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20 Search Results for "geysers"

  • Geysers Geysers

    • From: pbretheim
    • Description:
    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 42
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  • Steaming geysers - Yellowstone Steaming geysers - Yellowstone National Park

    • From: JackChason
    • Description:

      View of one of the Geyser basins in Yellowstone National Park.  Spent several days in the Park as part of our two week vacation that included Glacier National Park and Grand Teton National Park.  Even though it was mid September, it snowed while in Yellowstone.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 682
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  • geysers i n cloverdale,ca geysers i n cloverdale,ca

    • From: jeannep
    • Description:

      on the road to cloverdale, up to the geysers

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 202
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  • Gateway to The Geysers Gateway to The Geysers

    • From: xpando420
    • Description:

      looking east from a hill in cloverdale city limits, the gap made by big sulphur creek divides conifers froms oak onthe mountainside. this is where geysers road starts its journey to the largest geothermal power area in the world.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 354
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  • Geyser with Rainbow, Yellowsto Geyser with Rainbow, Yellowstone Natl Park

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      The geysers and boiling potholes of the Old Faithful park section of Yellowstone National Park in California are amazing.  Old Faithful is the superstar, due to its accurate and regular eruptions.  However, some of the other geysers, potholes and geothrermal features are even more spectacular.  A boardwalk safely meanders among the features for a mile or two, looping back to the Old Faithrul Lodge and parking lot.

      This geyser artistically painted a beautiful rainbow in the air as it erupted.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 929
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  • Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowsto Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone Natl Park

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      OLD FAITHFUL

      The Old Faithful geyser is the star of the show at Yellowstone National Park's geyser area.  It is most famous for being regularly on time every 60 minutes.  It is so accurate, you can set your watch by it. It is situated near the parking and lodge area.  Take the trail - most of the other features are actually more spectacular than Old Faithful!

      The geysers and boiling potholes of the Old Faithful park section of Yellowstone National Park in California are amazing.  Old Faithful is the superstar, due to its accurate and regular eruptions.  However, some of the other geysers, potholes and geothrermal features are even more spectacular.  A boardwalk safely meanders among the features for a mile or two, looping back to the Old Faithrul Lodge and parking lot.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 572
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  • Boiling Hot Spring, Yellowston Boiling Hot Spring, Yellowstone Natl Park

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      This boiling hot spring is in the Old Faithful section of Yellowstone National Park.  Each and every geothermal feature exhibits its own individual "personality".

      The geysers and boiling hot springs of the Old Faithful park section of Yellowstone National Park in California are amazing.  Old Faithful is the superstar, due to its accurate and regular eruptions.  However, some of the other geysers, potholes and geothrermal features are even more spectacular.  A boardwalk safely meanders among the features for a mile or two, looping back to the Old Faithrul Lodge and parking lot.

      I found this whole geyser area another proof that the power of the earth's natural resources make the entire human existence relatively insignificant.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 674
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  • Grand Geyser, Yellowstone Natl Grand Geyser, Yellowstone Natl Park

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      GRAND GEYSER

      Actually much more spectacular than Old Faithful is Grand Geyser located near the back of the loop boardwalk trail.  It is very unpredictable with eruptions anytime from 2.5 to 10 hours apart.  Many people wait for hours and hours.  The show that Grand Geyser performs is wilder and noisier than Old Faithful.

      The geysers and boiling potholes of the Old Faithful park section of Yellowstone National Park in California are amazing.  Old Faithful is the superstar, due to its accurate and regular eruptions.  However, some of the other geysers, potholes and geothrermal features are even more spectacular.  A boardwalk safely meanders among the features for a mile or two, looping back to the Old Faithrul Lodge and parking lot.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 459
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  • Hot Spring in Yellowstone Hot Spring in Yellowstone

    • From: bobcat812
    • Description:

      The geysers, mudpots, fumaroles and boiling hot springs of the Old Faithful park section of Yellowstone National Park in California are amazing.  Old Faithful is the superstar, due to its accurate and regular eruptions (every 60 minutes on the dot).  However, some of the other geysers, hot springs and geothrermal features are even more spectacular.  A boardwalk safely meanders among the features for a mile or two, looping back to the Old Faithrul Lodge and parking lot.

      This hot spring was breathtaking, mainly because of the vivid colors coming from minerals.  Iron makes the deep red you see here.

      Word of caution: Watch kids like a hawk.  Stepping off the boardwalk onto what appears to be solid ground could boil someone alive instantly.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 1346
  • Rainbow Waters Rainbow Waters

    • From: horbinsr
    • Description:

      Steamy air, bubbling mud pots and gushing geysers are all dramatic attractions of Yellowstone National Park, however, if you look real close at what those geysers and mud leave behind you'll find some very interesting natural textures.

