned Safed the name "City of Kabbalah." 

      Today tourists can wander through the area, visiting the Old Jewish Synagogues and viewing some of the sites where much of the Jewish laws, practices and traditions which are known throughout the Jewish world today originated.

      ARI Ashkanazi Synagogue and the ARI Sepharadi Synagogue

      In 1570 Rabbi Isaac Luria, one of the greatest kabbalah scholars of all times, arrived in Safed. Although he only lived in the city for three years before his untimely death, he succeeded in revising the study of Kabbalah to its present-day discipline as a way of viewing the secrets embedded in the Jewish Torah as a way to help man strengthen his relationship with his fellow man and with God. Legend relates that Rabbi Luria, known as The ARI -- The Lion -- sat in the Eliyahu HaNavi synagogue, Safed's largest 16th century synagogue, with Elijah the Prophet who taught the ARI new ways of understanding the mystical traditions of the Kabbalah. After the ARI's death the synagogue was renamed the "ARI Sepharadi" synagogue. It is open daily where visitors can see the cave where the ARI sat with Elijah.

      The Girigos synagogue was built in the 1400s by Jewish exiles who had been forcibly converted to Christianity in Spain and subsequently fled, first to the Isle of Girigos in the Mediterranean and then to Safed. Once in Safed they were viewed with suspicion by the existing Jewish community because of their conversion. They built their synagogue on the outskirts of the town, near a field. The ARI developed the tradition of beginning the Sabbath with a preliminary service, "Kabbalah Shabbat" -- songs, psalms and hymns, which he would sing with his students in the orchard next to the Girigos synagogue. After the ARI's death the Jews of Girigos were integrated into the Safed community and their synagogue was renamed the "ARI Ashkanazi."

      Abuhav Synagogue

      According to local lore the Abuhav synagogue was built in Spain and transported, magically, to Safed by Rabbi Abuhav, a 15th century Kabbalist. Other versions of the story indicate that it was planned in Spain and built in Safed. The Abuhav synagogue is built in the Sepharadi (Mediterranean/North African Jewish) style with the "bima" -- podium -- in the center of the synagogue and the benches for the congregants surrounding the bima. There are seven steps leading up to the bima which correspond, according to Kabbalah, to the six days of the week which culminate in the 7th day -- the Sabbath. The elaborately-decorated synagogue features a high domed ceiling which is framed by etchings and sketchings of animals, birds and plants. The Abuhav synagogue houses two old Torah scrolls which were penned in the 15th/16th centuries. These scrolls are still used on holidays.

      Yosef Caro Synagogue

      Rabbi Yosef Caro is best known as the redactor of the "Shulhan Aruch" -- Code of Jewish Law -- which he wrote with, according to legend, an angel, in a cave below the synagogue that bears his name. Rabbi Caro wanted to create a volume of Jewish Law that could be used by Jewish communities worldwide to continue to follow the laws properly, even after the Spanish Expulsion dispersed these Jews around the world. Today's Yosef Caro synagogue is situated in the midst of the Old Jewish Quarter and is open in the mornings. The cave, below the synagogue, is accessible by the stairs that are situated to the left of the synagogue.

      Virtual Tour

      Today visitors can tour Safed with a smartphone virtual tour which available free of charge.

       

       

       

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 1 year ago
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  • Northhead Lighthouse 2 Northhead Lighthouse 2

    • From: kptjpj
    • Description:

      There is a small parking lot, which takes you to the lighthouse via a short trail, there is a slight incline, but, there are little park benches along the way.  Its not a long walk, maybe 1/8th of a mile, but the benches provide nice views of the camp ground below.  Enjoy

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 196
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  • Point Royal Sunset Point Royal Sunset

    • From: violetwp
    • Description:

      Early this June, we took a road trip to see some of the sights in Utah and Arizona.  One of our first stops was the north rim of the Grand Canyon.  Upon arrival in the early afternoon, we consulted with the visitor center, and were told that Point Royal was indeed a great spot for sunset photography.  So we set out for the hour long trip, stopping along the way to marvel at the scenery.  We arrived at least an hour before sunset, so we hunkered down on one of the benches, clicking a photo every now and then, watching the colors change, and seeing just a few people come and go.  As the time drew near, there was only one other couple there, we were talking in whispers, if at all.  The colors changed with each moment, and just continued to get better.  It was a magic evening, as we ended up by ourselves, marveling at one of the great wonders of the world. 

