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19 Search Results for "bratislava"

  • Bratislava Slovakia bronze man Bratislava Slovakia bronze manhole-man

    • From: amichka
    • Description:
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 412
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  • The Blue Chruch in Bratislava The Blue Chruch in Bratislava Slovakia

    • From: amichka
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    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 277
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  • Bratislava Castle Hill - Slova Bratislava Castle Hill - Slovakia

    • From: amichka
    • Description:
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 281
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  • view of Bratislava from the Ca view of Bratislava from the Castle Hill

    • From: amichka
    • Description:
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 269
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  • Our favorite restaurant in Bra Our favorite restaurant in Bratislava

    • From: LauraK
    • Description:

      This narrow street coming down from Castle Hill revealed our favorite restaurant in Slovakia.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 589
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  • A slice of Bratislava, Slovaki A slice of Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      This street scene in the Old Town area of Bratislava, Slovakia, also provides a glimpse of Bratislava Castle on the hill above 

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 348
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  • Presidential Palace - Bratisla Presidential Palace - Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      An ornate, gated entrance provides an element of drama leading into the grounds of the Presidential Palace in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 220
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  • Crumbling facade - Bratislava, Crumbling facade - Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      This building in Bratislava, Slovakia definitely shows quite a bit of wear and tear and yet still retains a certain rustic charm.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 407
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  • Aging building in Bratislava, Aging building in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      A simple view of an aging brick building with its dramatic arched doorway located in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 281
  • Streetcorner view in Bratislav Streetcorner view in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      A different perspective on your typical streetcorner view in Bratislava, Slovakia.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 263
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  • Personalized Manhole Cover in Personalized Manhole Cover in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      A unique and interesting way to recognize theĀ place where you are walking --- a personalized manhole cover touting the city of Bratislava, Slovakia.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 449
  • Bratislava Cityscape Bratislava Cityscape

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      Bratislava, Slovakia

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 223
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  • Bratislava, Slovakia Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      A unique view from streetside in Bratislava, Slovakia.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 212
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  • Winter Sidewalk in Bratislava, Winter Sidewalk in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      Walking through Bratislava, Slovakia in the Winter.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 314
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  • Winter Day in Bratislava, Slov Winter Day in Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      Snow on the ground and cold temperatures just add to the feel of winter in this black and white shot taken in Bratislava, Slovakia.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 735
  • Winter in Old Town, Bratislava Winter in Old Town, Bratislava, Slovakia

    • From: melpilgrim
    • Description:

      A picturesque, old world lane in the historic area of Bratislava, Slovakia.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 223
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  • Vienna & Prague 2008 Vienna & Prague 2008

    • From: eovering
    • Description:

      [if gte mso 9]> Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui) } [if gte mso 10]> /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} VIENNA 2008, by Edwin Overing 

       

      The actors in this story are:  me, my sister Vinal and her husband Walter Binner who live in Vienna (Vinal taught English as a second language and has several books printed on that subject and Walter was the director of Atomic Energy for Austria), my sister Joanna Overing and her husband Napier Russell (Joanna has a doctors degree in Social Anthropology and is retired from a chair at St. Andrews University, thus she keeps her family name. Napier was a photographer), Bobby Binner, Vinal & Walter’s son, and his wife Roslana and their six year old son Darien (Bobby is with the IAEA in the United Nations and was in Japan for most of September inspecting atomic energy plants).

       

      I left Country Club Village in Hot Springs on Wednesday, September 3, 2008 about 10:15 am Central Daylight Time and arrived in Vienna the next day at 2 pm European Daylight Time (equal to 7 am CDT). I left my car with David Berry and he took me to the Little Rock airport. I flew to Denver on United Airways on an Embraer 145, Lufthansa to Frankfort on an Airbus A340-600 (with two meals with wine included), and Lufthansa to Vienna on an Airbus A320. Vinal and Walter met me at the airport and Vinal drove us to their apartment. After a nap we had a supper of wieners, salad, wine, and apple strudel and watched a movie (well, I didn’t sleep all of the movie).