      Grand Prismatic Spring is one of Yellowstone's largest hot spring, at 370 feet diameter and 121 feet deep. It overflows onto an area of bright-colored cyanobacteria and crystallized minerals.

      This collection of bacteria and minerals is what I was after. It forms 'stacked plates' which the water flows over. Part of the color comes from the bacteria and minerals and some comes from the reflection of the sky on the water, and some is a result of the refraction of light.

      With some special filters to control unwanted reflections, a cooperating sun and the right angle of view, a beautiful rainbow of colors can be seen across those plate.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 816
  • Geyser in Iceland Geyser in Iceland

    • From: SusanHalay
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 251
  • Cross country USA Part 2: Midw Cross country USA Part 2: Midwest

    • From: dni
    • Description:

      May 15, 2009. We woke up extra early to drive across some of the most boring landscapes in US. It will take us roughly 13 hours and 915 miles to get from Saint Louis to Badlands in South Dakota, giving time for lunch and pit stops. We got up, packed our luggages, ate breakfast, and left Saint Louis at 7:30AM. We arrived in Kansas City, MO (not to be confused with Kansas City, Kansas) at Arthur Bryant's for lunch.

      Not to be confused with Arthur W.M. Bryant, the British historian, Arthur Bryant's is a BBQ joint in downtown Kansas City. The place is a small hole in the wall restaurant with a long queue of people waiting to get their hands on some of the tastiest BBQ ever. The BBQ here is mostly beef briskets served open face on loads of soft white bread, as much as you'd like actually. The specialty is the burnt ends, which is what I had. It's burned to a nice crisp, with a bit of ash flavor still lingering on the meat. It was finger licking good.

      At halfway point, we stopped in Omaha, NE for a quick cup of joe at the local Starbucks. After the pick me up, the weather started to turn on us. And what a great opportunity for Raymond to become sleepy (yes, after the coffee) and wanted me to drive a little. For the next 2 hours, the weather got really nasty, it rained so hard that I couldn't see 2 feet ahead of me, then it hailed, and it was very intense driving. Soon after the storm rolled by, the sun came out and revealed a bright blue sky. The landscape was just as Raymond had described, lots and lots and lots and lots of small rolling hills and cows for the next 5 hours.

      By the time we reached the Badlands National Park, it was close to 8PM (after we gained one hour heading west), and the sun was going down fast. I was itching to get out of the car, only to find my flip-flop and long sleeve sweater to be slightly -- wait, scratch that out -- to be very inadequate. The weather in South Dakota was bitter, cold, dry, and extremely windy, even in May. I quickly unpacked my camera and tripod, ran out towards the pretty yellow and green grassland to snap a few pictures. "Ouch!" Yes, I stepped on a cactus.


      Badlands was once a hunting ground for the Native Americans. It is here where they hunted bisons, scanned for their enemies and wandering herds. It is 244,000 acres of eroded land blended with rich fossil beds in an once fresh water valley. The once stream banks are now the colorfully carved rocks in the background. It is also the home to bisons, bighorn sheep, black-footed ferrets, swift fox, prairie dogs, and CACTUS. After my cactus injury, the arch of my foot swelled up to the size of a lemon. Raymond had to carry me back to the car. Note to self: Next time -- wear shoes.

      We spent better half of the next day exploring Custer State Park. We drove around the park circle looking out for buffalos, elks, mule deer, pronghorns, and bighorn sheep. And finally we pondered upon a big herd of buffalos grazing, with baby buffalos trailing after their mother. I was a bit disappointed that I did not own a mac daddy zoom lens for my camera, so I was only able to take pictures from a distance. For the first time in my life, I saw a wild herd of buffalos. And for the first time in my life, I ate a buffalo burger at a cook out sponsored by the park. It was a bit wrong, I admit.

      By noon, I was ready to go for a hike, and we decided on the Lover's Leap. As we got out of the car at the trail head, there was a buffalo about 10 feet away from me, across the stream, grazing alone. I took the golden opportunity to take a quick picture. Please note: It is very dangerous to observe a buffalo from a short distance, do not try this at home.


      For dinner, we decided to go to the Corn Exchange in downtown Rapid City, which was a very lovely little town and restaurant. We were only able to snatch a reservation at 9PM, and the restaurant was sold out of a lot of the things I had wanted. The experience was still very pleasant, I settled on a Caesar salad with anchovies while Raymond had a Filet Mignon with sun-dried tomato butter. And we finished the night with a very creamy and slightly sweet creme brulee.

      We decided to sleep in the next morning, and finally got out of bed at 7:30AM (which is like 9:30AM on the east coast). Our agenda today was to drive 510 miles/8 hours to Yellowstone, horizontally across the state of Wyoming. For about 6 hours on the road, there was nothing. No rolling hills, no cows, nothing, until finally the sky opened and there it was -- the snow capped Rockies.