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 352
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  • Tranquility in Laguna Beach Tranquility in Laguna Beach

    • From: egyptianheidi
    • Description:

      These benches are one of my favorite places to go and sit in Laguna Beach, California.

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 2975
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  • Kids at the Expo Kids at the Expo

    • From: thelastmangoinparis
    • Description:

      A fountain at the Denmark Pavillion at the World Expo provided numerous children with hours of amusement while parents rested on benches sipping drinks.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 301
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  • Vancouver - Stanley Park Vancouver - Stanley Park

    • From: amydishes
    • Description:

      I love how the clouds are descending over the Lions Gate Bridge, surrounded by muted tones of blues, greens, and greys. The 3 empty benches whisper tranquility.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 260
  • Brock Brock

    • From: brockanddina
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 296
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  • melwoods24

    • Points:652
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    • Since: 4 years ago
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  • Stop and smell the roses.... Stop and smell the roses....

    • From: darejb
    • Description:

      While in Europe, one thing I noticed a lot was how people sat down on benches, grass, restaurants just to people watch or be in deep in thought.

      I LOVED THAT!

      Back home (Washington, DC) it's like it's a crime to people watch or just be alone! I was s o glad I could do that in London and Amsterdam without a care in the world. While I did that, I also wrote in my journal. People have told me over and over that I need to start writing but I just never had the time. My job is demanding. I'm always around people. To get alone time, is impossible! So Europe forced me to really stop and smell the roses...

      What beauty! Just to be observant...I'm naturally already observant...it can be annoying for my family and friends but that's my personaility! I noticed so many little things that people probably take for granted. There were A L O T of people travleling alone especially women. I was glad to see that I wasn't alone and pyscho for doing this trip!!! My family and friends couldn't believe it. Are you crazy? Have you seen the movie, "Taken?", etc etc etc. I just had to be strong and ignore their cries :)

      I truly reflected on many things...my life, my career, my future...It was in London that I know I am in a great place now. I love my job!!! So finally I found my career and my calling. Do I want to pursue my doctoral studies in higher education? No idea and I realized a St. James Park while watching the parade that it is O K to not have an answer so I will just simply say, I have no idea!

      We often hear people say you need to stop and smell the roses. I actually did that and glad I did too!

      ~Darian

    • Blog post
    • 4 years ago
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  • Behind North Falls, Silverton, Behind North Falls, Silverton, OR

    • From: Martrese
    • Description:

      The "Trail of Ten Falls" in Silverton, OR, is a relatively easy walk that leads guests behind several tall waterfalls. At 136 feet, North Falls is the third tallest and has benches on the trail behind the falls. Sitting and watching the powerful force of the falls and hearing the roar is quite an experience! A hiker is the small, white speck on the trail to the left of the dead tree.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 363
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  • Two women on a bench, Cuzco, P Two women on a bench, Cuzco, Peru

    • From: awc007
    • Description:

      We found the city of Cuzco to be fascinating, and its people to beautiful and captivating.  These two women were engaged in deep conversation in a local park.  The flowers in the background seem to match perfectly with their traditional clothing.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 1033
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  • Savannah Squares Savannah Squares

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      Historic downtown Savannah, Georgia has at least a dozen 1 block sized squares and is noted for them.  They are very much like miniature parks with benches and are great places to relax and people-watch.  This square is Oglethorpe square.  We rented an apartment on the north side of the square and it was a great location from which to explore the historic district.  Across the street from us was the historic Owens-Thomas house which is one of several historic homes which you can tour.

      We loved our week in Savannah and highly recommend it as a destination.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 513
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  • Hello, Cambodia! Hello, Cambodia!

    • From: ErinNorthington
    • Description:

       

      I love traveling. No. I LOVE traveling. From the moment a trip idea materializes in my brain until the moment I step off the return flight home. I love the planning, debating, talking, and reading about it. I even love paying for airline tickets, hotel rooms and new backpacks. There’s nothing like throwing the bare essentials into a bag, getting on an airplane and knowing you are about to have the experience of a lifetime; good OR bad.

