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128 Search Results for "clock"

  • Iceland Thru the Clock Iceland Thru the Clock

    • From: stormygirl
    • Description:
    • 4 months ago
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  • Stepping back in time Stepping back in time

    • From: kclue8
    • Description:

      The Clock Tower Gate to Cartagena's Old Town on Colombia's Caribbean coast perfectly represents the beauty and history that awaits visitors.

    • 5 months ago
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  • Amresh

    • Points:652
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    • Since: 9 months ago
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  • Qingdao Qingdao

    • From: x123456
    • Description:

      The old town of Qingdao is very special, with a lot of European-style architectures there. Almost across each mountain, there are some parks and also some residences of celebrities. If you stay in a hotel in Qingdao, it’s better to choose the one near to the sea because in autumn, there are a lot of beautiful landscapes that you are able to see anytime when walking out of your hotel. 
         
      The trestle of Qingdao, located in the south of Zhongshan Road where there are a number of tourists, is built over a gulf for visitors to board the sightseeing ship to cruise on the river.

      The trestle is as old as some of the buildings in Qingdao. In Qing Dynasty, an imperial envoy Li Hung-Chang came to Qingdao to inspect. During that time, he wanted to take a big ship there, but since Qingdao was a very small village where there was no port, the ship could not be parked. A harbor which was later built for temporarily use and rebuilt for several times is not a port any more now but an art gallery where some of art works are exhibited.

      What’s more, the trestle is the symbol of Qingdao which is a must-visit scenic spot. At the end of the trestle is a pavilion which looks really special against the European-style buildings around it, with double eaves of Chinese traditional styles on the roof. The trestle which is situated over the gulf is 440 meters long and 8 meters wide with concrete structures. At the south part of it is a half round jetty. There is an attic with eight corner angles where tourists are able to see layers of waves surging. The attic has bee approved as one of the best scenic spots in Qingdao. On the other hand, the night views around the trestle are much more beautiful in daytime than in nighttime.                

      The Christian church in Qingdao is a well-known religious building located at Road 15, near to Xinhao Shan Park in the east where there are magnificent landscapes.
      The wide and flat square in front of the church looks very magnificent against a forest and all kinds of western-style architectures around it. Stepping onto narrow steps, you will see its strong walls, half round window frames, pitched roofs and bell tower.

      The Christian church is a typical German-style building composed of a bell tower and an auditorium. The bell tower on which you are able to have a bird view of sea views is 39.10 meters high, with a huge clock on there that makes the solemn church mysterious. On the other hand, the auditorium which is composed of two floors, with delicate decoration of the interior looks very special and accommodates thousands of people at a time.     

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    • 1 year ago
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  • A trip in Qinghuangdao Isalnd A trip in Qinghuangdao Isalnd

    • From: x123456
    • Description:

      I was planning to go to Qinghuangdao Island located in the northeast of Heibei Province in China. I took a train from Beidai River to Shanhaiguan, a scenic area in Qinghuangdao City which has some parts of the features of ancient Great wall, after I bought a train ticket in Beijing at 9 o’ clock in the morning. At the Liuzhuang Village, I took the bus number 34 to the Coastal Bus Station, where there are buses number 22 and number 5 going to the train station of Beidai River. I got off from the number 34 bus and then a few minutes later comes the bus number 22. I just got on the bus without studying any difference of the routes between the bus the number 5 and the bus number 22. However, I was told that there are 8 more bus stops if I take the bus number 22 rather than the number 5 bus to the train station. Having compared the bus route of the bus number 22 with that of the bus number 5 on the map, I was a little worried about whether I have enough time to get to Shanhaiguan, since I thought that it would take 1 hour for the bus number 22 to pass 27 bus stops. However, it took only half hour. In the waiting room, I waited for 40 minutes, during which I got a little hungry and got some food to eat. Half hour later, I arrived at the shanhaiguan train station by bullet train. Out of the exit, I saw there was a bus stop opposite. I took the bus number 25 to Laolongkou bus stop and I got off there. Across a crossroad, I came to a scenic area called Laolongkou. Beside the road, there is a garden where people were taking photos. Since it’s much earlier than I had thought, I went to a small restaurant and ordered a pancake with smoked meat in it and a cool noodles to eat. It spent me 25 Yuan in total. The food there was ok. I was not going to buy tickets to visit parks, but was just walking around, hoping that I would find a way to the sea. On the map, I found the way at the south of the crossroad. I was walking along the road and went through a defensive wall. After a few minutes, a beach came into my sight. There, the locals run the business like riding horses on the beach. I felt the sand is very soft somewhere on the beach, as I walked down to the beach covered with sundried seaweeds as well as some pebbles. As I kept walking to the south of the beach, I came to the scenic area Laolongtou Defensive Wall, but I didn’t go inside. Instead I walked to a rock near the sea, on which there are a lot of sea snails and shells. I sat down on the one sea waves could not impact on, just to have a good look at the sea before I left Qianghangdao Island. A yacht went by me at a quick speed, with white waves behind. At further distance, different-sized ships were sailing on the sea, with the sunlight shinning on it.

                                 

      When I passed by the train station nearby by bus number 21, I saw very high defensive walls and gate buildings. Since I stayed in Xian for 7 years, they are very familiar to me when I saw them. Getting off at the yingwen bus stop, I planned to have lunch, but the restaurant I went to had been pulled down. Therefore, I had to go shopping with an empty stomach. Going through the city gate of Yingenmen, I saw the West Street where shops are all designed very traditionally with woods. At the end of the street, there is a tourist attraction that is visited each by people from around the world. A friend of mine took a picture of me in front of an ancient building and the trip was almost over. Having looked at time, I found that there was much more time left for me to walk around, than I had thought before, so I just took my time to do it. Every few minute, I could see simple retail shops which have no fence, with a broad at the door on which its retailed goods are written in white chalk. As time went by, it’s dinner time.

       

      The trip in Qinghuangdai Island ended at 8 pm with my having dinner at a restaurant with a good view.

       

       

       

       

       

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    • 1 year ago
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  • New Delhi hotels-Offering Extr New Delhi hotels-Offering Extraordinary Hospitality Services

    • From: manojihpl
    • Description:

      Delhi, the capital city of India, is not only the hot seat of politics in today’s time but  has been the same for the past many centuries. The city is a perfect and may be the finest amalgamation of various traditions, castes, religion and communities. Therefore, it boasts of being home to innumerable religious monuments. That is not all as it also has a number of historical buildings too. Another thing for which this metropolitan city is well-known all across the world is because of its lip-smacking food. The eclectic mix of Old and New Delhi is the best example of a blend of modernity and traditionalism.

