•  
Results 1 - 20 of 139

139 Search Results for "funny"

  • San Francisco, May 2013 Day 3- San Francisco, May 2013 Day 3- Walking through Tenderloin alone…

    • From: jetsettindaisy
    • Description:

      So I started my day by catching the Big Bus to a stop in Civic Center and walking to Brenda’s French Soul Food. Funny story, my friend sent me a long list of places to try and most of them were already bookmarked 941954_10100165333377618_574131279_n.jpgso I’m guessing I picked good places. Anyhow, the walk was interesting but it was 11AM so I didn’t feel particularly unsafe. The beignets were worth the walk. I had looked at the menu and was unsure if I could eat an order of 3 when I was told I could order individuals. I had two large beignets (crawfish and traditional) for about $5. I wish I could have taken home a cooler full but that would just be stupid.

       

      My friend Michelle was meeting with me for lunch later, so I decided to try and cram in a969077_10100165333163048_264062609_n.jpg few more sights first. Frankly, I should have taken a cab from the restaurant to Lombard Street but here’s what I did instead: I walked from Civic center through Tenderloin back to Union Square. I waited for a bus that never showed up for about fifteen minutes. I took a taxi from Union Square to Lombard Street. Sound smart? No? I didn’t think so. I walked down Lombard Street and took photos before walking down to Fisherman’s Wharf. I chatted with my mother on the phone. She asked if I knew where I was going and if it was a long walk. I said I was walking towards the water. Sounded like the best decision.

       

      392366_10100164108267748_1537655849_n.jpgBy the time I got there, I was kind of hungry again (all those damn hills). I had seen Guardino’s the day before and lusted after the lobster roll so I got one. I ate it on the way to Pier 39 where I stopped at Trish’s Mini Donuts and hunted down seals. My mom tells me that 30 years ago, Pier 39 had a hole in the ground and you could see the seals from there. I looked for a hole in the ground. I saw double doors and people, so I followed it. I’ve never seen so many seals in my life. That was definitely not a hole in the ground.Seals

       

      As I made my way back to Fisherman’s Wharf to catch the bus back to Union Square, I stopped at the Boudin Museum. I had a coupon from the café the day before so the tour was $2. Pretty fun and free bread. I also found out that my bread personality is a Ciabatta.

       

      I met up with Michelle at Samovar Tea Lounge in Yerba Buena Gardens. Not really my kind of place but delicious matcha shake. I was pretty full so I didn’t eat much but we hung out and chatted and enjoyed the view. After this I went back to Union Square to do some actual shopping. I made another stop at Tout Sweet (I never stop at a place more than once) and walked around for a while. I got all my shopping done then grabbed a 3.JPGdrink at Farallon’s Jellyfish Lounge (awesome $6 happy hour and really good truffle fries).

       

      At this point I realized that I had done everything on my checklist except for the Ferry Building which I was planning to do on Day 4. So I did something I never do. I went back to the hotel to watch television. My feet were killing me and I was starting to feel fatigued, so I figured this was the best course of action (plus the iPhone needed2.JPG charging). I started packing and watched TV for a couple hours and then got ready for dinner with Carla and my cousin Kim.

       

      Carla met up with me in Union Square and we made our way over to E&O for dinner. Kim met up with us here. I had heard that the corn fritters were on The Best Thing I Ever Ate on the Food Network so we ordered them. They were okay. I’m not usually disappointed with Food Network recommendations but in this case I was. After dinner, we walked over to Sir Francis Drake and took the elevator up to the Starlight Room. I figured a great view of the city on a clear night was a wonderful way to close out my trip. We had dessert and I enjoyed an Absinthe cocktail and a sugar high. At the end of the night, I said goodbye to Carla and Kim and headed back to the hotel.

    • Blog post
    • 10 months ago
    • Views: 251
    • Not yet rated
  • Paris Hot Sex Shop Paris Hot Sex Shop

    • From: dlj668
    • Description:

      While walking around in Paris near the Moulin Rouge, I happened to see this funny combination of signs. The sign in the background reads "HOTEL", but I could only see the first three letters above the "SEX SHOP" sign in the foreground. 

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 1685
    • Not yet rated
  • Funny but not really! Funny but not really!

    • From: DWaiste
    • Description:

      Sign located in Kapaa, Kauai on the lawn of a local church.  Sure hope people got the point!