      Nov. 13 Well, I’m in Siem Reap, Cambodia, and so far it’s all good. The moment I stepped off the plane and onto the tarmac I was overwhelmed with humidity, a bug up my nose and the majestic quality of the airport. It was all of one building, lit up like a tiki bar. Once inside you pay $20 (cash only) and they take your passport. After several men ogle you for about seven to nine minutes they hand back the passport with a new visa. After a few more stamps at immigration I headed straight for the front door (no checked baggage for this girl) and was immediately hounded by several men offering taxi rides. But, being the smart cookie I am, instead I found the 5’ tall smiling man holding a sign with my name. Off we went to get in a cab, or maybe a van. But instead of stopping where all the cars were parked we kept walking through the lot and came to a plethora of motorbikes. I thought for sure we would continue and find ourselves at another car lot, but instead the tiny man picked up a helmet and, still smiling, gestured to the seat. “This?” I asked incredulously, thinking surely this was some sort of Cambodian joke. Instead of saying, “are you out of your happy little mind?” I pointed toward my backpack as if to say, “Sorry, muchacho, but your minibike can’t handle my 8 lb. bag.” Unfazed, he pulled it from my hands and set it in a basket on the front of the bike. I did not have a plan B. So, as I threw my leg over the back of the bike I thought, “Mom would kick my a** right now if she saw me,” and hoped to god my instincts were right about this seemingly harmless man with the squeaky voice. We pulled out of the airport (does one runway and tiki hut count as an airport?) onto a dark and carless road. I began to have doubts about trusting this man, thinking that he could take me anywhere and neither I nor anyone I know would have a clue where I was. There are mismatched fences of varying materials along the road, lots of fields, and trees and building that may have been homes, or food shacks, or outhouses. As we continued down the road I began to see more and more motorbikes and realized this is the primary mode of transportation. A dog laid on the side of the road, unconcerned as we whizzed just inches by. We came to a roundabout (and I mean a tiny circle with three possible exits) and in the center was a gold Hindu statute lit up by a chandelier over her head. It was beautiful. We continued along through a town, very few people on the roads, and I noticed several outdoor bar/restaurants, and it reminded me of a small town barbeque where everyone hung out at picnic tables with Christmas lights and plastic cups. I saw women on the back of motorbikes with tiny babies in their arms, loosely hanging on. We passed a very narrow river (more like a stream) and my guide informed me it’s the Siem Reap River. People strolled along the water or sat on benches beneath tiki lights. It had a magical quality. He took me through the bar and restaurant district and for a moment I wished I had someone with me, because going out to a hopping area like that can be intimidating unaccompanied. But I resolved that I would either meet another solo chick traveler or go alone. The hostel I’m staying at is called Bun Kao Guesthouse and it’s at the quiet end of an unlit dirt road with 6 or 7 other hostels cozily called “Mom’s House”, “Good and Kind” and “Home Sweet Home”. I’m already in love with the laid back, tropical feeling here; everything is lit with white and colorful light, there are hammocks in the trees, and there are no doors from the hallways onto the open decks. Shoes are left outside the hostel doors in a porch area but the floors are so clean I don’t mind walking barefoot. The owner of the hostel is another tiny smiling man (I’m thinking this might be a trend) who informs me I have a special room tonight (which means I have two beds) because of a room mix-up. He shows me upstairs and just as I walk into my room I look up to see a lizard on the ceiling. I smile, thinking it must be good luck. I tried to call my parents and Dan, but the wireless is acting up and I lost them several times. So I am doing some writing and getting to bed, exhausted between the 6-hour flight and two-hour time difference. Nov. 14 HAPPY BIRTHDAY, MOM! Wish I was there to give you a big hug, but I got you something from a market instead. Love you!! I woke up at 6:30 (it would be 8:30 Korean time) after a horrible night’s sleep. The mattress I was on is about 4 inches of foam and not that uncomfortable, but the thick heat was. I had breakfast of half loaf of bread with jam and an egg over hard (there wasn’t a choice in the matter). My motorbike driver, Dy (pronounced Dee, who was the man who got me from the airport) arrived at 8 am and off we went. First stop, Angkor Wat. Stunning! The pictures couldn’t do it justice. Despite the oppressive heat and my frizzy hair, I was in heaven. I regret not getting a tour guide at the ticket office (I didn't know you had to ask for one there, it was about 1km away from the first temple) and turning down the Cambodian man who offered to give me a tour for $10. The temple is under major restoration which is great because it would be a shame for it to fall into further ruin. (Built in early 12th century for king Suriyavaram II, first a Hindu then Buddhist temple.) After Angkor Wat I jumped back on Dy's motor bike and we rode to The Bayon, which was a temple to Buddhist king Jayavarman VII. It's known for all the carved stone faces. Then we rode to Ta Prohm which is INCREDIBLE because I imagine this is what the whole world will look like a thousand years from now (should we continue to destroy our Earth the way we are...) There are massive trees growing ON TOP OF the temple. It's INCREDIBLE. I can't even describe what it's like to stand 20 feet below the base of a tree as it's roots push down and around a stone structure and into the ground you're standing upon. The power of nature; it leaves you in awe. I was hungry so Dy took me to a restaurant in the bar district in Siem Reap. The heat made it difficult to finish my vegetable amok and rice, so I boxed it to go. But as I waited for Dy to return a small boy and his blind, one-armed father (I'm just assuming it was his father) came up to me, begging. I didn't want to give them money, so I gave them my food, much to the amusement of the waiters of the outdoor restaurant. (Although it may have been more of annoyance, since I just had them box it up.) I went back to Bun Kao Guesthouse for a much needed shower and power nap, then met with Dy at 4pm and he took me to the Cambodian village which was basically a museum of Cambodia's history and some performances. I watched one performance, but broke away from the crowds and took a walk along the water, stopping to admire yet another wedding party. I noticed that the bride, bridesmaids, groom and groomsmen all wear the same color, even if it's white. Dy was waiting for me, and I told him I was hungry. He asked me if I like dessert. "I love dessert!" I responded, although a "Hell yes!" would have been closer to the truth. We went to an outdoor restaurant with plastic chairs and stray dogs under a tarp roof. We ate (and I'm writing this phonetically) A-Gow-Katee, which is rice balls in a coconut cream with crushed peanuts. Yummy. He also bought me a green drink, although I didn't have it because it was poured over ice cubes and I don't know if they were purified. (From the looks of this joint, nothing is purified.) He told me about himself; he was orphaned as boy when Pol Pot's government killed his mother, father, brother and sister in the Killing Fields. He works with an orphanage who takes in Cambodia children that had been kidnapped and sold into Thailand slavery. He has a wife, two boys and a little girl. Next we went to a juice bar (almost all food establishments are outdoors) and he ordered me a frozen fruit drink called Tu-Gro-Lo, which tasted like green and orange melon. Yum. Next, a night market where I bought my brother and Genevieve something (he won't read this, no surprise spoiled) and bought an elephant statue for Dan and I. I'll have to return tomorrow for more, but I'm running out of backpack space. Might have to mail... I also had my feet "massaged" at Dr. Fish, where hundreds of tiny fish nibble at your feet, eating off the dead skin. The weirdest feeling! I had the hostel owner book me a ticket to Ho Chi Minh City for Monday at 5:45. Tomorrow should be another busy day- Dy will pick me up at 8am. Good night!