      Both local and foreign pay a visit to this city, every year all round the year. In order to meet the preferences as well as pocket of all kinds of travelers, there are ‘n’ number of New Delhi hotels.  These hotels have been segregated into a few categories and are sprinkled all across the city. The classification is done not according to the quality but the quantity of personalized services that they offer. All kinds of hotels,  star-rated (5 star, 4 star or 3 star), economy or budget, are known for offering extraordinary hospitality services to the guests.

      You can actually Enjoy a luxurious stay in New Delhi hotels. Just take a pick of your the hotel which you think suits your pocket and your needs, from the list of numerous hotels. Every hotel is very well-known for providing excellent services to both business as well as leisure traveler. Whatever the category of New Delhi Hotels is, you can be assured of availing a pleasant stay, in the one that you are going to opt.  

      New Delhi Hotels


       

       

       

      Delhi is not only one of the destinations of Golden Triangle tour but is also visited by many dignitaries being the political hub of the country. Thus every year, the city is visited by a large number of travelers for varied reasons. All New Delhi  hotels  offer world-class services and facilities to its guests. Although  these visits happen all around the year but  otherwise for a traveler, the best time to visit the city starts from the month of October and is till the month of November. The main reason is the pleasant weather during this time period.

      Since there has been great advancement in technology, you can actually booking a room in a hotel, right from the comfort of your home. Go online and search that also saves a lot of your precious time. Doing the booking in advance is always the best thing to do so that you can avoid any kind of last minute hassles. You can get details about the cost, availability, accommodation, dining options, and other kinds of necessary details too.

      Any kind of a traveler can easily experience luxury of New Delhi because of the kind of services and facilities that they provide that are divided into hotel and room facilities. The list of such amenities is long. One is offered round the clock room service, attached bathrooms with all necessities, medical, parking beauty and laundry services, mini bar, refrigerator, AC and non-AC rooms, library, business, banquet or conference halls, Satellite TV or LCD, one or many multi-cuisine restaurants, fitness center, shopping arcade, spa, recreational center and more. Many hotels also provide car rental as well as travel assistance too by the way of their travel desk. 

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    • 2 years ago
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  • A trip to WeiZhou Island A trip to WeiZhou Island

    • From: j123456
    • Description:
      Although it looked like a cloudy day today in BeiHai city, the weather got better after we had arrived at Weizhou Island by water. One hour later, we reached the destination. We spent three days and three nights there. At about 5 clock in the afternoon on the twenty second of November, we landed on the island and at 5 pm on the 25th, we left. In the three days on the island, we sleep till waking up each day, sometimes stroll around nice scenic spots, are in a daze for a little bit, walk for a while, have a bike ride, pick up shell, and walk the dog. What is important is that we had fresh seafood to eat. What a leisurely and comfortable vacation. 
          About the accommodation on the island, it seems that we didn’t have many choices but Youth Hostel called ZhuZai Ba is our only choice and since we all know about hostels, we then made the decision to stay. Spending a night at a fisherman’s family was never considered, because we know nothing about its environment and something like that. We contacted with the boss there on the Internet to reserve a room, but since we were not sure on which date we would land on the island, we just made an oral contract with him. Anyway, “since it’s in a dull season, there are rooms anytime” the boss said. Having bought sea passage tickets, we started out.
          The ship having arrived at the dock, we met up with the rider of the tricycle and got on. After a while, we began officially landing on the island.
          After that, it’s when the sun goes down. Putting down our luggage in the hostel, we rushed out. Across a road, it’s a beach and we saw the sunset on the WeiZhou Island.
          Afterwards, dinner had been reserved in advance, before we had dinner together. The younger sister of the boss AHong is charge of cooking meal for us. She went to the market , bought some seafood like fish and crab and cooked for us. Her cooking skill was so good, with the GuangDong style, that we liked it very much and ate all. Since she has a good cooking skill, we decided to stay here for the rest of the days.
      in the morning of the following day, we had steamed bun with soya-bean milk and went to the market to buy some seafood. After that, we give it to AHong to cook it for us. For each meal, it’s different . crab is stemmed or sometimes fried with yolk or green onion. For fish, it’s stemmed sometimes and some other time braised in soy sauce. Shell is stemmed or sometimes fried. If we go out to have a fun and are late for buying food, we can give her a call to ask her to do it for us. At night, we reserved a seafood barbecue as our night snack and it’s so delicious.
          Moreover, There are about ten thousand residents living on the WeiZhou Island with one fifth of believers, where there are two churches, the catholic church and the chapel of Our Lady. Church is the symbol of missionaries.
      The chapel of Our Lady of France is a small typical church with the gothic style of Europe, with three floors of a square bell tower in front engraved with the three words Chapel of Our Lady, and an oblong house of god and two floors of a small building behind the tower. And perhaps because of the small-sized church located at a remote place, few people go there.
          The symbolic church on the island is the catholic church, which is already a scenic spot where there were so many people inside without tranquility and holy, and a few of buses parking by there. Finally we met up with our team group, and took some photos and left before the next group of people came.
           The church with a hundred years history, a gothic architecture in the renaissance of France was built with the corallites on the island, composed of the church, Men and women monastery, hospital, priest building, and mother and baby room.
          The Volcano Park is an important scenic spot on the island where there is a lighthouse guiding the way of the fishing-boat. Standing under the lighthouse, we can see the whole view of the South Bay.
         The Crocodile Mountain Park is where marine abrasion and volcanic lava often happen. Walking along the sea, we can see the pelelith. On that morning, the weather was bad, very cloudy. I ran into a group of children who was sketching a beautiful view.
         Located in the east, The Sesame Beach is also called the Colorful Beach, where it’s optimum to watch the sunrise. It got famous because of its white and black sand. And we can also catch some crabs in the evening.
         It’s really an unforgettable experience.

      http://www.chinaholidaycts.com/
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    • 2 years ago
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  • Montreal fireworks Montreal fireworks

    • From: gmaso
    • Description:

      I stumbled upon the 2012 Montreal International Firework competition while on a business trip. I missed most of the display but the 15 minute or so I saw were worth it.  The clock tower and Jacques Cartier Bridge are in the background.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 633
  • Montreal fireworks Montreal fireworks

    • From: gmaso
    • Description:

      I stumbled upon the 2012 Montreal International Firework competition while on a business trip. I missed most of the display but the 15 minute or so I saw were worth it.  The clock tower and Jacques Cartier Bridge are in the background.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 664
  • Low Cost Eating options in Gum Low Cost Eating options in Gumusluk, Bodrum Peninsula, Turkey

    • From: rovingjay
    • Description:

      Where and What is Gumusluk?

      Gumusluk is in the northern corner of the peninsula, and takes about 40 minutes to reach, via dolmus, from Bodrum Town.