       

      I waked up about 7 am and thus quickly adjust for the time change. We discussed places to see in Vienna and Prague. Vinal and I took a walk and stopped for some Italian ice cream. Nap. I read and scanned letters from our grand-aunt Vinal Overing Snediker of San Francisco from 1930 to 1964. Most of the letters were to our mother, Wilella Payne Overing. Vinal Snediker is a very good writer and the letters are fascinating.

       

      We went to the American International School open house. We had a chance to chat with Roslana, Darien, and Roslana’s parents.

       

      We took the bus to Kuhlenberg and hiked the trails through the woods between two peaks. There is a great view of Vienna there. We had supper at Nussdorf. I had wiener schnitzel. We returned home by tram and bus.

       

       Vinal and I took a trip by bus and tram to downtown to check on  train schedules.. We then boarded the wrong tram to do some shopping. That was no problem as we found everything we needed anyhow including some maps and fresh rolls, and stopped for a cup of coffee. We spotted a subway station and we rode the train to the Helligenstadt station where we switched to the bus to the Binner’s apartment. I read and scanned a stack of 1939 letters between our parents to and from Colorado and the Carolinas (our Mother , Vinal, Joanna, and I spent the summer and fall in a log cabin on a ranch in Colorado while our Father was training to be a Post Office Inspector).

       

      Vinal and I gassed up the car and shopped in a super-market. In the afternoon we picked up Joanna and Napier at the Vienna airport. This was a great family reunion.

       

      We looked over maps for possible trips to Prague, Bratislava, Moravska Krumlova, Semmering and more. We all had a nap.

       

      Vinal and Joanna went shopping in the farmer’s market. Napier and I went along as sack carriers. They picked up potatoes, carrots, plums, beans, and chicken. We ate lunch at a café near the market and had wieners with cheese with a roll and coffee. Today was Walter’s birthday!

       

      Joanna, Napier and I went to the Ring (downtown Vienna) by bus and underground. We walked through the Burggarten and stopped for some coffee. We visited the Kunsthistorisches Museum (Art Museum) to see paintings by Peter Brueghel the Elder and his sons and grandsons. We walked through the Volksgarten and ate lunch in a café in the park. We walked on to the Stephensplatz. It is now quite touristy. (Note that taking a vacation with Overings usually include lots of walking.)

       

      We spent all day in the Binner apartment talking, reminiscing, and planning.

       

      We went to three concerts at the Wiene Konzerthaus on Lothringerstrasse. Timna  Breuer (singer) and Elias Meiri (instruments) presented various European children’s  folk songs. Next there was a presentation by Daniel Hope on the violin and Josephine Knight on the cello of Czech Jewish music written in concentration camps (most composers died there). The largest concert was Kantorenkonzert by the Slowakische Philharmonic Kolot, with Kantors Shmuel Barzilai and Benzion Biller, Dirigent (Director) Mordechei Sobol, Moderation (Announcer) Paul Chaim Eisenberg, and a male chorus. All of the concerts were good and the Kantorenkonzert was really great.

       

      We all packed for the trip to Prague. I did some more scanning on the computer of family letters.

       

      We took the bus and subway trains to Sudbahnhof (Southern Train Station) to take the train to Prague. The scenery between Vienna and Prague was interesting. On arrival we changed some Euro to Krona and bought transportation passes good for three days. We managed the Underground to arrive within a block from the Pension Tara on Halvelska (street) and just a couple of blocks from Wenceslas Square. We found a pub to eat supper with huge glasses of beer (Czech beer is said to be the best in the world).

       

      The next morning we found a restaurant that has breakfast specials between 8 and 9 am. We found the food was good. We saw most of the usual things that tourists see in Prague:  Old Town Square, the Astronomical Clock, Charles Bridge, Prague Castel, the Golden Lane (once home to the author Franz Kafka), Wenceslas Square, the Old Jewish Cemetery, old/new Synagogues, Tyn Church, Church of St. James, Havelska Market. A special treat was the Mucha Museum, one of Europe’s most enjoyable little museums. Alfons Mucha was a founding father of the Art Nouveau movement. We had a great dinner at the Czech restaurant Hoctinec U Kalicha. The food was wonderful and we brought enough duck and ham home for two more meals. This was a top notch way to celebrate Vinal’s birthday.