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 603
    • Not yet rated
  • Slepering When Wet Slepering When Wet

    • From: roadlizard
    • Description:

      A funny sign at the Dzitnup cenote near Valladolid, Mexico.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 532
    • Not yet rated
  • kimberlybosgat

    • Points:652
    • Views: 51
    • Since: 2 years ago
    • Not yet rated
  • robertjohn28

    • Points:652
    • Views: 208
    • Since: 2 years ago
    • Not yet rated
  • motimoti

    • Points:502
    • Views: 111
    • Since: 2 years ago
    • Not yet rated
  • fogscom

    • Points:652
    • Views: 57
    • Since: 2 years ago
    • Not yet rated
  • The Ship's Cat The Ship's Cat

    • From: hbwoods
    • Description:

      During our Russian river cruise we had the pleasure of the ship's cat.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 1278
  • Go on Safari! In Georgia? Go on Safari! In Georgia?

    • From: plonde
    • Description:

      At the Wild Animal Safari in Pine Mountain, GA they sell slobber towels with good reason. The animals know that there's food in them thar cars and they come INSIDE to get it!

      Here's the skinny: you wander around (by-foot) a zoo-like experience with reptiles and miscellaneous animals while you wait for your turn to drive through the "safari." If you go on Labor Day weekend you'll be waiting a while. So be patient, young jedi.

      You have the choice of driving your own car through the route or renting one of theirs. I cannot express firmly enough that you must rent their car. As mentioned above, the animals come not just close to your car, but in it! Why? Because you have treats. Think of yourself like the Ice Cream Man of the safari/zoo and everyone comes running.

      You wander curving roads of Georgia's red clay and observe animals in their semi-natural habitat. It is hot in the South. Same as Africa? I don't know such things. Some of the animals are amazing, many are funny in their behavior, and the experience will surely be one of delight (I had never had a bull eat from my hand before), goo (see "delight"), and lots of laughter.

      Have been on a real safari? (how do you think it compares?) Have you had a wild animal eat from your hands (even if that wild animal had been tamed by thousands of tourists before you)?

      Click here to see the slideshow.

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 389
    • Not yet rated
  • SIX WEEKS IN SOUTH AFRICA SIX WEEKS IN SOUTH AFRICA

    • From: Dan Beamer
    • Description:

           My wife and I arrived in Johannesburg on a mild spring afternoon.  Our bed and breakfast was located in Little Linden literally yards from the old Linden farm where Nelson Mandela and the ANC  plotted the demise of the white South African government in the early 1950’s and 60’s.  Being in our mid sixties we were a little hesitant in our plan to drive around South Africa.
        DSC02654 - Copy - Copy_edited-1.JPG Our first full day, we visited the Apartheid Museum which was a fascinating look at the history of Apartheid in South Africa. It is really a tribute to Nelson Mandela. DSC02648 - Copy - Copy.JPG From the museum we had our driver take us  to Soweto where we visited Mandela’s first house and learned that Desmond Tutu was a neighbor of the Mandelas. Two Nobel Peace Prize winners were living a block away from each other.  While in Soweto we walked over to the Hector Peterson Memorial.  This plaza commemorated when the students of Soweto walked out of their classrooms on June 16, 1976 to protest the mandatory teaching of all subjects in Afrikans language,  the language spoken by whites in South Africa. Thirteen year old Hector Peterson was killed at this demonstration which led to a prolonged walk out by black South African students and triggered the fall of Aparteid.