      We finally reached our destination at 8PM and checked into Yellowstone Lake Hotel. The hotel needed a restoration BAD. It looked as if it was still living in the glamor of the 1960s, which was probably when it was last renovated. There was a lounge/foyer, where guests could sit, enjoy the view of the lake (frozen lake in May), and have an overpriced cocktail. Our room was tiny and old, but the bathroom was clean.

      Raymond broke into the beer that he received as a gift from the wedding, and we went straight to bed. In the middle of the night, Raymond jumped out of bed, turned on the light, and he was throwing a towel up and down on top of me and the covers. I was confused, pulled the covers over me, and went back to sleep. The next morning, he told me there was a mouse running on top of me and the covers last night. THAT caused me insomnia the following night.

      By now, you'd think I'd be used to the cold north west, but I wasn't. It's difficult to look outside and see 10 feet of snow piled up on the side of the road in May. I was dressed in layers of tank top, long sleeve t-shirt, sweater, coat, and gloves. We headed outside to see Old Faithful this morning. We waited roughly 10 minutes around the geyser, and then it started to produce a ton of steam, and then water spouted for about 3 minutes.


      A geyser is basically a hot spring that is usually located near volcanic areas, and the name derives from the Icelandic verb, to gush, gjósa. Geysers are co-located with a pool of water, such as mudpools or fumaroles. Where the underground water circulation system is heated by the magma from the volcanic area, and is then pushed up through the geyser and thus erupts. Then the cycle continues. And Yellow Stone has almost half of all the geysers in the world.

      For the rest of the day, we drove around the park loop, checked out Roosevelt Tower, crossed countless waterfalls, and did a bit of hiking in 6 feet of snow. Many of the hiking paths were still closed, and would not open for another 2 weeks or so. There were an abundance of geysers, and the fumes were toxicating and smelly from the sulfur. Then finally we reached Mammoth Springs! I've been looking forward to the Springs; however, I was slightly disappointed when I found out that many of the springs have ceased to flow for a few years now. I suppose the springs flow and die out and comes back every few decade or so. I was just unlucky. The Canary Spring still flowed in abundance, and has a hue of yellow/orange in the bed of the spring that is caused by a specific kind of algae that thrives in the hot temperature.


      We returned to the hotel for dinner early in the evening. I have already been forewarned regarding the food at the hotel by TripAdvisor.com, so I was careful not to raise my expectation too high. I decided to go with a seared duck breast salad for $14, with dressing on the side incase they drench my salad. To my surprised, the duck salad was not half bad. The duck breast was generously sized on a big plate of fresh greens, and not over cooked -- just slightly pink in the middle and very juicy. Not bad for a tourist trap.


      May 19th, and we were on our way to the Grand Tetons. The drive from Yellow Stone to Grand Tetons was lovely with the Tetons covered in snow. We decided on an easy hike around lake Jenny that is a 6-7 miles loop. However, I did not anticipating on hiking in the snow, so I had to back track to the car to put on a pair of hiking boots. The hike would have been a pretty easy one had there not been any snow. With the snow, the trails are sometime ambiguous and we got lost, and half of my body fell through the snow drift into a stream and placed a deep cut on my leg. However, the hike was well worth it, along the way we saw a few black marmots (much like a beaver but without a flat tail and doesn't build dams), chipmunks, and a baby elk.

      I was exhausted when we finally checked into our motel in Jackson Hole, and slept like a log for over 8 hours. The next day we were on our way to aunt Janet's in Erie, CO. I started my day off with a 6 mile run, felt great about myself before we stuffed ourselves back into the car for another 8 hour drive. By now, I was getting a bit sick of ridding in the car and was hoping therun in the morning would give me a bit of a jump start, but it wore off in about 30 minutes.

      The weather has been pretty good all along in the trip, so by the time we reached Erie, it has become cloudy and rainy. We spent the day walking around the sleepy college town of Boulder (most of the kids would have gone home by end of May), visiting the college campus, and then the outdoor shopping district -- Pearl Street Mall. Since Estee Park was not yet open, we went on a short hike up Flat Iron Mountain, called Royal Arch. The last 0.7 mile of the hike ascends you to the top of the mountain where you could view the entire city from atop the clouds. Quite an invigorating view!

      We left aunt Janet's on May 22nd, for another 7 hour car ride to Durango, CO. The highlight of the day was when we passed through the town of South Park, CO, while I watched "He's Not That Into You" in the car. The next day we fulfilled one of Raymond's childhood dreams. We rode on the steam train from Durango to Silverton, CO. The train ride up the mountain was spectacular, waterfalls left and right, streams crossing underneath us while we crossed over wooden bridges, mountains on both sides of us so close that I could easily reach out and touch them. After about 2 hours of the train ride, I was no longer visually stimulated, and there was still 1.5 hours left on the ride up and then another 3.5 hours of train ride back down the mountain. Oh boy.