      It's famous for it's fish restaurants, not only with European Tourists, but the literati that pour into this corner of Turkey, from Izmir, Anakara and Istanbul each summer.

      The main hub of restaurants are clustered along the Gumusluk's harbour, and have a waterside view of Rabbit Island. At peak times during dinner, and weekend, these restaurants are throbbing with activity, and you may have a wait, at the restaurant of your choice.  Reputation and location help drive the price of meals in this destination, but if you want to visit Gumusluk, but not break the bank there are still plenty of options available to you.

      Gumsuluk Belediyesi Tea House

      The Tea House is open round the clock, and is the perfect location to enjoy a glass of tea, or Turkish Coffee.  Frequented by locals, this establishment is operated by the local municipality, and offers refreshments at a fraction of the price charged by some of it neighbours.  While it isn't directly on the harbour's edge, it is close by, and there's a view from the tables at the front.

      Dalgic Restaurant

      In the same neighbourhood as the Tea House is a row of covered row of beach shops and bakkals,  and here you'll find the Dalgiç Restaurant.  This local restaurant has been serving traditional Turkish dishes for over 15 years.  They're also open 24 hours during the summer time, and have plenty of covered seating.

       

      Gumusluk Beach

      If you wander past the harbour, through the covered row of beach shops, you'll reach the other side of Gumusluk Bay.  The beach is lined with bars, restaurants and pensions, and the vibe is decidedly more chilled along here.  At night, the sun loungers are tidied away, and the tables and chairs are set up along the sand.  Pensions offer a broad selection of home cooked specialities, at a lower cost than the harbour front restaurants.  So it's worth wandering a little bit off the beaten path, to explore your culinary options.

      After Dinner

      Before heading home, make sure to stop at the collection of craft stalls just behind the harbour.  Here you'll find an ecclectic mix of hand made crafts, that you won't find anywhere else on the peninsula.  There's no hard sell, and it's a perfect place to walk off your dinner, and buy yourself a unique gift.

       

       

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    • 2 years ago
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  • Bangkok Travel Guide Bangkok Travel Guide

    • From: arpita
    • Description:

       

      Bangkok is the capital city of Thailand and is also the largest city in the country. Bangkok is one of the biggest cosmopolitan cities in Asia and has a population of around 11 million. It is widely known as Bangkok's political, spiritual and cultural hub. The city is huge in terms of space and population. It is also known as a traveler friendly city with bustling commercial and political centers located around the various districts dividing the city.

      Climate

      Bangkok has a tropical climate and rain lashes the city quite frequently. Due to the humidity, the city remains hot and humid most of the time. Foreign visitors would be well advised to book a hotel with around the clock air conditioning as the summers can be extremely hot. The city is often covered with haze contributed by the weather and the air pollution generated by the hundreds of vehicles. The people of Bangkok are known for their hospitality and that is why, despite the climate issue, thousands of visitors throng to the various attractions of the city.

      Getting Here
      Most of the visitors arrive in the city through the Suvarnabhumi Airport, as it has now become the busiest airport of the country. The airport offers all the international airport facilities like travelers lounge, internet and telephone services etc. From the airport, most of the people use taxis to move to their destinations around the city. Metered taxis are also available for cheap traveling around the city. 

      Moving Around
      Inside the city, the travel options are huge for a first time traveler. Public bus transport system is available in the city and is a cheap option for moving around. You can also move around in private cars but be aware that the traffic in Bangkok is quite hectic and messy. In order to ease the traffic congestion, Bangkok has recently introduced the sky train. The sky train covers most of the downtown Bangkok areas and towns, and gives you some relief from the traffic congestion. Bangkok also has the metro which can be used in place of the sky train. Boat rides around the city are also very common and will take you to various points around the city in least possible time. Tuk Tuk is also a very common transport means around the city.Flights To BangKok

      Major Attractions
      Some of the major attractions of the city include a visit to the old city areas. You can visit various temples of Bangkok; the most famous being Grand Palace, which is one of the biggest in the city according to its size. Wat pho is also a must visit temple, which houses largest reclining image of Buddha. Other temples include the Golden Mount and Wat Rajnadda. You can also visit the various museums in the city which gives an insight into the cities past and history. You can visit the National Museum and the Museum of Siam in order to relive some history of the city. Lumpini Park is one of the largest parks in the city and can be visited in order to get away from the congestion of the city.

      Food           
      Bangkok is famous for its Thai cuisine. Food is relatively expensive in the city and it is of high international standard. You will also find top class international cuisine in the city which will surely add to the flavor of the foods. Phad Thai, Northeastern Thai, Ya Dong and bugs are some of Bangkok traditional food items. Dinner cruises are also quite famous among visitors, and eating while on boat ride in Chao Phraya is one of the experiences that should not be missed.

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    • 2 years ago
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  • Puebla, 72 Hour Express Puebla, 72 Hour Express

    • From: EricRojo
    • Description:


      After a great 3 day marathon in Puebla, the great Popocatepetl (Smoking Mountain in Nahuatl) bade me farewell with a magnificent spectacle of steam and ash brightened by the early morning sun as it hiccupped as it has for many centuries. Snowcapped alongside theIztaccíhuatl (Sleeping Woman) they frame the Valley of Puebla with eternal beauty.

      As a frequent visitor to Puebla taking in this view gave me pause to review what happened in the last three days between business meetings and planning for the visitors that will arrive son to celebrate Cinco de Mayo in Puebla.

      This bright Sunday morning I arrived in the direct flight from Houston and headed to check in at the Camino Real Hotel in the heart of downtown Puebla. Once installed, met my colleague in the project and headed to my favorite Sunday stop, the flea market at the Los Sapos (Toads) fountain park. There looked for antique toys, books, helmets, medals, coins, jewelry surrounded by dozens of many other old and new items that make for a great start of the day. This area of downtown Puebla has sprawled over the last ten years to the many colonial era streets that connect Los Sapos with the Zocalo or main plaza, the Parian, the artists’ colony; the gran crafts market leaving only space to walk and marvel at what is new almost with every visit. There are a growing number of boutique hotels, carved out of decaying colonial buildings and old homes, each with a unique style and competing cuisine. There are many vendors of food, snacks, popular and high end restaurants.  The Zocalo, border by arched portal buildings on three sides –these with every form of eating establishment-, and the magnificent cathedral on the other, is a pedestrian paradise on Sunday. Children play, there are great offers of colorful balloons and many other toys, concerts and many other activities.  We were met by other friends as we replicated the walking tour we planned for our visitors, tasted mole, candies, took a peek at many of the monuments, stopped for lunch at a preselected traditional kitchen restaurant and enjoyed judging the various options offered by the owner and settling for one of Puebla’s signature dishes “Chiles en Nogada”. After we made our way to have coffee with an old friend who owns and produces some of the most magnificent pieces and sculptures in the Talavera pottery style that is unique to Puebla. We talked about his production of special Talavera pieces with Cinco de Mayo themes and motifs, for special gifts and to offer to visitors during and after the festivities. Someone mentioned that later we could attend and open air concert by a known contemporary singer and an open air play showing life in Puebla in the XVIIth century. We decided that there was time to see the plan and catch the end of the concert. On our way, we stopped to have a “pasita” (a raisin) which is a tradition to stop and have a shot glass of this raisin liqueur dispensed at a rather quaint shop that seems to have thousands of objects and probably sells other things, but the lines are to have a “pasita” as a rite of passage for visitors and locals alike. As we continue walking making our way to the candy street (one of Puebla’s great products is it immense variety of candies and chocolates, set side by side with dozens of locally imagined fruit liquors) we browse through antique shops, colonial furniture; we stop at City Hall, a rather handsome neoclassic building where a placard tells us that at this site in April of 1863, who after a month long siege –almost a year after the famous battle- they refused to surrender to the French army that was twice the force of that of 1862. Our meandering takes to the larger crafts market of Analco. We take a peek the Palafoxian library on one side of the cathedral with is thousands of books from colonial times that is open during daylight as it has no electric lights.