       

      We all rested from the trip. I transferred photos from camera to an USB flash stick. We all had naps!

       

      We went back to farmer’s market to refill the cabinets and fridge with items to be cooked.

       

      We went to Ring again, this time to the Albertina to see the Van Gogh display of some 140 paintings. WOW!

       

      One day was set aside to see the Tiergarten (Schönbrunn Zoo). This has to be one of the best zoos in the world. It would take about five days to see the entire zoo. The presentations are great.

       

      We drove to an almost unknown town of Moravska Krumlova in the Czech Republic. The town is very interesting and we should have allowed more time there. The big thing to see is the Moravska Krumlova Palace which holds twenty huge murals by Mucha which will be soon is to be moved to Prague.

       

      Napier and I walked through the Dog Park and the Turkenschanzpark (Turkish Park) for a great outing.

       

      We went to Belvedere to view the showing of paintings by Klimpt, Schiele, Kodsschka, Monet, Renoir and more. The trip was also interesting as we traveled by tram through the heart of Vienna and was able to see much more than from the trains.

       

      We went by train to Semmering, a small town in the eastern Alps. We walked through the town. It seemed that we were going uphill all of the time even though we started and ended at the train station. We enjoyed the views, the chateaus, the fancy hotels, the ski trails and lifts. It was a fun day.

       

      Bobby had been in Japan inspecting atomic plants for the previous several weeks. He was able to join us for supper.

       

      Joanna and Napier went to the airport to fly to Edinburgh. They had a two hour drive ahead of them from Edinburgh to St. Andrews.

       

      Vinal, Walter and I took the train to the airport. I checked in and we had time for coffee and rolls before I went through the carry-on checking point and passport checking. The flight to Frankfort was on time, but the flight from Frankfort to Denver was delayed several hours and Frankfort has no where to sit down until one has checked in with the boarding card.  The flight was fine after we started. We had two meals and had a chance to see Greenland with snow lit with full sun. In Denver instead of waiting several hours I had to rush through Customs, Passports, and all to make to flight to Little Rock. Somehow we arrived in Little Rock on time and David Berry picked me up and also provided a bed to sleep in which I appreciated after such a long trip along with taking care of my car while I was away. I arrived the next morning in time for breakfast at Country Club Village after being away for a month.

       

      A GREAT TRIP!

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
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  • Bratislava Boatel Bratislava Boatel

    • From: bberwyn
    • Description:

      An odd floating barge serves as a hotel on the Danube in Bratislava, with terrific views of passenger ships and barges heading upstream toward Vienna and downstream to Budapest.

    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 1791
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  • Eurail: Texel to Piran, via Wa Eurail: Texel to Piran, via Waffleland!

    • From: bberwyn
    • Description:

      Bruxelles jaunt yields tasty treat that can't be beat

      Belgian Waffle

      After a bike marathon on the Dutch island of Texel, we decide that a Belgian Waffle, slathered with cream, fruit and syrup, sounds darn good. Leigh breaks out the Eurail map and timetable, and within a few minutes, we have a plan. On the train, we laugh about our waffle craving and daydream about a mythical Waffleland theme park, where all the attractions are modeled on the fried treats. Hey, there's a Legoland nearby, so why not a waffle theme? We're not sure it exists, but if it did, it would be Shangri La for waffleheads like us, and every good trip has a mission.

      Between train connections in Amsterdam, we stroll the downtown, getting sidetracked by a slice of pizza. Then it becomes an Amazing Race scene, as we sprint through the massive construction zone at Centraal Station to catch our train.

       Leigh solves the maze and we end up at the right platform just in time to board. We joke about the extra-long, double vowels in every other word — just throw 'em in there, it doesn't cost one European cent.In Bruxelles, we're pretty sure we've disembarked at the wrong station. Above the escalator, panels droop from the ceiling with electrical wires hanging down, and some of the faux-marble slab benches have been ripped apart, as if someone needed a chunk of the rock for a backyard home improvement project.

