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99 Search Results for "directions"

  • Why Car Rental Is A Comfortabl Why Car Rental Is A Comfortable Mode Of Transportation?

    • From: rahulsharma
    • Description:

      The daily hustle bustle, the logjam of the roads and traffic commotion are an intimate part of everyone’s life in a metropolitan city such as Delhi. But despite all the traffic snarls and mad rush, the city of Delhi remains a dream destination for the locals as well as the foreigners. And like any other major city, travel lies at the heart of it which keeps the city’s heart beating and alive. But if you are planning to explore the city or have to commute on a regular basis, you can opt for smart way of travelling through the means of Car Rental in Delhi. You can save yourself from all the traffic hassles and just relax & enjoy the mesmerizing city.

      Let’s delve deeper into what makes this mode of transportation more preferable compared to public & private ones. Public transports though economical are not at all comfortable and leave you completely exhausted. People in major cities like Delhi don’t mind shelling out some extra money in order to make their travelling more comfortable. If you opt for private transportation, though it might ease out the travelling but it also will surely burn a hole in the pocket. Apart from bearing the cost of the vehicle you will also have to pay for the fuel prices and the maintenance of the vehicle. Car rental is a service that combines the best of both the worlds by providing the comfort of a private transportation at an affordable costing.

      These companies offer a wide range of travelling options which are also readily available. From budget cars to luxury cars, there is something for everyone. The chauffeurs provided are well versed with the knowledge about the city they are driving in and also professionally trained. They also fill in for the role of a guide and a friend for those who not familiar with the city especially foreign tourists.

      Inexpensive, convenient and appealing, car rental offers numerous benefits over public and private transportation. Visit popular destination spots or the least visited sections of the city without worrying about the directions or burning a hole in the pocket. Many reputed Rental companies in Delhi have come up which are providing their services on a national level. The travel industry has witnessed a significant growth in such car hire agencies which still continues to grow.

      If you are wondering for the reliability of such car rental agencies then fret no more. The companies ensure that their vehicles are in good running condition and also provide with immediate replacement in case of a breakdown. Most of the cars are also fully equipped with destination guides, GPS technology & handy route maps.

    • Blog post
    • 5 months ago
    • Views: 375
  • Advice on trekking to Everest Advice on trekking to Everest Base Camp

    • From: tibettravel
    • Description:

      When you get to the Everest Base Camp at the foot of the world’s highest peak on foot step by step, you must feel extremely proud of yourself. That is why the Tibet trek tour from Tingri to Everest Base Camp becomes one of the classic trekking in Tibet. Here is some advice on trekking to Everest Base Camp.

      1. Take your time.

      Remember, you are doing a trek at an altitude over 4,000m, you are not doing a race and nobody is judging how quickly you get up the hill. Acclimatize properly, drink plenty of water and if you need to take an extra rest day. Nobody is going to ask you how long it takes you to get to Everest Base Camp; they are just going to be amazed when you made it. Your guide and porter will not mind if you hire them for an extra day or two. They will be glad for the work. 

      2. Bring a book.

      Trekking from Tingri to Everest Base Camp takes several days and it can get a little boring at times. You may only have the energy to lie in bed and read a book, so bring a good one. You can buy books in Lhasa, capital of Tibet.

      3. Bring a water purifier or purification tablets

      Do not drink the water found in the rivers and lakes in Tibet when you are making a Tibet tour. The safety of drinking water in Tibet has been bothering rural Tibetans in Tibet's remote farming and pastoral areas. Drinking water in Tibet should be purified with iodine or other purification tablets to prevent intestinal complaints.

      4. Buy your gear in Lhasa

      You can buy all trekking gears in Lhasa, trekking poles, hats, gloves, socks, down jackets, sleeping bags etc. Everything you could possibly need to trek to Everest Base Camp is available in Tibet. If you need it or forgot it, you can get it.

      5. Bring chocolate and any treats that you want

      It is easily to lose energy when trekking on the high plateau. So it is best to bring some chocolates or any treats you want. Sometimes when the altitude gets to us, the only thing that feels good going down is chocolate. It is a good idea to have some with you and you can buy it in Lhasa.

      6. Give Yak and its owner the right of way at all times.

      You may hire yak to carry luggage for you or meet yaks and Sherpas during your trek. When a yak train comes, move to the mountain side to get out of the way. You don’t want to be nudged off a cliff by a yak. Sherpa’s and porters work hard on Everest, they are constantly taking supplies up and down the mountain. Help make their life easier by staying out of their way.

      7. Have a good first aid kit. 

      Altitude sickness is the biggest risk for travelers who travel to Tibet. Diamox is a must for altitude symptoms. Follow the directions and take 1/2 of a 500 mg tablet twice a day. Make sure to have decongestants, Advil or your choice of pain reliever, lip balm and sunscreen is a must. I had a woman give me salve for my sinuses to moisten them. My nasal cavities dried out and I suffered from severe nose bleeds which were quite scary. I will always have a lubricant for my nose from now on.

      8. Keep batteries close to your body at all times.

      Sleep with them in your sleeping bags. It is difficult to find a place to charge batteries. The cold temperature drains batteries quickly, so you need to extend their life by keeping them warm.

       

    • Blog post
    • 10 months ago
    • Views: 93
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  • Directions Directions

    • From: Vonelle Viajera
    • Description:

      in Oregon

    • 1 year ago
    • Views: 589
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  • The Magnificent Faces of Bayon The Magnificent Faces of Bayon, Cambodia

    • From: msmarls
    • Description:

      Angkor Wat Archeological Park is one of the true wonders of the world, and among the many jaw dropping sites are the incredible faces of the temple named Bayon. They tower over you as you explore the temple, facing in all directions with a gentle yet ever watchful smile. Among the true treasures of the world.