           The following day our South African friends drove to Jo’burg to visit us before we departed for Cape Town.  Our friends are Zulus and live in the province of the Free State, south of Johannesburg. We met them while they were on a Fulbright teacher exchange in the states a couple of years ago. We enjoyed a traditional Braai (barbeque),  with sausages, fruit and mielie pap (a starchy corn meal like mashed potatoes).
           DSC02772.JPG From Jo’burg we flew to the Cape Town region.  We picked up our rental, a Chevy Spark, from the airport and drove 30 minutes to Stellenbosch.  Our rented apartment was located in a nice neighborhood  with shopping and restaurants within walking distance.  We spent two days exploring the wineries and sampling the various products.  Our favorite winery was the highest one, Uva Mira winery, with its spectacular views of the Indian Ocean. DSC02826.JPG
            From Stellenbosch we drove to a small town just south of Cape Town called Hout Bay.  Our bed and breakfast was outstanding and our hosts pointed us in the direction of Table Mountain.  After a  short scenic ocean side 20 minute drive, we arrived at the funicular tram that took us to the top of the mountain in 5 minutes while rotating  360 degrees for fabulous views en route. Fortunately, we had a beautiful day for viewing Cape Town and the environs. Some days a “table cloth” cloud hovers over the top of Table Mountain making viewing doubtful.
           The following day was also a bright blue  day so we drove into the Victoria and Albert Harbor and booked the ferry boat to Robbin Island.  We were accompanied on board by a class of middle school students who were going to learn aboutDSC02868.JPG Nelson Mandela and the role he played in ending apartheid and developing  South Africa's democracy.  The students had perfect comportment standing in silence waiting for directions from their teachers, something that no American class of middle school students could duplicate. These students were born after Apartheid ended and were excited to visit where Mandela was imprisoned for 18 years. The tour of the prison was informative and former inmates guided us around the facilities showing us where Mandela mined limestone as well as grew his garden located outside his cell. The guides told the visitors numerous personal stories about their own incarcerations. 
           During our last day in Hout Bay we spent visiting the Kirstenbosch Botanical Gardens. DSC02975.JPG Since it was early spring, the flowers were in full bloom.  Even the spectacular Protea flower (South Africa’s national flower) was bursting with color and variety.
           Our last dinner in Hout Bay was at the Italian restaurant, Cassaricci. It was a delicious meal and  similar to traditional Italian ambiance (loud and crowded).  Earlier in the day we came across the famous Hout Bay twins who sell soap for DSC03016.JPGcharities.  They were quite the sight dressed in bright yellow raincoats and it was intriguing watching them impersonate each other listening to  them both speak and repeat the same words at the same time. (You can see them on YouTube at Hout Bay Soap Twins).
          From Hout Bay we drove south to Simons Town, which is a South African navy port on the Indian Ocean.  We rented an incredible beach house (from VRBO.com).  It was located just a few meters from Boulders Beach.  The house could sleep 12 and had  fantastic balcony views of the bay and Indian Ocean all for the price of about $85 per night.   Boulders beach is a colony for DSC03215.JPG3,000 penguins where you can mingle with and snap close up photos of the South African penguins.
            The following day we drove south to the Cape of Good Hope National Park.  Here we encountered baboons with their young (we had been warned to keep our car doors closed if we got out of the car because the baboonsDSC03153.JPG would enter the car and attempt to start it.), ostriches and their young, numerous birds and a variety of antelopes including  Spring Bok and Impala.  The highlight was when a brilliant gold “Cape Cobra” coiled up and opened his hood in the road, and then vanished just as quickly, before I could focus my camera on it.
           The following day we began our extended drive along the Garden Route from Cape Town to Durban.  This was a five day drive which took us first to the town of Knysha where we stayed in a  gorgeous  bed and breakfast with  a lovely room overlooking the sea.  Our land lord told us that Dave Matthews had stayed in the room we were renting. 
           The next day we were off in the morning and drove as far as Grahamstown.DSC03282_edited-1.JPG  This was a university town where we enjoyed a good dinner and rest at the 137 High Street Bed and Breakfast before departing the following day for Umtata which is in the Eastern Cape Province.  It was in this region that Nelson Mandela was born and lived his early years. Umtata is also a university town where one of the campus’ of the Walter Sisulu University is located.  This area of the Transkei was beautiful. We noticed that as we drove from one region to the next, the economy changed from fishing along the coast, to farming in the higher veld and also logging as we DSC04619.JPGapproached Durban. We saw lots of tribal farms with colorfully painted sod houses with cattle and sheep grazing in fields as well as along the highways.  As we would approach small rural villages we would notice an increase in the number of people walking or hitch hiking into town.  Often times we would see young children (6-8 years old) and elderly women (70’s or older) standing on the highway attempting to sell small bags of fruit.  Never, in our six weeks of traveling, did we see one person begging, despite the fact that unemployment is around 42%.
           From Umtata we drove to industrialized Durban.  In Durban,  we decided to go north and head towards Kruger Park. If we had continued Northeast beyond Durban to the beach side resorts, we would have driven through Swaziland further on enroute to the park.  Our route took us to Pietermaritzburg and then to the town of Ermelo after we passed through Lady Smith, home of the Black Mazombo musical singing group and a coal mining district. In Ermelo, we stayed at a gorgeous bed and breakfast called Angie’s  and were served a great breakfast by Angie, the owner.
          Our final stopping point before arriving in Kruger National Park was in the town of DSC03404.JPGNelspruit located near the south end of Kruger Park.  Here we stayed at the Utopia in Africa guest house.  The spectacular guest house  was built by a world famous architect with African ambiance and served outstanding cuisine for both breakfast and dinner.  We splurged and had both a three course dinner with a bottle of wine as well as requesting laundry service which was extra.  The entire bill was about $135.
           After a quick tour of the nearby Jane Goodalls’ Chimp Conservancy where we had lunch, we were off the next day to Kruger National Park. DSC03923.JPG We arrived at the park entrance (there are several) around 8:00 am.  We were surprised to learn that it would take us about 6 hours to drive up to the Oliphants Rest Area where we had booked five nights in a park rondell. This is a cement round thatched roof cabin grouped near an outdoor kitchen in the campground. Linens, baths, and porch refrigerators were provided making the accommodations comfortable and reasonably priced. In the campgrounds, there were stores, restaurants, gas stations, and tours available.
         DSC03941_edited-1.JPG  Kruger National Park is an intriguing wildlife park.  It is not a zoo.  We discovered that after we had only driven about 2 kilometers.  This was when we saw a group of vultures finishing up on the remains of a giraffe carcass! 
            For the next six hours we drove and stopped at numerous places to observe the wildlife.  By far the most numerous were the Impala.  They wander at the DSC04296.JPG
      side of the road in large packs and cross the road without much regard to the driver. Their nurseries of young are guarded by females and adolescent males.