      A bit later as we turn to the street leading to the candy shops we pass by the Santo Domingo Temple and the Rosario Chapel, their interior lined with impressive Baroque altars and a  onyx pulpit; and the Capilla del Rosario, one of the most elaborately decorated Baroque chapels in Mexico, completely covered with ornate sculptured walls and vault in gold leaf and plaster. From passing all the temptations of candy we do surrender to some magnificent local chocolates as we arrive at the Teatro Principal, dating 1760 and seating some 1600, still in use today with an offering of great plays. The theater borders the Artists Quarter and there is a colonial patio where we arrive to see a play that depicts life in Puebla 26 years after being founded over 400 years ago (Puebla is a planned city). The visual staging was admirable as with a cast of dozens the play recreated a market scene that carried us in time with great delight. At the end we had time to catch the end of the concert at the zócalo still full of life as the clock showed it was past 10 pm.  Time to say goodnight and reflect on the magic of a Sunday in Puebla were time seems to go so slow that we could do all of this on foot and never feel the rush of time.

      Monday and Tuesday do change our pace as there meetings to attend in various parts of the city and now we need to get into the car and meet the challenge of urban traffic. Our meetings take us from traditional downtown to modern Puebla in Angelopolis with its eight lane roads, buildings showing the accomplished designs of Mexican architects that mix creativity with earthquake proof structures, university campuses (we have a presentation at the BUAP on Tuesday), golf courses, hotels, hospitals and housing developments.  The afternoon takes us to the Battle Park to see the May Fair were we find hundreds of stands with dozens of variations of popular food, crafts and games. Of great interest is the Mexican Army exhibit showing a modern and professional force, well trained, well equipped and highly disciplined. To my personal pleasure the exhibit included two type aircraft I flew in my Army days.  We had a chance to navigate at the intense building pace in completing the segregation of the Battle Park from the urban area that surrounds it. Our stop there was the ceremony re inaugurating the Planetarium, showing the renewed Imax and Sky projectors all done with and by Puebla technicians. As the Planetarium is located within the Park, it is also planned to be part of the visitors orientation and will show videos of the Battle that will help the visitor visualize what happened there 150 years ago. We close the day by having dinner at one of the two dozen open air restaurants found in the porticos around the Zócalo. Tuesday we return to Angelopolis to make a presentation sponsored by the Center of Innovation and Business Competivity of the BUAP were we presented a concept for the market of historic memorabilia as a foundation for the tourism business and a growth perspective for export of 5 de Mayo crafts and memorabilia.  Mixing business with pleasure, we had lunch at the Murales de Puebla restaurant, a new place for me. There we find ourselves surrounded by fascinating murals –there is a new one to be installed shortly full of 5 de Mayo and period history- we had the pleasure to see one of the greatest selections of mescal (tequila is a form of mescal) and taste two recommended by the owner. More important is the variety of choices in their menu full of traditional and innovative dishes. I settled for one of their signature dishes –enchiladas of three moles- will go back for more. For dessert we had one of the best flans I have ever tasted.  One of our last stops was the studio of world famous painter Washington Iza who is doing a specially commissioned work that depicts the Battle of Puebla juxtaposing the Lincoln-Juarez relationship, so important to the successful outcome of both wars.  The day finds its end by sharing literary and history opinions, and some good tequila with a friend.  Back to the hotel and ready to depart in the morning.

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    • 2 years ago
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  • Seattle Seattle

    • From: hoosierfan1997
    • Description:

      Set between two major mountain ranges, the Olympics and the Cascades, with the Puget Sound's fjord-like waters to the west and massive Lake Washington to the east, Seattle has one of the most dramatic settings of any city in the country.

      The frequent moody cloud cover can hide those jagged mountains but on clear days 14,411-foot (4297 meter) Mount Rainier can be seen from the city. Reuters correspondents with local knowledge help visitors get the most out of a short stay in the northwestern U.S. city.


      Friday
      6 p.m. - If the clouds have lifted even a bit, there's no better place to watch the sunset over Elliott Bay than from the Seattle Art Museum's nine-acre Olympic Sculpture Park on the downtown waterfront. Besides wandering about the 20 sculptures from major artists like Alexander Calder, Louise Nevelson and Richard Serra, you can enjoy further views of the changeable bay by strolling along the paved trail through nearby Myrtle Edwards Park.


      7 p.m. - Head up to the Capitol Hill neighborhood and start the weekend with cocktails at Tavern Law, named by GQ Magazine as one of the 25 best bars in America.


      There are plenty of handcrafted cocktails to enjoy in the Prohibition-era surroundings, but celebrate the start of your getaway with a custom champagne cocktail. Peruse the menu. The oxtail banh mi sandwich, based on Vietnamese tradition, will give you a taste of the Pacific Rim influence that figures in so many Seattle menus.


      9 p.m. - Seattle takes its jazz seriously and there's no better spot than Dimitriou's Jazz Alley downtown to hear it. With any luck, a musician like Grammy Award-winning Arturo Sandoval will be holding court. Or maybe you'll catch the funky horn-driven Tower of Power.


      Saturday
      9 a.m. - Fortify yourself for the day ahead with one of the best Mexican breakfasts anywhere at Senor Moose in the lively Ballard neighborhood. The crowded restaurant offers breakfast specialties culled from regions throughout Mexico. Try the outstanding huevos motuleos with black beans inspired by the Yucatan breakfast staple. Even though it's early, go ahead and get an order of the flawless guacamole and chips. It's surprisingly good with a cup of Senor Moose's strong coffee.