    • 1 year ago
    • Views: 728
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  • Squatting, but not on a stool Squatting, but not on a stool

    • From: sbogen
    • Description:

      This sign at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai gave directions to the stool, but the signmakers clearly had in mind an alternate meaning of the word "stool" that would require any squatting to be done on two legs rather than three.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 912
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  • In Touch with the Real World: In Touch with the Real World: Vietnam Bicycle Tour

    • From: Activetravel
    • Description:

      Because the technology makes traveling easier than it was hundreds years ago, today people fly from places to places to experience the different cultures in various countries. Vietnam, however, is one place that people think it is the place left in the world that is so close to the “reality.” Many destinations have not yet been explored by travelers.

      Vietnam is a bicycle-friendly country. Many people use bikes to commute in Vietnam. Bicycle travelers, Bill Fridl, Patrick Morris and David Foster chose their ways to discover the country. They cycled in Vietnam between 1995 and 2000. If you choose this method to sightsee in Vietnam, time can be the issue. Plan a trip with time flexibility to ensure a good quality trip. Cycling in Vietnam, time and energy are what you need. Knowing basic techniques to take care your bike would be a plus, and you can usually find some locals to help you with the bicycle problems. However, the language barrier could be a challenge.

      The bicycle brings more adventure excitments

      People who had traveled to Vietnam agreed that it was an interesting experience in general, but the bicycle tours definitely brought more adventurous excitements. There are two directions you can go. From north to south, you can visit Hanoi, Hue, Danang and Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City) in that order. Or choose the other way travel from south to north. You can fly to Saigon and bike to Danang, Hue and Hanoi. I figure that if I am biking from place to place, I don’t want to go back and forth. Additionally, I want to at least visit and spend some time at the four big cities in Vietnam.

      According to some experienced bicycling travelers, it will take about three weeks to finish the route, but it really depends on how much time you want to spend in these places as a tourist, meaning sightseeing and just hanging out to relax. The benefit and disadvantage of the bike tour is that you might feel the cultural shocks sooner than regular “tourists” because you are so close to the locals.

      Be prepared for the cultural clashes

      Beginning from national capital Hanoi, a city called the “Paris of the Orient” because of the beautiful lakes and shaded streets. The beauty of the bike tour is that you can meet the locals and observe what they are doing every day. Friendly smiles, sunshine beaches and yummy food, they are all the amazing things to attract biker’s attention on the way to their next destination. While hanging out nearHanoi, Frenchtown, Ho Chi Minh Museum, Presidential Palace, Hoan Kiem Lake, Ngoc Son Temple are hot spots to visit. Hanoi is a historical town where visitors can find evidence of the history.

      Hearing so many people’s stories about visiting Hanoi, Bat Trang sounds like an attractive place. The town specializes in making large pottery and porcelain using traditional methods. The history dates back since the 16th century. This destination might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I am usually attracted by the things like that. Besides, Bat Trang is located in the southeast of Hanoi about 17 kilometers away.

      Hue, known as one of the most beautiful cities in Vietnam, is the royal family’s former residence. Hue is also the heart of culture, religion and education. After days of biking, visiting the Thien Mu Pagoda is a peaceful journey. When you feel like a little bit of sunshine and salty water, the Thuan An Beach connects to the South China Sea and is about 13 kilometers from Hue. The beach has a protected lagoon. Although foreigners need to pay the fee to enter the area, it is still a popular location.

      Along the Perfum River (Huong Giang), there are many places to see such as Hon Chen Temple, Minh Mang Tomb and Gia Long Tomb. They are solemn locations with great masterpieces of architecture. Other things such as people’s activities on the streets and the view at the Trang Tien Bridge can also be appealing to visitors as well.

      Start from Hue and bike 108 kilometers south, you arrive at Danang. It might sound like a long way, but you will enjoy the view of Lang Co Beach and Hai Van Pass. In 1965, Danang became one of the biggest US military bases in Southeast Asia.

      The China Beach (Non Nuoc) is about 15 kilometers from Danang and about one kilometer away from the Marble Mountains. The beach is a popular surfing and swimming resort from March to August. Sponsored by the Vietnamese government and other various organizations, there is a surfing contest held in the area every year. Danang is also the third biggest city in Vietnam.

      Finally, you reach Saigon. The city had been through so many times of name changes. Today, it is known as the Ho Chi Minh City worldwide although not many Vietnamese use it. Saigon is probably the most famous city in Vietnam due to its frequent media exposure.

      In Saigon, I won’t miss the water puppet theater for the world. The show is only 20 to 30 minutes long. It is for the children’s entertainment, but it will please all ages. There are two fixed venues, History Museum and War Crimes Museum. It requires many difficult techniques to make a great water puppets show. There are also fixed venues for water puppet shows in Hanoi. Planning the trip, I would probably include the shows at the two cities and called it a Vietnam Water Puppet Tour.

      Some people think Saigon is a dangerous city because of the aggressive drivers, prostitutes, child beggars and other criminals. Experienced travelers recommend being aware of the bui doi (street kids). Vietnamese called them the dust of life. They sell random goods for a living and sometimes steal from tourists. Foreign bikers also think that it is the most confusing place to ride a bike. There are not many traffic lights in the district. Most of the roads seem to be one-way, but not many people follow the signs so be prepared for the chaotic situation.