           By 2:00 P.M., we reached Oliphant's Rest Camp.  After checking in and taking a short siesta we had dinner at the Oliphant's restaurant.  The food was average with the prices moderate.  Families on a budget could prepare meals in the campground kitchens.
           The following day we awoke early and took the road to Letaba.  Along the way we spotted hyena and their young,  as well as Kudzu and other antelope.  Later that evening we took an evening guided tour.  Our guide David, did an excellent job of pointing out various species of birds and animals including giraffe and hippos. DSC03683_edited-1.JPG While we were returning to camp in the dark we had a male lion run along next to our truck.  David slammed on the brakes and the lion ran in front of our truck.  David explained that the lion had been out marking his territory after an afternoon rain and if he had not stopped quickly, the lion would have jumped into our open sided truck!DSC03769_edited-2.JPG
          Over the next several days we arose early for morning drives and in the evening left the camp around 4:00 pm for drives so we could be back when the gates closed at 6:30 pm.  During those days we saw, varieties of antelope,  giraffe, zebra, wildebeest, rhino, lions, hippos, elephants,DSC04094_edited-1.JPG baboons, impala,  water buffalo, cheetahs, and numerous birds including storks and the African eagle.  Because it was spring most animals were with their young.  This was one of the highlights of our trip.  We even extended our Kruger tripDSC03668_edited-1.JPG by two nights and moved to a more southern rest camp named Satari.  The results were the same with  sightings of numerous animals. 
           Before leaving the states my wife requested that we  book a safari.  Upon looking at safari prices, I found the average prices were in the $1,000 per night range per person.  Doing some internet research I found that you can rent a rondell at a rest camp in Krueger Park for around $85 per night.  We chose the least expensive "drive yourself safari". The results were the same and we noticed several private safari trucks touring at midday when the animals were asleep or out of view in the same areas of the park where we had sighted animals earlier.DSC04085.JPG
           Upon leaving Krueger we drove to central South Africa and stayed in the community of Clarens.  This was an interesting town where we stayed at the Lake Clarens Guest House (Where your car is washed every morning).  Big Bad Bruce owns the guest house and also one of the restaurants in town.  In fact, some believe he is the founder of the resort that is Clarens.  He was a pleasant individual and gave us many good tips on seeing things in the vicinity.  On his advice, we drove through the Golden Gates Highlands National Park and to the Basotho Cultural Village.  Both were delightful to visit and learn about the Basotho tribal history.
           The following day we drove to the country of Lesotho.  This was a fascinating day trip into a nation completely surrounded by South Africa. DSC04477.JPG  Fortunately, the citizens of Lesotho were never subjugated by the Dutch South Afrikaners.  They are still very much an agrarian  society.  DSC04481.JPGWe saw numerous
      women carrying goods on their heads as well as men plowing fields with oxen.  As we drove up the mountain to the Katse Dam we encountered women washing clothes in the river, young children caring for cattle and sheep herders attending their flocks.  Unlike South Africa where virtually DSC04467.JPGeveryone speaks English, in Lesotho very few spoke it. Unfortunately, we encountered storms in the mountains and were not able to reach the dam. Rural people in Lesotho wear blankets due to the changing mountainous weather conditions.