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    • 4 years ago
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  • New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Me New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • From: davidhr
    • Description:

      New Mexico's State Memorial for Vietnam Veterans in Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 616
  • New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Me New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Memorial with empty bench, Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • From: davidhr
    • Description:

      New Mexico's State Memorial for Vietnam Veterans in Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 203
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  • New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Me New Mexico Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • From: davidhr
    • Description:

      New Mexico's State Memorial for Vietnam Veterans in Angel Fire, New Mexico

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 210
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  • Travelling to Riga and Jurmala Travelling to Riga and Jurmala, Latvia

    • From: steslatvia
    • Description:

      st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;}

      Riga - capital of Latvia - the most beautiful city in Baltic states. Riga has unique history and architecture for travelers. Riga is the centre of rest, entertainments and shopping for the tourists searching for bright impressions. Riga is a business centre.

      The heart of the city is Old Riga, where are large quantity of sights, historical places, ancient architecture. Charm of old city are stone roadways - storing history of centuries, these are souvenir benches and little shops with amber and ornaments, it is the Dome cathedral with body, these are gold cockerels on spikes of cathedrals, these are the restored ancient small houses with tile roofs, it is special atmosphere of romanticism which is not present anywhere in the world more. Modern night clubs, magnificent restaurants and very cozy Riga’s cafes with live music and the well-known coffee with the Riga balm here have conveniently settled down. The old city falls asleep for a minute, at night here so is populous, as well as in the afternoon.