      Move slowly and prepare for the chaotic streets

      Today, the Internet is so convenient that there is so much information about traveling. Use the search engine leads you to many travelers’ unique stories.

      Visit the following links to read about cycling in Vietnam: Active Travel Asia

    • Blog post
    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 348
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  • In Touch with the Real World: In Touch with the Real World: Vietnam Bicycle Tour

    • From: Activetravel
    • Description:
      Because the technology makes traveling easier than it was hundreds years ago, today people fly from places to places to experience the different cultures in various countries.Vietnam, however, is one place that people think it is the place left in the world that is so close to the “reality.” Many destinations have not yet been explored by travelers.
      Vietnam is a bicycle-friendly country. Many people use bikes to commute in Vietnam. Bicycle travelers, Bill Fridl, Patrick Morris and David Foster chose their ways to discover the country. They cycled in Vietnam between 1995 and 2000. If you choose this method to sightsee in Vietnam, time can be the issue. Plan a trip with time flexibility to ensure a good quality trip. Cycling in Vietnam, time and energy are what you need. Knowing basic techniques to take care your bike would be a plus, and you can usually find some locals to help you with the bicycle problems. However, the language barrier could be a challenge.
       The bicycle brings more adventure excitments
      People who had traveled to Vietnam agreed that it was an interesting experience in general, but the bicycle tours definitely brought more adventurous excitements. There are two directions you can go. From north to south, you can visit Hanoi, Hue, Danang and Saigon (Ho Chi Minh City) in that order. Or choose the other way travel from south to north. You can fly to Saigon and bike to Danang, Hue and Hanoi. I figure that if I am biking from place to place, I don’t want to go back and forth. Additionally, I want to at least visit and spend some time at the four big cities in Vietnam.
      According to some experienced bicycling travelers, it will take about three weeks to finish the route, but it really depends on how much time you want to spend in these places as a tourist, meaning sightseeing and just hanging out to relax. The benefit and disadvantage of the bike tour is that you might feel the cultural shocks sooner than regular “tourists” because you are so close to the locals. 
       Be prepared for the cultural clashes

      Beginning from national capital Hanoi, a city called the “Paris of the Orient” because of the beautiful lakes and shaded streets. The beauty of the bike tour is that you can meet the locals and observe what they are doing every day. Friendly smiles, sunshine beaches and yummy food, they are all the amazing things to attract biker’s attention on the way to their next destination. While hanging out near Hanoi, Frenchtown, Ho Chi Minh Museum, Presidential Palace, Hoan Kiem Lake,Ngoc Son Temple are hot spots to visit. Hanoi is a historical town where visitors can find evidence of the history.
      Hearing so many people’s stories about visiting Hanoi, Bat Trang sounds like an attractive place. The town specializes in making large pottery and porcelain using traditional methods. The history dates back since the 16th century. This destination might not be everyone’s cup of tea, but I am usually attracted by the things like that. Besides, Bat Trang is located in the southeast of Hanoiabout 17 kilometers away.
      Hue, known as one of the most beautiful cities in Vietnam, is the royal family’s former residence.Hue is also the heart of culture, religion and education. After days of biking, visiting the Thien Mu Pagoda is a peaceful journey. When you feel like a little bit of sunshine and salty water, the Thuan An Beach connects to the South China Sea and is about 13 kilometers from Hue. The beach has a protected lagoon. Although foreigners need to pay the fee to enter the area, it is still a popular location.
      Along the Perfum River (Huong Giang), there are many places to see such as Hon Chen Temple, Minh Mang Tomb and Gia Long Tomb. They are solemn locations with great masterpieces of architecture. Other things such as people’s activities on the streets and the view at the Trang TienBridge can also be appealing to visitors as well.
      Start from Hue and bike 108 kilometers south, you arrive at Danang. It might sound like a long way, but you will enjoy the view of Lang Co Beach and Hai Van Pass. In 1965, Danang became one of the biggest US military bases in Southeast Asia.
       
      The China Beach (Non Nuoc) is about 15 kilometers from Danang and about one kilometer away from the Marble Mountains. The beach is a popular surfing and swimming resort from March to August. Sponsored by the Vietnamese government and other various organizations, there is a surfing contest held in the area every year. Danang is also the third biggest city in Vietnam.
      Finally, you reach Saigon. The city had been through so many times of name changes. Today, it is known as the Ho Chi Minh City worldwide although not many Vietnamese use it. Saigon is probably the most famous city in Vietnam due to its frequent media exposure.
      In Saigon, I won’t miss the water puppet theater for the world. The show is only 20 to 30 minutes long. It is for the children’s entertainment, but it will please all ages. There are two fixed venues,History Museum and War Crimes Museum. It requires many difficult techniques to make a great water puppets show. There are also fixed venues for water puppet shows in Hanoi. Planning the trip, I would probably include the shows at the two cities and called it a Vietnam Water Puppet Tour.
      Some people think Saigon is a dangerous city because of the aggressive drivers, prostitutes, child beggars and other criminals. Experienced travelers recommend being aware of the bui doi (street kids). Vietnamese called them the dust of life. They sell random goods for a living and sometimes steal from tourists. Foreign bikers also think that it is the most confusing place to ride a bike. There are not many traffic lights in the district. Most of the roads seem to be one-way, but not many people follow the signs so be prepared for the chaotic situation.
       Move slowly and prepare for the chaotic streets
      Today, the Internet is so convenient that there is so much information about traveling. Use the search engine leads you to many travelers’ unique stories.
      Visit the following links to read about cycling in Vietnam: Active Travel Asia
    • Blog post
    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 374
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  • INFAMOUS SYMMETRY INFAMOUS SYMMETRY

    • From: Donna Carroll
    • Description:

      Picture taken at the base of the "Eiffle Tower"    Absolutely have to see to believe the beauty of the actual monument in Paris.  Believe it or not you can be 2 blocks away in some areas asking directions to the site.  Looking up not always  a good idea as eye witness to someone walking into a street lamp doing this.  "Ouch"

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 410
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  • Lumina Luxury suites and Mexic Lumina Luxury suites and Mexico City

    • From: dannerd
    • Description:

      The Lumina Luxury Suites Hotel is a modern, 8 month old private enclave in the Polanco section of Mexico City. The hotel is within walking distance (10-15 min walk) of Chapultapec Park - the zoo and many of the major museums are in the park.