           After leaving Clarens the following day, we drove North to Frankfort and reconnected with our Zulu friends, the Mokoenas.  They live in the township of Namahadi  outside of Frankfort.  Here we spent three nights with their family.  Next from Frankfort, we drove with our friends to the Drakensburg Mountains. DSC04650.JPG We spent a night in the town of Underburg.  We enjoyed a lovely dinner at the Flower Inn restaurant and did some hiking in the Drakensburg Mountains  before returning to Frankfort the following day.  The views from the vistas were spectacular.  We never imagined South Africa to be lush, mountainous with flowing mountain streams.
           Upon our return to Frankfort it was time to drive back to Johannesburg.  During our final weekend we included several trips to the Bruma Cultural Market. DSC04876.JPG Here you can find all the souvenirs you could imagine.  Prices are good and bargaining is encouraged. 
           We were also invited to our Zulu friends' cousins’ baby shower.  It was great fun as we were the only whites eating barbeque boerewors (sausage) mielie pap, chakalaka, and salad while laughing at the funny stories the guests were telling about the expectant mother.
           Our last day in Jo’burg  we were chauffeured to the Cradle of Mankind cave and the Maropeng museum.  This is where the earliest humans were found.  They have discovered a human skull which is more than 3 million years old.  All modern day humans can trace their DNA back to central Africa.  In the museum you are greeted by a large sign in the lobby that proclaims “Welcome Home”!  The museum demonstrated how the earth was created and the scientific evolution of mankind through the eyes of Charles Darwin.  In the end the visitor was left with several perplexing questions.DSC04854.JPG “ The world is faced with a dilemma: countries need to develop economically and to do this they need to use natural resources, but at the same time, they need to preserve the environment so that future generations can succeed.”  As Thabo Mbeki, former President of South Africa said, “ A global human society based on poverty for many and prosperity for a few, characterized by islands of wealth surrounded by a sea of poverty is unsustainable.”  Southern Africa has the highest proportion of people living on less than $1 a day.  About 40% of the regions 190 million people live in extreme poverty.  The World Bank estimates that 1.1 billion people live on less than $1 per day.  Humanity’s ecological footprint grew by 150%  between 1961 and 2000.
           South Africa has it’s share of problems including 42% unemployment, high crime rates, and lack of health care in the rural areas.  Our six week journey through South Africa was a real eye opener.  We were encouraged by the friendliness of the people.  All were well dressed and expressed a sense of hopefulness.  They were a proud nation trying to overcome serious problems.  A sign on one of the buildings in downtown Johannesburg summed up the feelings of this nation after the successful 2010 World Cup Soccer championships:  “TODAY THIS IS THE GREATEST COUNTRY IN THE WORLD”DSC04862.JPG

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 1478
    • Not yet rated
  • A Different Perspective on Apr A Different Perspective on Apron Strings

    • From: plonde
    • Description:

      What a delight! The Apron Museum in Iuka, MS has antique aprons dating back to the Civil War. Fancy aprons and work aprons.

      It started because the owner read books that included characters who wear aprons and that caught her attention.

      Most of the collection features home-made pieces, which are special to the person's interests. There are hundreds of aprons here, some on display, some crushed on racks. They're funny and endearing.

      There are the ones that are too frilly for actual use—these were worn after the cooking was done but to show your man that you spent the day working.

      I prefer those that are love-worn, soft and weathered, stained and spattered; like life.

      Do you wear a funny apron?
      Do aprons play a part of your family history and memories?

      Click here to see the slideshow.

       

      www.AmericanaTheBeautiful.org

      @AmericanaBtiful

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 224
    • Not yet rated
  • Spectacular Switzerland! Spectacular Switzerland!