      Round Old Riga the life is full of hopes, a modern mega city boils. The centre of Riga is not less beautiful, than the most popular corners of the world. The well-known architecture of Jugend style adjoins to business buildings from a steel and concrete. The city channel with romantic park on coast, fountains in squares, the Riga central market, noisy central streets covered with expensive cars, cathedrals in the Gothic style, all is the centre of Riga – city centre of contrasts.

      All can take pleasure in it at any time year and welcome to Riga!

       

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    • 4 years ago
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  • In the Jardin du Luxembourg In the Jardin du Luxembourg

    • From: tkocher
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 316
  • Siem Reap, Cambodia at a Glanc Siem Reap, Cambodia at a Glance

    • From: laratada
    • Description:

      My husband and I spent a few days visiting Siem Reap in December, 2009. It was the second leg of our journey after a visit to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam and on our way to the Philippines via Bangkok. The following is a quick run-down of our itinerary and resources.

      ITINERARY

       

      DAY 1: HCMC to SIEM REAP

      • 45 minute morning flight on Vietnam Airlines from Ho Chi Minh to Siem Reap. We spent more time in the long customs line  than we did in the air. Make sure you're in the correct queue if you purchased an online visa!
      • Find ride or taxi to bring you to Siem Reap and check-in to hotel. We stayed at the unique Hotel Be Angkor–a boutique hotel with only three, stylish rooms in the heart of The Passage in the Old Market area. It's owned by an American who promotes responsible tourism by employing Cambodians and working with the local hospitality training school.
      • Spend the afternoon exploring the city of Siem Reap. Start in the Old Market district to familiarize yourself with the area, make your way to the Central Market, then walk along the river and enjoy the scenery at the Royal Gardens. Loop back to Old Market area down Sivatha Blvd.
      • You can opt to see the sun set with the huge crowds at Angkor Wat or set up a sunrise tour to be introduced to the grounds for the following morning. A full-day tour at Angkor Wat with a private driver and tour guide usually only runs a total of $30-$40 for the whole day. If your tour doesn't include a snack, you can pick up sandwiches and treats-to-go at the Blue Pumpkin.
      • Enjoy a delicious and affordable dinner at a funky restaurant on Pub Street or the Passage. Vegetarians and meat-eaters alike should sample the delicious, flavorful food at Chamkar.
       

      DAY 2: ANGKOR WAT SHORT CIRCUIT
      • If you decide to greet Angkor Wat at sunrise (which I highly recommend), you'll have to wake up early to meet your driver around 5:00 am. Purchase a 3-day pass if you plan to return to the grounds again.
      • Watch the sun rise by one of the temple's moats as Angkor Wat magically reveals itself in the morning. Spend time discovering the temple with barely any crowds in the early morning while most people return back to town to eat breakfast or sleep
      • Grab breakfast at a nearby restaurant on the Angkor Wat grounds.
      • Head to Angkor Thom to admire the stone faces of the Bayon Towers and explore the extensive grounds.
      • Make your way towards the Terrace of the Elephants.
      • Enjoy a Khmer an early lunch at a cafe near the Sra Srang pool. For fresh food, I recommend Heritage Khmer.
      • While bus tours enjoy lunch, visit the temples overtaken by trees at Ta Prohm. This area is made famous by the movie Tomb Raider.
      • Spend the rest of your afternoon exploring some of the smaller temple areas on the short circuit.
      • Return to Siem Reap and arrange a massage or foot rub before enjoying dinner. Stop at Blue Pumpkin to pick up lunch for the next day or for some scrumptious dessert.
      • Shop for souvenirs at the Night Market.
       

      DAY 3: BANTRA SREY & RIVER OF 1,000 LINGAS
      • Hire a car or tuk-tuk (though it will be a longer drive) to bring you further north to visit the intricately carved Bantra Srey, aka Citadel of Women. 
      • Continue on to trail entrance for the River of 1,000 Lingas. It's a 40-minute, scenic hike up the mountain to the river that flows over ancient phallic carvings. There are a couple of benches where you can enjoy lunch and rest.
      • If you make it back down before 1:30, you can take a tour of the Angkor Center for Conservation & Biodiversity (if it's open). Tours to view rescued wildlife are free, but donations are expected.
      • Head back towards Siem Reap, stopping at Landmine Museum or visit some more smaller temples.
       