      The Lumina is a true oasis in the hustle & bustle of Mexico City. It is for residents only and you get buzzed in - reception is manned 24/7. The hotel & decor is modern with lots of black, white, silver, and pale pastels in the color scheme. On check in you are greeted by Barbara, the hotel manager and shown to your room and given a tour of this wonderful hotel. Check in is quick, pleasant and very efficient. Right now most of the guests are business travelers with a few of us leisure travelers - they would love to start getting more leisure travelers and Barbara was happy that I was going to do a write up of the place.

      There are 12 suites in total - 1 and 2 bedroom. All of the 2 bedroom suites have private courtyards and only 1 of the 1 bedroom suites has a private courtyard. We had a 2 bedroom and I highly recommend the 2 bedroom suite - a true home away from home. Our suite had 1 bedroom with a king bed and the other bedroom had 2 twin beds. There is a living/dining room combination, a full kitchenette, 2 bathrooms and 1 large courtyard and a smaller courtyard. All areas of the suite were tastefully and comfortably furnished and the kitchen came equipped with china and silverware for 4, pots and pans, microwave, coffee and tea maker and a reasonably priced fully stocked mini bar. The bathrooms are large and had robes, slippers, hairdryer and nice toiletry articles - very soft and fluffy towels too! Even q-tips and cotton pads for wiping your face. The living area had a comfy leather couch and the dining area had a table and chairs for 4. Everything you would need for an extended stay. Bose sound system with a removable Ipod that you could take for your walks around the city and what was really neat - when you check in there is mobile concierge service - they give you a mobile phone that is programmed with the Lumina's number that you can take with you on your travels around MC -if you get lost or just tired - hit the number for Lumina and they will immediately send a cab to pick you up - we did not need to use this but it was nice to know that we had this option if we needed it!.
      The courtyard off the living area was truly private with comfortable chairs and a table and we enjoyed sitting out there in the mornings and evenings. The smaller courtyard had 2 chairs and a table if you wanted to eat outside. The courtyard walls are composed of Lumina's signature living garden walls - pretty neat concept - concrete walls entirely planted with flowers. The beds were the most comfortable hotel beds I have ever slept on - soft as silk linens and a very fluffy comforter - I felt like I was sleeping on a cloud all enveloped in my cozy nest - did not want to get out of bed in the morning!!! On check in they ask what time you would like your continental breakfast and what kind of juice, teac, coffee, etc. you would like - it is delivered and they set the table for you and you are ready to eat - good selection of breads, rolls, fruit and excellent service. The hotel also has a small gym, steam and sauna rooms, great spa (we did not have time to use the services but the information they sent me had some very enticing treatments listed) and a real nice rooftop deck.
      The restaurant is for guests and their friends only and since we only had 2 nights we ate in the restaurant both nights and food and service were excellent.
      We arrived around 12 noon and wanted to go to the museum - the concierge got a map and great directions all ready for us and away we went to Chapultapec park - walking throught the park is very pleasant with lots of statues lining the way. We passed the zoo which was huge and wished we had time for a visit. We arrived at the National Museum of Anthropology and it is a must see for any visitor to Mexico City - wonderful exhibits of all the different time periods and indigenous people of Mexico. After about 4 hours in the museum we headed back to Lumina for a wonderful dinner and a comfy nights rest. 2 nights dinner and laundry services ran us about $130US - pretty reasonably priced for a 5 star hotel.
      The next day we used the services of Wayak tours for a trip to Teotihuacan - Wayak has very reasonably priced tours and very informative guides - I would recommend them for your stay in Mexico City - they also have tours in many other places in Mexico and a whole fleet of buses that can take you all over Mexico. Our tour not only included Teotihuacan but the Shrine of the Virgin of Guadalupe and a brief 45 min stop in the main zocalo of MC. All place that any visitor to MC should see. Teotihuacan is awesome and so big!
      I am sorry we only had 2 nights in this wonderful hotel & city - we could have easily spent a week at Lumina! I am not usually a big fan of real modern hotels and decor but it worked well here and you felt at home - we absolutely loved it and would go back again!

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 299
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  • Wildmill in Belgium Wildmill in Belgium

    • From: Donna Carroll
    • Description:

      Photo taken in small town of " MEERKERK" Netherlands.   We had lunch in a local restaurant called Schrobbeler where we met the friendliest people who were very proud of their town and recommended we visit the wildmill. 

      They provided postcards and directions to the towns attractions. 