    • From: Gailhennessey
    • Description:

      Hope our eight day trip to Switzerland may give others some ideas if they are planning such a trip. We had a wonderful time! We arrived in Zurich and proceeded to go to Mt. Rigi mountain summit outside of Luzerne for the night. We took a boat ride and then a cog train to the summit of about 6000 ft. where the hotel, Rigi Kulm was located. We had fantastic sunset views and a good dinner. We had a great view of the mountains from our room. Interestingly, there is a marker on the summit where surveyors base their calculations for the entire country of Switzerland. The next morning, we left the hotel and heard a Alpine horn being played. With the cow bells and the horn, I felt we were definitely in Switzerland.

       

      The next day we traveled by train about 2 hours to the traditional town of Appenzell. We had lunch in the town and were thrilled that the annual tradition of bringing cows down from the mountain for the winter took place during our visit. I had contacted Appenzell tourism before leaving and they said the festival is determined by the cows and there wasn’t an actual date but that it was usually in September.The young children and adults were dressed in traditional outfits and the cows, many had flower headdresses. It was a beautiful event to see. We also said two other such parades from the train at two other stops along the way. We then traveled back to Zurich area by train and then by boat and stayed with my cousin in her village of Richtersvil. Johanna Spryi wrote the story Heidi in the nearby town. Went for dinner at a local restaurant , Restaurant Freihof,and ate on the terrace.

       

      The next morning, we took the train to Luzerne and did a walking tour of the city. We climbed up to the old bell tower and walked a bit of the old fortress wall. We went through the old city, buildings dating to the early 1300s,many with paintings on them, and saw the lion monument. Stayed at the Hotel Waldstatterhof. It was expensive but due to a classic music festival, most hotels were booked. It was a very beautiful hotel, but then, again for $280 for the night...it should be. Great location, across from the train station.

       

      The next day we went by train for the town of Andermatt to board the Glacier Express for the town of Zermatt. This was the only really cold day, glad we packed our winter coats. There were snow flurries in the air. We had coffee at a cute bakery as we waited for the “red train” to arrive. The hours on the train went fast as the views were spectacular as the train weaved around up and down valleys and into the mountains. Arrived in Zermatt and our hotel, the Hotel Butterfly. With flowers everywhere, Zermatt is a beautiful place to visit! Very touristy but you can see the Matterhorn as you walk the streets. The hotel, a Best Western was great.The meals were reasonable for Swiss standards where everything is expensive. Four men were playing Alpine horns so we stopped to listen to two of their songs.

       

      Another beautiful day, and we went up to the Gornergrat summit, around 10,000 ft., by way of a train that hugged the edge of the mountain. Amazing feat of engineering to build this railway! I was a bit dizzy until I acclimated to the heights.The views were amazing. Glaciers, Matterhorn....just spectacular! Decided to hike down some of the mountain. We traveled down one train stop, Rotenboden, and meet a German couple that helped get us on our way as there were no actually paths down the mountain. We stopped at a lake and the man told us that this was a famous place to take a picture of the Matterhorn as it is reflected in the water. I got a great shot. As we walked down the mountain, we were glad we had our winter coats but quickly shed them as we got warmer. We were able to yodel at one point and both of us said we loved the other to hear an echo. As we continued down, I heard “cow bells” but we came upon a bunch of black goats with white backing wearing the bells. They were so cute and friendly, I got up close and took some great photographs. We felt that we’d had enough walking and stopped at the next station to get the train back to the valley. The train was broken and not running so we had a rest and decided, the weather was great, so why not continue walking down the mountain. We went to the next station and got the train, having walked for a couple of hours. Later in the day, we took a cable car to a village called Furi and walked(yes, again) about 50 minutes to the village of Blatten. Black wooden buildings, the traditional Swiss village look, with nothing but a couple of houses, a tiny church and a small restaurant. We treated ourselves to some ice cream and I found the Ricola Herb Garden, one of several around Switzerland where they get their natural ingredients to make their cough drops. Walked all the way back to Zermatt, another 50 minutes or so. We were exhausted.