      11 a.m. - Get a sense of Ballard's historic status as Seattle's Scandinavian neighborhood at the Nordic Heritage Museum and at stops such as the shop Scandinavian Specialties, where you can pick up house-made cured meats, homemade Swedish meatballs and a bowl of traditional yellow split pea soup.


      Ballard also has a lively shopping scene.  KAVU, a local Seattle clothing and gear company, offers the quintessential Northwest look, with hip interpretations of outdoorsy style clothes. Stop at The Secret Garden Bookshop which has a carefully chosen selection of books for children and adults. For lunch, head to the nearby Ray's Boathouse Cafe with views for which Seattle is famous, along with the seafood.


      3 p.m. - Spend the next two hours absorbing more of Asia's influence on Seattle at the Seattle Asian Art Museum. The museum, which is situated in lovely Volunteer Park, showcases exquisite art from various centuries and numerous counties in Asia.

      5 p.m. - Continue your exploration of Seattle's hot cocktail scene at the Zig Zag Cafe tucked away behind the Pike Place Market. Try the One Legged Duck, a blend of Rye Whiskey, Dubonnet, Mandarine Napoleon and Fernet Branca. Order a plate of marinated olives to go with it, or try the cheese plate. Much of the food on the menu is sourced at the Pike Place Market.

      7 p.m. - Since you're already at Pike Place, head to Matt's in the Market on the third floor of the Corner Market Building, where the food matches the view. Meat lovers can try the Pork Belly Confit with kimchi broth. For those who prefer seafood try the clams with chorizo and cava or order anything with Dungeness crab or perhaps some oysters on the half shell. For a larger plate try the seafood stew.


      9 p.m. - For a great evening head to the Triple Door in the heart of downtown Seattle, which offers music ranging from pop chanteuse crooners to Apple Jam, a group presenting a critically praised tribute to the Beatles.  A great wine list is available, along with excellent cocktails and Southeast Asian inspired plates. The satays are a perennial favorite.

       


      Sunday

      10 a.m. - For brunch try Salty's at Alki in West Seattle. It can be crowded, but the views and lavish assortment of Northwest foods on offer more than make up for it, including piles of Dungeness crab and smoked salmon, along with brunch staples like Eggs Benedict and Belgian waffles. Afterwards walk for miles along the waterfront through Alki, Seattle's premiere people watching neighborhood and beach scene. Seals often pop their heads up here, and you'll see ferries chugging off to local islands.

      1 p.m. - Seattle is a book lover's town, and readers have many fine bookstores to visit. Seattle Mystery Bookshop in historic Pioneer Square is one of the best and offers both new and used books. Passionate, friendly staff can help you find the perfect read.

      For an excellent general selection, Elliott Bay Book Company on Capitol Hill has the goods, many with staff recommendations, plus a great selection of unique cards. It's easy to lose yourself in the stacks, so keep an eye on the clock if you need catch a flight.

       

       

      MORE…

      With booming family-friendly popularity, Seattle is an urban playground with wide open appeal for outdoor lovers. If you enjoy tall emerald forests and city parks, stunning views of distant snow-capped mountains and miles of Puget-Sound open water, you'll love Seattle. While many know Seattle as the rain capital, Seattleites boast their city actually gets less annual rain than New York or Miami. A little drizzle is no reason to miss out on exploring -- especially in summer.

       

      Most city attractions for kids are clustered at Seattle Center, a 74-acre downtown venue with the Space Needle, Children's Museum, Children's Theatre, Pacific Science Center, Experience Music Project and an indoor-outdoor amusement park. Large event fests are here; make sure to bring strollers for the little ones.

      ·         Pike Place Market. The nine-acre Market, which opened on August 17, 1907 according to its website (http://www.pikeplacemarket.com) is can't- miss for all ages as the city's heart and soul. The Market is a free National Historic District with more than 250 businesses, 100 farmers, 200 arts and craftspeople and open daily. Arrive at 10 a.m. to beat crowds. Mondays and Tuesdays are best for crafts; Wednesday-Sundays showcase amazing fresh produce. Kids love their photo with Rachel, the iconic life-sized bronze piggy. She's under the central Market clock by Pike Place Fish, where singing fishmongers throw fish.

      ·         Space Needle. This symbol of the 1962 World's Fair has an observation tower ("O Deck") at 520 feet high. Kids love scoping out Mount Rainier on free telescopes. SkyQ's interactive experience, with five touch-screen kiosks, entertains all. An often-crowded gift shop sells noteworthy souvenirs. Kids 3 and under free; kids ages 4-13 pay $9, ages 14-64 pay $16 and people over 65 years old pay $14.

      ·         Seattle Aquarium. While gazing into a 120,000-gallon aquarium, kids of all ages are astonished as they also see colorful salmon, rockfish, sea anemones and native Washington marine life. Also, there's storytelling for the youngest. On the waterfront at Pier 59, down a flight of stairs from Pike Place Market. It gets crowded, so arrive at 9:30 a.m. Kids ages 3 and under are admitted for free. Admission for youth (ages 4-12) is $10.50, and admission for adults is $16.

      ·         Pacific Science Center. This hands-on, six-acre facility is great for elementary-aged kids, with interactive exhibits and live science demonstrations. A tropical butterfly area is popular for all ages. Also, IMax movies, laser tag and the Planetarium offer an educational, yet fun way of showing kids information. Prices range from $17-$23 for adults and $10-$13 for kids.

      ·         Woodland Park Zoo. Its naturalistic settings rank the 92-acre Woodland Park among the country's top zoos with appeal to all animal lovers. Chilean flamingos, an African savanna, tropical rain forest, and covered activities such as parakeets feeding provide a full day's entertainment. Bring dollar bills for rides on an old-fashioned carousel (merry-go-round). Admission depends on the time of year. Kids under age 2 are admitted for free; admission for adults (October-April) is $11 and $16.50 during summer months. Admission for kids ages 3 through 12 is $11 during summer months and $8 the rest of the year. Be sure to rent a wagon (near admission entrance).

      ·         Experience Music Project Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame. One of the world's largest collections of memorabilia from Seattle icon Jimi Hendrix. EMPSFM appeals to rockers, high school teens and parents who remember Hendrix. It celebrates American popular music genres. Also, a SpinKids Station amuses young kids. Kids ages 4 and under are admitted for free. Admission for youth (ages 5-17) is $12, and admission for adults is $15.

      ·         Tillicum Village & Tours. For a memorable four-hour evening, take a late afternoon cruise to scenic Blake Island State Park, birthplace of Chief Seattle, for a Northwest Coast Native American dance presentation. An all-you-can-eat traditional salmon bake dinner is yummy. Board from downtown waterfront's Pier 55. Kids under 4, free; kids aged 5-12 pay $30 and adults pay $79.95.