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 260
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  • SIX WEEKS IN SOUTH AFRICA SIX WEEKS IN SOUTH AFRICA

    • From: Dan Beamer
    • Description:

           My wife and I arrived in Johannesburg on a mild spring afternoon.  Our bed and breakfast was located in Little Linden literally yards from the old Linden farm where Nelson Mandela and the ANC  plotted the demise of the white South African government in the early 1950’s and 60’s.  Being in our mid sixties we were a little hesitant in our plan to drive around South Africa.
        DSC02654 - Copy - Copy_edited-1.JPG Our first full day, we visited the Apartheid Museum which was a fascinating look at the history of Apartheid in South Africa. It is really a tribute to Nelson Mandela. DSC02648 - Copy - Copy.JPG From the museum we had our driver take us  to Soweto where we visited Mandela’s first house and learned that Desmond Tutu was a neighbor of the Mandelas. Two Nobel Peace Prize winners were living a block away from each other.  While in Soweto we walked over to the Hector Peterson Memorial.  This plaza commemorated when the students of Soweto walked out of their classrooms on June 16, 1976 to protest the mandatory teaching of all subjects in Afrikans language,  the language spoken by whites in South Africa. Thirteen year old Hector Peterson was killed at this demonstration which led to a prolonged walk out by black South African students and triggered the fall of Aparteid.

           The following day our South African friends drove to Jo’burg to visit us before we departed for Cape Town.  Our friends are Zulus and live in the province of the Free State, south of Johannesburg. We met them while they were on a Fulbright teacher exchange in the states a couple of years ago. We enjoyed a traditional Braai (barbeque),  with sausages, fruit and mielie pap (a starchy corn meal like mashed potatoes).
           DSC02772.JPG From Jo’burg we flew to the Cape Town region.  We picked up our rental, a Chevy Spark, from the airport and drove 30 minutes to Stellenbosch.  Our rented apartment was located in a nice neighborhood  with shopping and restaurants within walking distance.  We spent two days exploring the wineries and sampling the various products.  Our favorite winery was the highest one, Uva Mira winery, with its spectacular views of the Indian Ocean. DSC02826.JPG
            From Stellenbosch we drove to a small town just south of Cape Town called Hout Bay.  Our bed and breakfast was outstanding and our hosts pointed us in the direction of Table Mountain.  After a  short scenic ocean side 20 minute drive, we arrived at the funicular tram that took us to the top of the mountain in 5 minutes while rotating  360 degrees for fabulous views en route. Fortunately, we had a beautiful day for viewing Cape Town and the environs. Some days a “table cloth” cloud hovers over the top of Table Mountain making viewing doubtful.
           The following day was also a bright blue  day so we drove into the Victoria and Albert Harbor and booked the ferry boat to Robbin Island.  We were accompanied on board by a class of middle school students who were going to learn aboutDSC02868.JPG Nelson Mandela and the role he played in ending apartheid and developing  South Africa's democracy.  The students had perfect comportment standing in silence waiting for directions from their teachers, something that no American class of middle school students could duplicate. These students were born after Apartheid ended and were excited to visit where Mandela was imprisoned for 18 years. The tour of the prison was informative and former inmates guided us around the facilities showing us where Mandela mined limestone as well as grew his garden located outside his cell. The guides told the visitors numerous personal stories about their own incarcerations. 
           During our last day in Hout Bay we spent visiting the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens. DSC02975.JPG Since it was early spring, the flowers were in full bloom.  Even the spectacular Protea flower (South Africa’s national flower) was bursting with color and variety.
           Our last dinner in Hout Bay was at the Italian restaurant, Cassaricci. It was a delicious meal and  similar to traditional Italian ambiance (loud and crowded).  Earlier in the day we came across the famous Hout Bay twins who sell soap for DSC03016.JPGcharities.  They were quite the sight dressed in bright yellow raincoats and it was intriguing watching them impersonate each other listening to  them both speak and repeat the same words at the same time. (You can see them on YouTube at Hout Bay Soap Twins).
          From Hout Bay we drove south to Simons Town, which is a South African navy port on the Indian Ocean.  We rented an incredible beach house (from VRBO.com).  It was located just a few meters from Boulders Beach.  The house could sleep 12 and had  fantastic balcony views of the bay and Indian Ocean all for the price of about $85 per night.   Boulders beach is a colony for DSC03215.JPG3,000 penguins where you can mingle with and snap close up photos of the South African penguins.
            The following day we drove south to the Cape of Good Hope National Park.  Here we encountered baboons with their young (we had been warned to keep our car doors closed if we got out of the car because the baboonsDSC03153.JPG would enter the car and attempt to start it.), ostriches and their young, numerous birds and a variety of antelopes including  Spring Bok and Impala.  The highlight was when a brilliant gold “Cape Cobra” coiled up and opened his hood in the road, and then vanished just as quickly, before I could focus my camera on it.
           The following day we began our extended drive along the Garden Route from Cape Town to Durban.  This was a five day drive which took us first to the town of Knysha where we stayed in a  gorgeous  bed and breakfast with  a lovely room overlooking the sea.  Our land lord told us that Dave Matthews had stayed in the room we were renting. 
           The next day we were off in the morning and drove as far as Grahamstown.DSC03282_edited-1.JPG  This was a university town where we enjoyed a good dinner and rest at the 137 High Street Bed and Breakfast before departing the following day for Umtata which is in the Eastern Cape Province.  It was in this region that Nelson Mandela was born and lived his early years. Umtata is also a university town where one of the campus’ of the Walter Sisulu University is located.  This area of the Transkei was beautiful. We noticed that as we drove from one region to the next, the economy changed from fishing along the coast, to farming in the higher veld and also logging as we DSC04619.JPGapproached Durban. We saw lots of tribal farms with colorfully painted sod houses with cattle and sheep grazing in fields as well as along the highways.  As we would approach small rural villages we would notice an increase in the number of people walking or hitch hiking into town.  Often times we would see young children (6-8 years old) and elderly women (70’s or older) standing on the highway attempting to sell small bags of fruit.  Never, in our six weeks of traveling, did we see one person begging, despite the fact that unemployment is around 42%.
           From Umtata we drove to industrialized Durban.  In Durban,  we decided to go north and head towards Kruger Park. If we had continued Northeast beyond Durban to the beach side resorts, we would have driven through Swaziland further on enroute to the park.  Our route took us to Pietermaritzburg and then to the town of Ermelo after we passed through Lady Smith, home of the Black Mazombo musical singing group and a coal mining district. In Ermelo, we stayed at a gorgeous bed and breakfast called Angie’s  and were served a great breakfast by Angie, the owner.
          Our final stopping point before arriving in Kruger National Park was in the town of DSC03404.JPGNelspruit located near the south end of Kruger Park.  Here we stayed at the Utopia in Africa guest house.  The spectacular guest house  was built by a world famous architect with African ambiance and served outstanding cuisine for both breakfast and dinner.  We splurged and had both a three course dinner with a bottle of wine as well as requesting laundry service which was extra.  The entire bill was about $135.
           After a quick tour of the nearby Jane Goodalls’ Chimp Conservancy where we had lunch, we were off the next day to Kruger National Park. DSC03923.JPG We arrived at the park entrance (there are several) around 8:00 am.  We were surprised to learn that it would take us about 6 hours to drive up to the Oliphants Rest Area where we had booked five nights in a park rondell. This is a cement round thatched roof cabin grouped near an outdoor kitchen in the campground. Linens, baths, and porch refrigerators were provided making the accommodations comfortable and reasonably priced. In the campgrounds, there were stores, restaurants, gas stations, and tours available.
         DSC03941_edited-1.JPG  Kruger National Park is an intriguing wildlife park.  It is not a zoo.  We discovered that after we had only driven about 2 kilometers.  This was when we saw a group of vultures finishing up on the remains of a giraffe carcass! 
            For the next six hours we drove and stopped at numerous places to observe the wildlife.  By far the most numerous were the Impala.  They wander at the DSC04296.JPG
      side of the road in large packs and cross the road without much regard to the driver. Their nurseries of young are guarded by females and adolescent males.