      Can this really be the capital of the European Union, we wonder, suddenly realizing we got off one stop too soon.

      The lead skies split apart briefly as we walk toward the hostel, and the grimy bourgeouis facades miraculously change hue, from gray to brick- red. The waffle shops are closed, as far as we can tell, and Leigh calls it a night. I take a walk around the block, marveling at the hodge-podge of culture and languages; French-speaking Africans share a beer and a smoke with Russian stock brokers, while Arab vendors dish out falafels to traveling salesmen from Pakistan and Ireland.I'm raring to go the next morning. Overly enthusiastic, I accidentally wake Leigh just before dawn. Big mistake. But don't get me wrong, Leigh is an all-star travel partner: Creative, patient, spontaneous and kind. She's a stellar companion, lover and friend, and dead-sexy to boot, but she doesn't like to get up before the sun. "I knew that," I mumble beneath my breath, watching as she gathers her gear, brushes and flips her hair, all in about two minutes flat, while suggesting that I take a hike.

      "I knew that," I mumble beneath my breath, watching as she gathers her gear, brushes and flips her hair, all in about two minutes flat while suggesting that I take a hike.

      But our morning walk beneath exquisite Baroque facades soothes the waters, especially after we drop our packs in a locker at the station and finally track down the sought-after confection in a cozy joint near the Grande Place. The deluxe waffle comes with scoops of ice cream, fruit compote, whipped cream and syrup, and for dessert, we try some crepes.  Just around the corner, Mannequin Pis is cheerfully spurting a steady stream while grinning angelically at the rooftops. Today he is wearing a natty red vest in honor of some ethnic celebration in this multi-ethnic city. Maybe he's making fun of the fact that, if you don't have exact change, you too will be peeing in the street. Baroque

      It's murky-gray in the Benelux, so we're starting to think about the sunny south. Leigh finds a winding connection through Luxembourg, Trier and Koblenz that will put us on an overnight train to Munich, with a transfer on to Salzburg and Linz, in Austria.

      In Luxembourg we agree that pay toilets are not one of Europe's great contributions to world culture. You can use a cell phone text function to buy candy in a vending machine, but when it comes to public sanitation — look out, you'd better have the right coins in your pocket. An afternoon cloudburst sends us scurrying to shelter in the arched hallway of a convent. We drip dry as a passing nun gives us a curious stare. On the bright side, we have a few hours to enjoy seafood platters and mounds of pasta at a family style Italian place in an alley near the station, next to a couple of go-go girl clubs and a car parts store. The wait staff treat us like family in a way that only Italians do, acting disappointed when don't inhale every last strand.

      The train to Munich is a Eurail special. As the station manager adds on extra cars, we find a compartment and stretch out a bit awkwardly on the spring-loaded, straight-back seats. Before dozing off to the clickety-clack of railroad ties and passing powerline poles, I ponder the fact that everybody trying to sleep on planes, trains and in station waiting rooms ends up looking like one of those grotesque Pompeii cinder figures, all arched backs and twisted arms, sometimes cradling the head of a loved one. It sounds macabre, but it's really more of an ode to the art of travel.

      July 12: Market mushrooms

      With seamless transfers, we arrive in Linz in time to buy a bucket of luscious gooseberries and fresh chanterelle mushrooms at the Saturday morning market. 