      ·         Bainbridge Island. Board a downtown Seattle walk-on ferry (about $7 roundtrip, no reservations) at downtown's Pier 52 for a 35-minute ride to charming 28-square-mile Bainbridge Island. It's a fun day trip for the family. Enjoy ice cream, coffees, lunch or picnic. Bring a stroller.

      ·         Olympic Sculpture Park. This free, downtown nine-acre sculpture park is a great spot to view Puget Sound and Olympic Mountains scenery. A z-shaped path rambles among permanent and rotating sculptures. Great for a picnic lunch with treats picked up from shops at nearby Pike Place Market.

      ·         Alki Beach Park. Kids love this true sandy free beach park, with a 2.5-mile pedestrian walkway. It's where the first white settlers arrived in Seattle in 1851. Catch a Metro Bus (Route 56) a block from Pike Place Market. Water temps average 46 to 56 degrees Fahrenheit.

      ·         University District Farmers market. Washington's largest "farmer's only" market is also Seattle's oldest market, taking place every Saturday throughout the year. Sample local farm foods and watch chef demonstrations. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. near University of Washington.

      ·         Hiram M. Chittenden Locks. Kids love watching salmon climb up a fish ladder or catching a glimpse of a sea lion from a viewing window. Also known as the Ballard Locks, the locks raise and lower boats between fresh and salt water.

      ·         Downtown parking is expensive and is challenging to find. Keep it simple -- walk, ride Metro Buses or take a cab.

      ·         One-way streets and steady construction can cause direction confusion; ask for directions.

      ·         The city's scenic waterfront-area hills are steep. Pack each family member's most comfortable shoes.

      ·         At dusk, avoid historic Pioneer Square and Pike Place Market areas (hangouts for rowdy, alcohol-slugging vagrants).

      ·         During late spring and summer, throngs of visitors and cruise passengers frequent popular spots; arrive early in the morning. Arrange a meeting place if family members get separated.

      ·         Summer air conditioning is scarce, so plan accordingly. November kicks off the cool rainy season. In winter, dusk arrives come late afternoon.

       

      Other things things you should know

      ·         Seattle's Visitor Center and Concierge Services have free bookings and reservations for dining, tours, and transportation. Open Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Washington State Convention & Trade Center's Upper Pike Street lobby, 7th and Pike streets. 206-461-5800.

      ·         Most top children's attractions are conveniently located near Seattle Center, a 74-acre urban park, including the Space Needle, the modernistic 1962 World's Fair landmark.

      ·         Seattle's climate is refreshing from July through September. Pack a light jacket or sweater, but most humidity-free temps range from 50s Fahrenheit to the 80s.

      ·         Dressy attire not required. Seattle is casual and laid-back, with layered comfort a fashion standard.\

      ·         Multiple public parks, with green space for running and hiking (some with beaches) offer kid-friendly places for dissipating energy.

      ·         Caught in a downpour? Cool weather? The towering, downtown flagship REI, billed as the world's premier outdoor gear store, has a 65-foot freestanding indoor climbing wall. (Residents typically shun umbrellas).

      ·         At Pike Place Information Booth, corner of Pike Street and 1st Avenue, buy half-priced concert and play tickets for day of performance.

      ·         While walking downtown, have kids look for Seattle's iconic bronze pigs. Take pictures.

      ·         During the winter, rent a car for the day and take the kids skiing. Crystal Mountain has the state's highest vertical drop, along with scenic chairlift rides, hiking trails and biking trails (www.skicrystal.com). Also, the Summit at Snoqualmie has easy accessibility and lessons, both skiing and snowboarding, for adults and kids (www.summitatsnoqualmie.com).

      ·         Plan picnics after visits to the Pike Place Market area. Fresh fruits, cheese, meats and sweet treat food choices are abundant. Don't miss Beecher's for cheese near the market; kids love the homemade mac and cheese on a cool day.

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  • Denversjar

    • Points:502
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  • Port Townsend Courthouse from Port Townsend Courthouse from Boat Haven

    • From: karengale
    • Description:

      The Jefferson County Courthouse, located on the hill above Boat Haven on Admiralty Inlet, is of Romanesque style architecture.  It was built in the early 1890s, complete with a clock and bell tower, which was recently repaired and chimes the hours.  Depending on the direction of the wind one can hear the bells as far away as the Fairgrounds.  Here is a summer scene depicting the pleasures of low tide, taken from the Larry Scott Trail, which will soon connect Port Townsend to Neah Bay for walkers, bicyclists, etc.

    • 2 years ago
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  • What Everybody Ought to Know a What Everybody Ought to Know about Connecticut

    • From: plonde
    • Description:

      It’s not a big state–no news there.

      It has the highest per capita income and median household income in the U.S. Maybe only a few folks on your trivia team know that, but it’s not something EVERYBODY should know.

      By my standards what they ought to know is that for a small state seen as a bedroom community, Connecticut has some impressive destinations to make it worthy of a day trip while exploring New England. More than a day? Then you likely know someone there.

      • Mystic Seaport – Ahh, spectacular ships under restoration, enormous trees on site for the task, an anchor taller than my townhouse. Tug boats, why sailors have tattoos, why ships have figures of people on them. An old time port experience with doctor, post office and such. Hours, the whole day, two days? All depends on your particular interests.
      • The Clock and Watch Museum – Thankfully all in synch or I couldn’t have stayed even in this extremely cool and lovely  place. Pocket watches and cuckoo clocks, Grandfather clocks and time pieces for railroads. Beautiful and functional.
      • Mystic Pizza – of the movie fame. Not worth the stop. Sorry.

      What did you explore in Connecticut?
      What should be on my/someone’s itinerary for a return visit?

      www.AmericanaTheBeautiful.org

      @AmericanaBtiful

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
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  • Why a Stationery Museum is Soo Why a Stationery Museum is Sooo much more Interesting than You’d Expect

    • From: plonde
    • Description:

      Crane Stationery has been making the paper for US currency since the Revolutionary War. Yup, write a thank you note, make some ACTUAL cash–all goes together in a perfect business model, doesn’t it?

      There’s Nothing to See Here
      The Museum of Papermaking is in the Berkshires, housed on the property where paper for money really is being made. An innocuous site until you notice the security. And unmarked semi trucks. And fences. And oddly they point all of this out to you on the tour… diversion tactics or an eager tour guide? Either way, makes a good story.

      The First Gig
      In 1879 the US government selected Crane  as the sole producer of banknote paper for the first national currency. And they’ve been the producer ever since.