           By 2:00 P.M., we reached Oliphant's Rest Camp.  After checking in and taking a short siesta we had dinner at the Oliphant's restaurant.  The food was average with the prices moderate.  Families on a budget could prepare meals in the campground kitchens.
           The following day we awoke early and took the road to Letaba.  Along the way we spotted hyena and their young,  as well as Kudzu and other antelope.  Later that evening we took an evening guided tour.  Our guide David, did an excellent job of pointing out various species of birds and animals including giraffe and hippos. DSC03683_edited-1.JPG While we were returning to camp in the dark we had a male lion run along next to our truck.  David slammed on the brakes and the lion ran in front of our truck.  David explained that the lion had been out marking his territory after an afternoon rain and if he had not stopped quickly, the lion would have jumped into our open sided truck!DSC03769_edited-2.JPG
          Over the next several days we arose early for morning drives and in the evening left the camp around 4:00 pm for drives so we could be back when the gates closed at 6:30 pm.  During those days we saw, varieties of antelope,  giraffe, zebra, wildebeest, rhino, lions, hippos, elephants,DSC04094_edited-1.JPG baboons, impala,  water buffalo, cheetahs, and numerous birds including storks and the African eagle.  Because it was spring most animals were with their young.  This was one of the highlights of our trip.  We even extended our Kruger tripDSC03668_edited-1.JPG by two nights and moved to a more southern rest camp named Satari.  The results were the same with  sightings of numerous animals. 
           Before leaving the states my wife requested that we  book a safari.  Upon looking at safari prices, I found the average prices were in the $1,000 per night range per person.  Doing some internet research I found that you can rent a rondell at a rest camp in Krueger Park for around $85 per night.  We chose the least expensive "drive yourself safari". The results were the same and we noticed several private safari trucks touring at midday when the animals were asleep or out of view in the same areas of the park where we had sighted animals earlier.DSC04085.JPG
           Upon leaving Krueger we drove to central South Africa and stayed in the community of Clarens.  This was an interesting town where we stayed at the Lake Clarens Guest House (Where your car is washed every morning).  Big Bad Bruce owns the guest house and also one of the restaurants in town.  In fact, some believe he is the founder of the resort that is Clarens.  He was a pleasant individual and gave us many good tips on seeing things in the vicinity.  On his advice, we drove through the Golden Gates Highlands National Park and to the Basotho Cultural Village.  Both were delightful to visit and learn about the Basotho tribal history.
           The following day we drove to the country of Lesotho.  This was a fascinating day trip into a nation completely surrounded by South Africa. DSC04477.JPG  Fortunately, the citizens of Lesotho were never subjugated by the Dutch South Afrikaners.  They are still very much an agrarian  society.  DSC04481.JPGWe saw numerous
      women carrying goods on their heads as well as men plowing fields with oxen.  As we drove up the mountain to the Katse Dam we encountered women washing clothes in the river, young children caring for cattle and sheep herders attending their flocks.  Unlike South Africa where virtually DSC04467.JPGeveryone speaks English, in Lesotho very few spoke it. Unfortunately, we encountered storms in the mountains and were not able to reach the dam. Rural people in Lesotho wear blankets due to the changing mountainous weather conditions.