       

      Left by train from Zermatt to Montreaux(French area of Switzerland by Lake Geneva) and took the Golden Pass, on a classic train, with wood paneling, to Interlaken. Although a beautiful ride, I wouldn’t recommend it, suggesting going right to Interlaken from Visp, saving a couple of hours of travel time. I am sure that the other train’s route was also beautiful. Got to Interlaken and we took a cable car to Lauterbrunnen. From there, we took a small train that hugged the mountain to the alpine village of Murren. Think traditional Swiss village and this was it. I pinched myself a few times as I walked around the village, listening to cow bells and staring at the Jungfrau Mountains, Eiger and Monch. Spectacular views. I would definitely come to Murren again! The Hotel Eiger was wonderful.What a picture perfect Alpine community. The price is about what we paid at other hotels(around $250 a night with a view of the Eiger, Monch and Jungfrau)-less without the view but isn't that why you want to stay in an Alpine village? There is a pool and the rooms are a nice size with a modern bathroom(robes/slippers, too).The owners were wonderfully helpful and friendly. They offered a reception for all the guests once a week, champagne flowing freely with the owners coming to speak with all the guests. Dinner is an experience with the staff coming to show the meal for your inspection before serving it.We had a large portion of a chicken dish, with Swiss potatoes and veggies AND, then,we were offered-seconds!!!!! (All for about $28 dollars per person). You could get a complete meal for $50 but we didn't wish all the different courses. Breakfast was included in the price with lots of choices AND more champagne!

       

      We hiked down from the mountain village of Murren, to Gimmerwald, a very small village. There was an honesty store, where you leave the money for items purchased. A small school was recently closed(only about 12 students) and I was told Murren’s school was closing, too. Kids will have to take cable car/train to the school in Lauterbrunnen Valley.It was fun walking down the mountain, stopped to see some construction men working on building avalanche barriers. Took the cable car to the valley where we took a bus to the Trummelback Falles. Ten glacier water falls(water from the glaciers of the Jungfrau, Monch and Eiger Mts.) are found INSIDE the mountain! It is the only such place in Europe where you can still go inside the mountain to see the falls. It took 15 years and workers using only pickaxes to build the inside walkways. Walked more to another falls where I went up to see it(traveling up stairways and through a tunnel). Met up with a base jumper(the Lauterbrunnen Valley is THE place to base jump). He had “wings” that he used to glide through the air before releasing a parachute.Walked the rest of the way to Lauterbrunnen and then took the bus back to the cable car to Murren. Bed was turned down and a chocolate was on the pillow when we came back after dinner at the Hotel Eiger Restaurant.

       

      We had thought to take the cable car to the Schilthorn, about 12,000 ft. but the video showed the summit was cloudy and you couldn’t see anything. And, for about $100 per person, we decided to pass. Instead, we sat and watched hang gliders take off from a running point in Murren. We also had fun watching a parade of cows(two wearing pine tree hats with colorful flowers) come down from the mountain as we had seen in Appenzell. A couple of goats came, too. The men weren’t dressed in traditional clothing. Funny, the entire parade of men/animals boarded a cable card down to the valley! Spoke in length to a couple from Great Britain and another couple from the states(they hiked 4 hours to a place for the night without electricity or plumbing! Yikes!) One of the wonderful things about traveling is the meeting of people from all over the world. Interestingly, I read that only 20% of Americans have a passport! The world is a much smaller place when you don’t experience the world around you and the people that help make up that world!

       

      Make sure to get a Swiss Pass. It makes traveling by trains so much easier,not having to worry about getting tickets. With the pass, boat rides are free as are many cable cars(others are 1/2 price!).

       

      Gail Hennessey: http://www.gailhennessey.com

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 801
    • Not yet rated
  • Hill Family Eurotrip 2011 Hill Family Eurotrip 2011

    • From: pacsman72
    • Description:

      Well, we are embarking on our second trip to Europe. This time we'll explore the French Alps from Chamonix. Then its off to Reggello, Italy for some Chianti and bruschetta. After 3 days under the Tuscan Sun, we'll head north to the Swiss alpine car-free village of Murren. After spending a night relaxing at a farmhouse near Annecy, we'll fly from Geneva to Dublin, Ireland for a few nights in Kenmare.  

      Next on the checklist:

      • Buy travel insurance
      • Reconfirm all hotels bookings (for some reason you need to do this with some European hotels)
      • Set up the car rentals
      • Buy some cash (before the US dollar slides to a negative value)
      • Buy some clothes that don't make me scream: "I'm an American tourist! Please, somebody rob me and tell me how much you can't stand (former) President Bush!" (no AE or Hollister allowed)

      More to come...

       

      April 17, 2011

      Six weeks to go. Ok, bought TravelGuard insurance after they matched TravelEx's "kids included" policy. They won me over by having a 24x7 customer service line (something TravelEx doesn't have... I like to talk to a human being before buying stuff). We did double the medical expense and evacuation policy for an extra $13 per person. Altogether, the policy was about $250 for all 5 of us. 