      Austria's Second City, sprawled along the Danube, is bustling on a fine summer weekend, but we beeline for Aunt Erika's apartment, eager to do laundry and nap in a comfortable bed. The next morning we pack up and head downtown, stopping at the Hauptplatz for an ice cream and Prosecco at the Garda Cafe. A gilded statue, honoring the Holy Trinity for deliverance from the plague, hovers above the scene. The ice cream parlor specializes in creating sweet sundaes that look like savory food. One dish features strands of vanilla covered with strawberry sauce to mimic spaghetti, while another uses peach halves, whipped cream and pools of vanilla sauce to create a convincing likeness of sunnyside-up eggs.linz ice cream.jpg

      BoatelGenerally heading east and south, we roll to Vienna, jump on the subway and find a speedy hydrofoil heading for Bratislava on the Danube River. After a night in a floating Boatel, we walk the length of the town to the railway station, where we consider trains to Zagreb and Budapest, although our plans change when we hear about the Hungarian train strike, with unspecified delays expected. The automated teller in the station is covered with bird poop, and one of the vendors is selling two-inch thick wedges of what looks like bacon pie, with slices of sausage layered on top for good measure. Our best bet is back to Vienna, a main crossroads where we'll have more choices of trains.

      A serendipitous and unspoken agreement puts us aboard an express headed for Croatia. We're not sure exactly where we'll end up, but we hop on as the train pulls away. Not worrying about it too much, we settle in the dining car, where a wry waiter keeps us well-supplied with icy Croatian beer and an appetizing platter of air-dried ham, country cheeses, farm bread, peppers and pickles. It's a welcome meal, and we toast to the freedom of the rails, chugging up the steep grades of Slovenia's Julian Alps.

       

       

       

      Dragon BridgeJuly 14: The dragon bridge

      If Ljubjlana was ever truly behind the Iron Curtain, Llublana has shed every link to that drab past. The city hums with international energy. At the Park Hotel, I ride the elevator with a group of four men, all from different countries. in fluent German, they discuss the U.S. political campaigns. We set out to explore the old town center and scope the bronze dragons on the bridge across what was once surely a protective moat around the castle. In the sprawling open-air market, not everything is as it appears. A batch of bright orange apricots turns out to be dry and mealy, while the purple Italian plums are riddled with worms! So much for the myth of market produce being the best.

      The promise of sunshine lures us farther south, and the newest plan is to head for the nearest seaside. As we skim through the Eastern Europe Edition of Let's Go, we spot a world heritage cave site. Plenty of daylight left, so we jump off in Divaca. The musty hilltop town has been a crossroads since Roman times. It's still strategic, straddling the main freeway between huge Italian seaports and the entire Balkan penninsula. Much of the recent burgeoning trade in the expanding European Union passes through this corridor. We pop into a pub near the station, seeking a bus to the Skocjan Caves. The last one is gone and time is getting short, so we offer the local lads what we think is a fair price for a ride. We jostle around a foosball table for a quick game. They laugh and nod, suggesting that they would take us — if they only had a car.

      Even cowgirls get the blues ...Let's Go has concise directions suggesting we can walk the stretch in less than an hour, so we hit the pavement. We throw our thumbs out in the air with a Sissy Hankshaw attitude. The sassy hitchhiking heroine in Tom Robbins' 1976 classic (Even Cowgirls Get the Blues) taught us that you gotta keep on truckin', no matter what life throws your way. A couple of cars swerve to the curb, but neither they, nor we, are sure we're all headed in the same direction, so we walk. We  miss the last tour of the day and settle for ice cream as a consolation prize. 

      The region is geologically well-known as a significant limestone uplift — a karst landscape — carved into gorges and caves by mountain streams. For residents during the stone and bronze ages, the site was sacred. It was a place of emergence and spiritual renewal, amazingly similar to Hopi beliefs in the American Southwest, or the Mayan theology practiced in caves and cenotes of what are now Mexico and Belize.

      A nature trail from the visitor center leads us back to town along a more scenic and direct route, along the rim of the gorge and then through the old settlements outside the center. Along the path is a Romanesque chapel crumbling in the ivy. The site isn't described in our guidebook, but we can feel that the grounds have been hallowed for centuries. Across the highway, a pair of locals lounge near their cars, trunks open to display mounded boxes of fresh forest blueberries.  We can't resist, and along with our berries, we get a short lecture  on the ancient and recent history of the northern Balkans.We savor the tart berries as we board the train headed to Piran, a Slovenian fishing village that fills a skinny spit of land between Italy and Croatia.

       


       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 3346
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