           After leaving Clarens the following day, we drove North to Frankfort and reconnected with our Zulu friends, the Mokoenas.  They live in the township of Namahadi  outside of Frankfort.  Here we spent three nights with their family.  Next from Frankfort, we drove with our friends to the Drakensburg Mountains. DSC04650.JPG We spent a night in the town of Underburg.  We enjoyed a lovely dinner at the Flower Inn restaurant and did some hiking in the Drakensburg Mountains  before returning to Frankfort the following day.  The views from the vistas were spectacular.  We never imagined South Africa to be lush, mountainous with flowing mountain streams.
           Upon our return to Frankfort it was time to drive back to Johannesburg.  During our final weekend we included several trips to the Bruma Cultural Market. DSC04876.JPG Here you can find all the souvenirs you could imagine.  Prices are good and bargaining is encouraged. 
           We were also invited to our Zulu friends' cousins’ baby shower.  It was great fun as we were the only whites eating barbeque boerewors (sausage) mielie pap, chakalaka, and salad while laughing at the funny stories the guests were telling about the expectant mother.
           Our last day in Jo’burg  we were chauffeured to the Cradle of Mankind cave and the Maropeng museum.  This is where the earliest humans were found.  They have discovered a human skull which is more than 3 million years old.  All modern day humans can trace their DNA back to central Africa.  In the museum you are greeted by a large sign in the lobby that proclaims “Welcome Home”!  The museum demonstrated how the earth was created and the scientific evolution of mankind through the eyes of Charles Darwin.  In the end the visitor was left with several perplexing questions.DSC04854.JPG “ The world is faced with a dilemma: countries need to develop economically and to do this they need to use natural resources, but at the same time, they need to preserve the environment so that future generations can succeed.”  As Thabo Mbeki, former President of South Africa said, “ A global human society based on poverty for many and prosperity for a few, characterized by islands of wealth surrounded by a sea of poverty is unsustainable.”  Southern Africa has the highest proportion of people living on less than $1 a day.  About 40% of the regions 190 million people live in extreme poverty.  The World Bank estimates that 1.1 billion people live on less than $1 per day.  Humanity’s ecological footprint grew by 150%  between 1961 and 2000.
           South Africa has it’s share of problems including 42% unemployment, high crime rates, and lack of health care in the rural areas.  Our six week journey through South Africa was a real eye opener.  We were encouraged by the friendliness of the people.  All were well dressed and expressed a sense of hopefulness.  They were a proud nation trying to overcome serious problems.  A sign on one of the buildings in downtown Johannesburg summed up the feelings of this nation after the successful 2010 World Cup Soccer championships:  “TODAY THIS IS THE GREATEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD”DSC04862.JPG

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Grenada Unpretentiously Amazin Grenada Unpretentiously Amazing

    • From: spiceislandgirl
    • Description:

      When my friends ask me to visit Grenada, I first had to find a map and remember where it was. I looked around to find possible activities and tourist jaunts.  The island has been pretty quiet since the conflict with the US back in the 80's.  However, they are working to rebound and compete with other West Indian countries for tourism.  One of the first things I notices was the number of waterfalls and beaches, and the Grand Etang National Park.  I know that does not sound all that exciting, but sometimes you have to use your imagination.   I was able to find a package on a well known travel site for around $900 for the whole week.  Less than $1000 air and hotel, it's worth a look and see.  

       

      I arrived on a Friday night around 9:00 pm, everything looked dark.  In the distance, I could see little light twinkling in the sky near  Grand Anse, the city center.  Just great, what has my friend got me into,  I thought.   I paid $1000 to sleep for a week in no man's land.  The taxi transferred us to the hotel.  From my window, I see a few cars on the street, no big bustling commercial centers that I could make out in the dark and no people outside.   I think the only people who were awake were the people who arrived on the flights that evening and where in route to their hotel or abode for the evening.   Alas, on the way I notice a Subway, a sign that there is life, a business I recognize.  It's Friday night, one of the biggest nights for socialization and entertainment everyone is at home.  Did they all leave the island for a holiday.   Ok, I try to stop thinking about the uncertain thoughts of being in the land of the lost, as we arrive at the small boutique hotel.  The lobby is open air; the owner comes down and asks our names.  He picks up the reservation pad, reviews it, takes a key from the hook on the desk, and says, "Let me drive you to your room, it's on a hill."  We put our things in the van and up the hill we go.  The van strains a bit, as it climbs the steep hill, more like a mini-mountain.  He opens the door to the room and tells us, to call the restuarant if we want a snack, even though it’s not customary,  he will give us room service.  After a 3 1/2 hour flight, of course a snack and beverage was welcomed.  

       

      My first impression when I walked into the room was that I had stepped back in time to the 1980's.  The hotel looked literally like it had not had new furniture since, the 1980's.  However, it was clean and they earn the most points with me for that.  I was not moving there for eternity, so the antiquated furniture didn't bother me in the least and I just don't want to get sick or encounter pest during my stay.  

       

      After my snack of delectable fruit punch, a sandwich, and fries.  I proceeded to take a shower and get ready for bed.  It had been a long day, I took once last look out the sliding door facing the dark area that sounded like the ocean and went to sleep.  The next morning, I was awakened to birds, beautiful flower gardens, chirping and a beautiful sunny view that only the mind can imagine.  It was Grand Anse beach and I was a stone's throwaway from it.  The darkness hid the splendor.  I sat on the veranda, for more than an hour watching the ships pass and the waves roll for miles.   

       

      That day, I spent the whole day on the beach.  It was exceptionally clean and was obvious not many people are aware of the treasures for the eyes in Grenada.   A definite positive for me was the fact that the beach was not crowded,  overrun with tourist, and kids running about.  There are a couple hotels that are strategically along the coast; however not enough to spoil the shore like some other islands.