      Working Hard for the Money
      There’s no job security, though. Only within the last few years has the government become prudent enough to award the contract for more than a year at a time. Now it’s a four-year stint. Can you imagine the paperwork for an annual proposal? No pun intended. I’m sure it was a security thing, but come on, that’s serious inefficiency.

      No Such Thing as Easy Money
      The currency paper and anti-counterfitting measures are both made at Crane, with different security tactics for each denomination. The actual printing happens at the Treasury. The watermark process is so secretive that it’s imprinted on the plant floor behind guarded curtains. Crane is so respected for their money-making work that they do it for 15 countries and also print their currency.  

      (Not) Made in the USA
      Ironically, American money is not made using American product. The cotton comes from all over the world except the US of A. Quality and cost, my friends. Yeah for capitalism! And FYI on the cotton, it’s the tiny shreds left in the boll after the initial “extraction”, not the parts used for clothes. Take about using everything but the squeal.

      Well What About the Stationery?
      If it’s got cold edges, it really is gold leaf. That’s applied by hand and takes a year to master the art. And talk about quality control: every sheet of paper is inspected by hand before being cut to size.

      So now we know why their stationery costs a bit more.
      Do you think it’s worth it?
      Do you still use stationery?
      Can you come up with money puns that I didn’t already include in this post?

      Like to be surprised by seemingly mundane museums that turn out to be amazing? Check out this past post about the Clock and Watch Museum.

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Time Waits for No One at the A Time Waits for No One at the American Clock and Watch Museum

    • From: ptlonde
    • Description:

      Time Waits for No One at the American Clock and Watch Museum

      Now, I don’t even wear a watch (haven’t for 15+ years) and yet I was compelled to visit the American Clock and Watch Museum in Bristol, CT.

      Why? It’s fascinating to study a collection of a single item; to watch its progression over time (no pun intended in this case) and to see how pop culture influenced the functional in classic and tacky ways.

      Plus I have a soft spot for pocket watches. How cool was it when a man would twirl it on the chain and plop it into his vest pocket?! (Of course, I’ve only seen that in movies.)

      1,500 clocks and watches comprise this collection. A person could go, umm, cuckoo, if the clocks weren’t all the same time. Fortunately and amazingly they’re synchronized. A feat even Superman doesn’t have on his resume. He leaps tall buildings in a single bound, sure, but can he attune hundreds of clocks? Nope, not that I’ve heard of. You?

      The clocks date back to 1680 and the watches to 1595. Shazzam.

      The majority of the collection is from pieces made in Connecticut, which was a renowned clock manufacturing area of the 19th century. A clock-maker apprenticed for seven years. About the same as medical school….

      In the early days of the railroad, clocks had both local time and RR time. Local time was based on when the sun was overhead at noon. This varied with each town as the train traveled East to West, so there needed to be a consistent RR time to know the train schedule. Clocks with both times lasted about 10 years, and in November 1883 time zones were created using railroad time as the standard.

      Do you have a collection of 1,500 anything?
      Do you like small museums? What’s been your favorite?
      Can you swing a pocket watch into your vest?

      www.AmericanaTheBeautiful.org

      @AmericanaBtiful

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
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  • Pony Swim Diary Pony Swim Diary

    • From: karthur22
    • Description:

      Pony  Swim"So let me get this straight. They swim a bunch of horses across the water to Chickopeake?"

      "Yes, it's quite lovely. And they're ponies and it's called "Chincoteague! CHINCOTEAGUE!!"

      Although my memory of the original conversation is hazy, that's kind of how my wife Rachel first introduced me to the place she and her mother went to religiously every last week in July and where they dragged me along back in 2002.

      Flash forward to 2011 and I've come back for Pony Penning Week every year since. Like Rachel and her mom, I fell in love with Chincoteague, its people and its famous herd of ponies. What makes each Pony Swim extra special is the fact that we have a standing reservation with Captain Barry Frishman, who always manages to get us front-row seats. This past summer was no exception and it was, as usual, a day to remember.

      4 a.m., July 27, 2011: The alarm clock rings and it's pitch black outside. Rachel, why are we getting up so early on our vacation? As I clear the cobwebs from my head I remember that today is the 86th annual Chincoteague Pony Swim and it's time to haul ourselves over to the boat.

      4:30 a.m.: Stumbling out of our car in the parking lot in front of the Chincoteague Inn I notice that at this early hour it's so quiet that even the ducks must still be asleep. We head over to the dock where our host for the day and Chincoteague waterman extraordinaire, Captain Barry, is already aboard his pontoon boat, his headlamp cutting through the darkness as he makes final preparations. It's time to get going if we want to get a good spot for the swim.

      Rachel hops on board first, then her mother, Darby, followed closely by our 8-year-old niece, Penelope, and finally our good friends and fellow Pony Swim aficionados, Linda and Jeff Wild. With the exception of Penelope, who's seeing the event up close for the first time, we're all Pony Penning veterans (or some would say crazies). It's Darby's 16th year, Rachel's 15th, Jeff and Linda's 10th and my 8th.

      5 a.m.: We set off into the darkness. Ahh, there's nothing like the smell of the water at this time of morning. The Pony Swim gods have favored us this year with a completely clear sky from which peeks a crescent moon. Not so in previous years, when our pre-dawn excursion was met with a zero visibility fog or a pounding rain worthy of "The Deadliest Catch."

      And there, off in the distance over on Assateague is the Chincoteague Lighthouse, like an old friend keeping us company with its steady flashes. Hold on, we're not alone out here on the water. There are a few other boats making their way to the swim.

      5:30 a.m.: We have finally arrived at the channel between Chincoteague and Assateague, where the ponies will make their crossing, and there are already a lot of other boats on scene. I thought we left early, but have these people slept here all night? Oh well, there's still plenty of room for us and we set anchor a few boats over from the end of the marsh.

      By the way, marsh plus early morning on Chincoteague equals a skeeter red alert so it's time to bring out the bug spray.

      One of the great aspects of the event is the fact that there's a great camaraderie amongst all the boat captains; all the vessels on our side of the channel tie up to each other so that if you wanted to, you could almost literally walk from boat to boat from one bank of the waterway to the other.

      I haven't yet mentioned that over the past couple of days, word has been circulating on the island that this year's swim is slated to occur between 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. when the tide is slack so the ponies won't have to fight the current. Okay, we got here and now we've only got about seven hours to kill. Seven hours! Anyone have a copy of "War and Peace"?

      7 a.m.: We see a tailfin in the water, then another. Cue the theme from "Jaws." Oops, those aren't great white sharks. They're dolphins. As they dive and surface right in front of our assembled armada they seem to be saying to each other, "What the heck are all these boats doing anchored here and what are they waiting for? Ponies swimming? It's time to catch some fish somewhere else."