      • Bring donations to the Green Gecko Project in eastern Siem Reap and visit the inspiring facility that is working to change the lives of local street children. They have a list of items you can donate on their site–a highly recommended visit!
      • Treat yourself to an indulgent dinner at Aha ($7 for a 3-course tapas meal) in The Passage and peruse the contemporary McDermott art gallery next door.
       

      DAY 4: KOMPONG PHLUK & MUSEUM
      • Hire a tuk-tuk driver to bring you to the less touristy stilted village of Kompon Phluk situated 45 km out of town in Tonle Sap.
      • The tuk tuk driver will bring you to the ticket office to pay the entrance fee. From there, you will be taken on a 10-minute ride through dusty, bumpy roads to the boathouse on the back of the available motor bikes at the station.
      • Board your boat to set out through the aquatic vegetation of the Asia's largest fresh-water lake of Tonle Sap. Eventually, you will reach the stilted village and the boatman will let you off in the town for you to explore. It felt a bit intrusive for us to disembark and walk around the town to observe local life when it was obvious we were visitors.
      • Explore more of the lake and return back to your tuk tuk who can bring you to some nearby temples or back to Siem Reap.
      • Enjoy lunch and head to War Musuem or Angkor National Musuem.
      • Spend the rest of the day indulging in spa treatments at a facility like Bodhi. Enjoy your final dinner!

      DAY 5: SIEM REAP TO BANGKOK
      • Check out of hotel and head to airport for flight back to Vietnam or to Thailand via Bankgok Air. Those on a tighter budget or with more time can take a bus to another Cambodian city like Phnom Penh, Vietnam or on the newly paved highway to Thailand.
       

      RESOURCES

      GENERAL:
      Travelfish.org: Handy itinerary, transportation, and lodging tips throughout Asia
      Candy Publications: General tourism guide and listings of Cambodia and Siem Reap
      Cambodia Pocket Guide: Pick up this portable, handy publication when you arrive at Siem Reap for current listings of local business and helpful maps. The printed guide is much more navigable than the online version.

      HOTELS:
      Agoda.com: Site owned by Priceline with great deals on hotel rooms in Asia. Please note rates are low because they often do not include extra amenities like breakfast or all-inclusive options. 

      Angkor Be Hotel: Funky boutique hotel located in The Passage of the Old Market area in Siem Reap with only three rooms, each decorated by a different local artist. Fabulous service and neat setting for those looking for a unique experience. Not the cheapest room in town, but a great value by western standards and they often offer good last minute deals. We got the saffron room for $90 a night with free breakfasts, bottle water, ipod player, flat screen tv, wi-fi, and airport pick-up. They also run a neighboring hotel with one room called The One Hotel.


      RESTAURANTS:
      • Chamkar: Fabulous and flavorful veg restaurant located The Passage -- a popular alley in the Old Market area. Vegetarians and meat-eater unite!
      • Blue Pumpkin: Cafe serving coffee, light meals, pastries, and baked goods. Good place to grab meals-to-go for a day of sight-seeing. They have smaller branches at the Lucky Market mall off Airport Rd. and a branch near Angkor Thom.
      • Aha: Gourmet, tapas-style restaurant with locations in The Passage (by Central Market) and in Hotel de La Paix
       

      AFFORDABLE SPAS:
      • Bodia: Affordable yet stylish spa offering massage and spa treatments in the Old Market Area (near the pharmacy by Blue Pumpkin). After the first visit, they often give you a generous coupon for your next visit.
      • Happy Foot Massage: Cheap, and trust-worthy establishment offering foot massages available but the 1/2 and full hour. I can't remember if this is exactly the name, but it's on the same road as Blue Pumpkin on the other side of the street between the Passage and Pub Street. It has red interior with writing on the walls.
      • Shinta Mani: Hotel run by the Hospitality Institute with great reputation for service and quality.
      • Frangipani Spa: Professional spa with good reputation and moderate prices.

       

    • Blog post
    • 4 years ago
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