      All hotels are finally booked but still need to reconfirm before we leave. While in Italy, we'll be staying at an agriturismo in Regello.These are great alternatives to hotels and B&B's as they are working farms. The Agriturismo Savernanomakes their own chianti and olive oil. And, for a special treat (and the girls don't know this yet.. its a surprise), I have a made a reservation for our last night in Europe at the Ritz-Carlton Powerscourt in County Wicklow, Ireland. I cashed in my Marriott Rewards points for the occasion - trying to keep in the spirit of being budget minded. 

      I purchased some euros this week. The US dollar just continues to slide - we got a rate of about $1.50 per euro after the bank fees. Honestly, I was to listen to the advice of others and wait until I got to Europe. At the current rate, we could spending $1.65 per euro by then. I will need to pick up Swiss Francs next week. 

      Next on the list...

      • Still need to do some clothes shopping.. how do you pack for Italy and Ireland? 
      • Set up the emergency contact lists, photocopies of the passports, and arrange a neighbor to take care of the cats. Funny, I thought my wife said these things take care of themselves?
      • I like to do a trial "pack night" - this kind of gets everyone in the mood and builds up the anticipation of a long journey. We have a everyone pack their bag and carry it around. If I hear any whining in the first 10 minutes, they need to take out some stuff. I am making the new rule this year... EVERYONE MUST CARRY THEIR OWN BAG!!!!
      • Get the Swiss Francs before they too get out of control...
      • Might make some changes on the rental car in Ireland... getting more nervous about trying a manual this time "whilst" driving on the left. 
    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 1075
    • Not yet rated
  • Wanderlust Tales, Shrewsbury, Wanderlust Tales, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England

    • From: bevandlee
    • Description:

      ……Shrewsbury, Shropshire, England

       

      The gardener was stooped over tenderly trimming some stems off the costmary herb that grew in the beds of the yard. He stopped his work and with one hand supporting his aging back, slowly stood erect to smile and greet me as I walked by.

       

      We stood there and visited on soil that he has turned and nurtured for years to coax life out of dried seeds and into fragrant herbs and native perennials.

       

      We talked about the history of this very spot near what still stands of the Shrewsbury Abbey. The 11th century monastery that once stood here was the site of many fictional Brother Cadfael Mysteries, one of my favorite public television programs. As we spoke, I tried to imagine what life might have been like for my ancestors that lived near here.

       

      “Your family is from here? he asked.

       

      “Yes, but a couple generations ago. It’s funny but I feel a connection to the area just the same.” It was true, something about this place felt intimate and familiar.

       

      “Wait here for one minute, please. I have something for you.”  He left me and headed to the work shed, quickly returning with a shy grin and gloved-hand wrapped around a small object.

       

      He reaches out and slips the object in my hand. It looks like a porous red stone whose edges have been softened by time and elements.

       

      “It’s a piece of the Abbey.” He says. “Now and then, little bits of it work their way up from the earth as I am tilling the soil.” “It’s so you can remember where you came from”.

       

      I was certain I would never forget.

    • Blog post
    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 765
  • The best of Africa: it's peopl The best of Africa: it's people!!

    • From: schuindt
    • Description:

      This photo was taken when we drove from Abuja to Jos, Nigeria to visit projects by WaterAid.

      I loved Nigerians, they were friendly, funny and  treated me with all respect. Love the food, the sugar cane sold in the streets, the peanut....

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 282
  • Anti-speeding billboard Anti-speeding billboard

    • From: Martrese
    • Description:

      A funny, emasculating anti-speeding billboard on a highway north of Sydney, Australia.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 1818
  • No Gossiping Allowed No Gossiping Allowed

    • From: katiekins570
    • Description:

      Spotted in the Kolkata metro--"Sitting, Gossiping on Metro Staircase is Strictly."

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 327
    • Not yet rated
  • Hammer and sickle Hammer and sickle

    • From: katiekins570
    • Description:

      Hammer and sickle flag flying over a posh hotel in Vietnam...

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 524
    • Not yet rated
  • The Four Seasons The Four Seasons

    • From: katiekins570
    • Description:

      Clearly, the Four Seasons has laxer quality standards in Bangladesh.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 171
    • Not yet rated
Results 1 - 20 of 139

Terms of Service

Check Prices

mock rpx login link