      7:15 a.m.: I hear a sizzling from the back of the boat which I hope isn't the sound of the engine on fire. Not to worry. It's only Captain Barry, who's gotten his hotplate going to make us all egg sandwiches. Compared to Barry, Captain Merrill Stubing from "Love Boat" seems like a lowly deck hand. The entire Pony Swim experience wouldn't be the same without Barry, one of the most dynamic people I've ever known, whose joy about the natural beauty and wildlife of Chincoteague leaves a smile with all who have the pleasure of being aboard his boat.

      8 a.m.: The waiting continues. Still over four hours to go. By now a large crowd has already gathered on the other side of the channel at the end of Pony Swim Lane where the ponies come ashore.

      10 a.m.: Okay folks, no monkey business now because a couple of Coast Guard vessels have arrived. They're here to maintain order and safety amongst the assembled Pony Swim viewers but also they eventually get to shoot off a big red flare, not for fun, of course -- although I'm sure there's competition between Coast Guard officers for that honor, since how often can you shoot off a big flare? -- but to formally declare that the tide is slack and alert the famous Saltwater Cowboys that it's time to herd the ponies down the marsh and into the channel.

      10:15 a.m.: One of the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Company's boats makes an inspection of the channel and I wave to my good friend and CVFC member Roe Terry, who also happens to be one of the island's most talented decoy carvers.

      10:30 a.m.: There are two guys on horseback on the bank in front of Pony Swim Lane. Our first cowboys have arrived. It can't be long now, we think. We're wrong.

      11:10 a.m.: The Saltwater Cowboys' signature red and white horse barge, on which the cowboys will transport their horses once the ponies have made their crossing, makes its way to the Assateague side of the channel. I could never get my horse even near a barge like that, so it's amazing that they're able to load their horses so easily when the time comes.barge

      11:25 a.m.: What do you get when you combine orange juice and champagne? If you said 'mimosas,' you're correct. But not ordinary mimosas, because on Pony Swim day they're made by Captain Barry, who -- and I'm not making this up -- actually hand squeezes the oranges with a juicer he keeps on board.

      11:52 a.m.: We must be getting closer to showtime because three advance riders arrive on the Assateague shoreline and their horses are loaded onto the barge and taken across to Chincoteague.

      1:10 p.m.: Can you see if they've got the flare gun? I think so ... no, false alarm. Wait a minute, I think I see it -- yes, there it goes! After much anticipation the Coast Guard finally lights the red flare. By now there are thousands of people ringing the shoreline on foot and in boats and a great cheer erupts from the crowd. The waiting is over.Pony Swim flare

      1:20 p.m.: At first you hear what might be a distant rumble of thunder on the wind, but then the sound become more distinct -- men shouting and horses whinnying that gets louder and louder. Finally you see what we've all been waiting for since 5:30 a.m. -- the Saltwater Cowboys on their trusty horses leading the wild ponies of Chincoteague, stallions heading up the herd as mares and their foals follow behind, paints, chestnuts, palominos, bays and buckskins all on the march. There's no time for dillydallying with only a small window of time for slack tide and so the cowboys urge the herd forward. The lead ponies -- is that Surfer Dude I see up front? -- hit the water first and initially it's shallow enough that they can walk into the channel. But soon enough the water deepens and they start swimming.

      "You want me to go across there?" the foals seem to say to their mothers, but eventually they're coaxed forward, too, amidst the constant whooping of the cowboys, and the entire herd is doing the doggie paddle. What a sight -- and best of all this entire scene has unfolded right in front of our boat.

      Four minutes later, it's all over when the last pony makes it ashore on Chincoteague.Pony Swim shore

      1:30 p.m.: Captain Barry raises anchor and fires up the engine to get out of there as quickly as possible to avoid the ensuing maritime rush hour of other boats trying to do the same. The fun's not over yet and thanks to the generosity of Daisey's Dockside, Barry is able to let us off there temporarily so we can watch the cowboys lead the horses down Main Street to the carnival grounds. I

      2:25 p.m.: We join the crowds that have gathered on both sides of Main Street. Right now I'm hearing Tom Petty singing "the waiting is the hardest part," which is what this day seems to be all about. Fortunately, as the sweat from the afternoon heat drips down our faces, we soon see the flashing lights of the law enforcement vehicles clearing the way and the Saltwater Cowboys make a repeat entrance, with the ponies this time, a few feet in the street in front us. Just like the swim, the parade goes like clockwork and it's time to get back to the boat for the final leg of our journey.

      2:45 p.m.: We arrive back at the dock at the Chincoteague Inn. Have we really been on the boat for more than 10 hours? Everyone's exhausted but, as they say, it's a good kind of tired, having had the privilege of yet again being so close to such a great spectacle.

      Captain Barry's BoatWho in their right mind would want to do this again --getting up before the crack of dawn, waiting for hours on a boat in the middle of the channel in all weather conditions? WE would! As we head back to our cars we all agree with Barry -- same time next year.

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
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  • Time Waits for No One at the A Time Waits for No One at the American Clock and Watch Museum

    • From: plonde
    • Description:

      Clock and Watch Museum

      Disclaimer: this is a terrible scan of a low resolution photo, that was printed at a small size.

      Now, I don’t even wear a watch (haven’t for 15+ years) and yet I was compelled to visit the American Clock and Watch Museum in Bristol, CT.

      Why? It’s fascinating to study a collection of a single item; to watch its progression over time (no pun intended in this case) and to see how pop culture influenced the functional in classic and tacky ways.

      Plus I have a soft spot for pocket watches. How cool was it when a man would twirl it on the chain and plop it into his vest pocket?! (Of course, I’ve only seen that in movies.)

      1,500 clocks and watches comprise this collection. A person could go, umm, cuckoo, if the clocks weren’t all the same time. Fortunately and amazingly they’re synchronized. A feat even Superman doesn’t have on his resume. He leaps tall buildings in a single bound, sure, but can he attune hundreds of clocks? Nope, not that I’ve heard of. You?

      The clocks date back to 1680 and the watches to 1595. Shazzam.

      The majority of the collection is from pieces made in Connecticut, which was a renowned clock manufacturing area of the 19th century. A clock-maker apprenticed for seven years. About the same as medical school….

      In the early days of the railroad, clocks had both local time and RR time. Local time was based on when the sun was overhead at noon. This varied with each town as the train traveled East to West, so there needed to be a consistent RR time to know the train schedule. Clocks with both times lasted about 10 years, and in November 1883 time zones were created using railroad time as the standard.

      Do you have a collection of 1,500 anything?
      Do you like small museums? What’s been your favorite?
      Can you swing a pocket watch into your vest?

      www.AmericanaTheBeautiful.org

      @AmericanaBtiful

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 367
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