       

      In the afternoon, I went up to the grocery story which was about a 10 minute walk away for water and snacks. The prices were reasonable, and there was a food court nearby serving up local favorite foods and punches.   I would advise against the punches, since they are made from raw fruit and most American's digestive systems are not accustomed to the bacteria encountered from eating raw fruits and vegetables outside the US.   

       

      On Monday, we took a bus up to the Grand Etang National Park to hike.  This was especially refreshing. Once you reach the top at the lookout point, it’s a little cooler and the view is breathtaking.  You may be lucky enough to see some of the small monkeys who inhabit the park.  Just across the road, there is a lake formed from the mouth of a dormant volcano, rumored to be many miles deep and home to a mermaid.  The story of the mermaid cannot be confirmed, as I did not see her.   There is lore that people who drown in the lake are found on other islands. The signage prohibits fishing and swimming.  However, there are picnic tables and pavilions perfect for a small lunch or shelter if it rains during your visit.  There is also a restaurant in the park which provides sandwiches and refreshments.   Plan at least 3 to 4 hours or longer depending on how well you enjoy nature.   It is recommended you wear hiking shoes on this excursion.  The hills are slippery and the park is in the rainforest, so the trails are damp.  This is an easy hike and a good one for the entire family. 

       

      Our next day trip was to Mt. Carmel Falls.  This was a decent 30 to 45 minute hike.  To get to the falls, we climbed over two, three foot around rocks.   While on the island, we also visited The Falls of the Seven Sisters and Annandale Falls.  All the falls have a different appeal.  Mt. Carmel's Falls are huge and the water continually falls in big sheets from the colossal rocks which look like a wall.  To get to the Seven Sister's you must hike for around an hour, around some twists and turns, slippery slopes, and once you reach is a tricky maze of boulders connected across a stream and to see all seven (7) falls you must be an expert hiker. Make sure you have plenty of water for this one and that you are in pretty good physical condition.  The Annandale Falls is just like a city park.  You drive in and walk down steps to the falls.  It is very easy to navigate.  If you like you can take a walk in the rocky pools and see the different creatures that inhabit.  This one is a fun one for the kids, you don't have to worry about it not being safe.  There are still more falls to visit in the country. 

       

      The following day, we set out to find the Claibone Springs, a natural hot spring.  It took many twists and turns. By the way, few roads in Grenada are marked.  The drive up into the mountains was relaxing. There are very few hairpin curves to unnerve you.   Most of the day, we asked for directions and everyone pointed in a different direction.  However, it was all cool, we were on vacation. So, there was no time schedule.  By the evening, we finally had navigated the mountains.  In real time, it took around an hour of drive time and another hour or so to sift through the lush vegetation.  We followed the sounds to find the spring. It was quite a treat once; we arrived and put on our swimsuits to bathe in nature's hot tub. I don't know if the stories are true about healing and rejuvenation, but the water was clear until we disturbed the sulphur sediment on the bottom.  We felt so good after our bath; we drove back into town, had dinner and caught a movie.  

       

      I could talk for many pages about the natural wonders of Grenada, the Spice Island. Let me not forget to mention, the Clark's Court rum tour, the Belmont Estates, River Antoine, Chef Castle in Excel Plaza, and Levera Point.  If you go to Levera at the right time of the year you can see the sea turtles hatching. Needless to say, I have plans to return.  This is the place to go if you are a nature lover.  I was never concerned about my safety, even though I still recommend using the same vacation precautions, you would use in any other place.  Don't let the darkness of night fool you, it is truly amazing.  

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Front View of the Village Front View of the Village

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 197
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  • Hammock House Hammock House

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 600
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  • Entrance to the Reserve Entrance to the Reserve

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 439
    • Not yet rated
  • Taking a Swim Taking a Swim

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 546
    • Not yet rated
  • View of the Dock View of the Dock

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 489
    • Not yet rated
  • Local Guides Local Guides

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 390
    • Not yet rated
  • Floating Foliage Floating Foliage

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 373
    • Not yet rated
  • Amazon Insect Amazon Insect

    • From: amyharmony
    • Description:

      Photos of Tapiche Ohara's Reserve (greentrack@gmail.com). The Reserve is situated 340 km up river from Iquitos, Peru on the Tapiche River in the district of Requena, accessible only by waterway. The Tapiche Ohara's Reserve comprises several types of lowland Amazonian forests, including igapo, varzea, and terra firme during dry season. The Reserve represents one of the few areas in the Amazon Basin where these forest types can be found in close proximity. Among the animals found here are Pink River Dolphins, Manatee, Jaguar, Ocelot, Margay, Giant Otter, Red Huakari Monkey and Paiche (world's largest freshwater fish), and an amazing variety of birds (over 700 species are known in Loreto), including the Harpy Eagle. The 1540 hectare Reserve is an exceptional storehouse of Amazon jungle biodiversity. This area spans both sides of the Tapiche River east of the Ucayali River. Within the Reserve there are four different springs which are tributaries into the Tapiche. Furthermore, there are several onboxes and lagoons of considerable size. Other than the Tapiche, which is a black river, all the other rivers are full of inorganic material, which is generally typical of Andean sources, but not typical to the Amazon rainforest. These factors, along with the Pleistocene Refugia and river dynamics, contribute to an exceptionally diverse assemblage of primates. 

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5H7LPIi_dAk        http://www.greentrack-jungle.com

       

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 341
    • Not yet rated
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