      The name steam train was a bit misleading, because the engine was actually run by coal. And the sot from the coal gets picked up by the steam and was then released into the air, and eventually lands on my face as we strolled slowly up the mountain. This was NOT very environmentally friendly. The train also moves very slowly at about 5-15 miles an hour, we noticed that some people actually got to the top of the mountain in Silverton faster by bicycle.

      The town, Silverton, was formerly a silver mining town with a small population of 500. Today, the town is mostly a small tourist trap, with small bar/restaurants/saloon, such as Shady Lady in a former brothel, few shops for souvenirs, and such. The train allows the tourist to roam around town for almost 2 hours, and that would be plenty to see the town and catch a bite to eat. Then another 3.5 hours back to Durango. Raymond came to Durango almost 15 years ago, his parents refused to take a trip to Silverton on the train, I can see why.

      For dinner, we went to the famous local eatery called Red Snapper in down town Durango. I decided on the local almond crusted trout, since I see a lot of trout finishing in the CO area. However, I was disappointed by the dish, the trout was over cooked, the almond was overwhelming, breading was too thick, fish skin was not roasted with a flavorful crisp, and the whole dish was just quite bland. Raymond decided that we should contribute the unpleasant dinner experience to the high altitude. It apparently is very hard to cook in high altitude, but Raymond also contributes the fact that he misheard me to that he can't remember any things he did wrong on this trip to the affect of altitude. SURE... honey!

       

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
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  • Steam Vent Steam Vent

    • From: morherz
    • Description:

      This was taken in Yellowstone National Park at Geyser Basin.  There were so many steam vents and geysers that it was hard to know where to look first.  I hiked on every foot of every trail at Geyser Basin.  There were not many people there, so I was able to enjoy the show with out the crowds.  This was in September.  Taken with  Nikon N90S, Nikor 24 - 85mm lens and KOdak Ultra 400 film.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 369
  • Old Faithful Old Faithful

    • From: jramseya2d
    • Description:

      Our trip to Yellowstone N.P.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 240
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  • OLD FAITHFUL, YELLOWSTONE NATI OLD FAITHFUL, YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK

    • From: dallaservin
    • Description:
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 321
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  • Surreal Yellowstone Surreal Yellowstone

    • From: cshoadley
    • Description:

      In our "Do the National Parks" trip, we visited Yellowstone in late September. It snowed the day we left. This great looking tree was standing in the middle of one of the hot springs. It looked like it was trying to grow in some alien environment!

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 445
  • Nine Days With My Brother Nine Days With My Brother

    • From: willbros
    • Description:

      We left Rochester, New York early in the morning of May 26, 2008, and crossed the San Francisco Bay Bridge eight days later.  Here are a few highlights of the trip that encompassed 3300 miles, four time zones, 106 Canadian flags, two two-pound cheeseburgers, and a seemingly infinite amount of bison scat.  While reading this, keep in mind that we drove a very small Ford Escort ZX2, slept in a tent, and have an average height of 6'5".

      NEW YORK

      We got out of the Empire State as quickly as possible - save for a last minute stop at Aldi's to buy rations and a saucepan.

      ONTARIO

      So technically we didn't stay in the US.  We bypassed the well-known roadside sights of Pennsylvania and Ohio in favor crossing the border into our northern neighbor, Canada.  When we were planning this trip, Reid and I had asked friends and family members for "challenges", a directive that was kept secret until the day of the trip it was intended for.  The first challenge came from our mother: count the number of Canadian flags we saw.  Surprisingly, in just 192 miles, we spotted 106 maple leaf monstrosities.

      MICHIGAN

      Despite getting a little closer to Detroit than our directions suggested, we made it across the Great Lakes State by the end of the first day.  This was the only night of the trip we didn't stay in a tent, as we visited my fiancé and her family.  Coincidentally, this was our best meal of the trip.

      INDIANA

      Driving through the Northwest corner of the state didn't take long, and most people were still asleep, since this breakaway region is on Central Time.

      ILLINOIS

      Had we known that Barack Obama's Hyde Park neighborhood is now permanently cordoned off by police, we would have stopped to see the future president's house.  Instead, the only stop we made was at a Rockford Verizon store to get Reid a new phone.  This seems frivolous, but in fact was imperative to keeping our family and fans abreast of our travels.  We updated a Google group of our trip daily via text.

      WISCONSIN

      Here we detoured off the interstate to find a family-owned creamery in the small town of Shullsburg.  Reid called ahead and arranged for a personal tour of the cheese-making facilities. This was a great exhibit of the Midwestern hospitality we encountered.  Upon recommendation of the third-generation cheese maker, we visited Gravity Hill in Shullsburg.  According to legend, if you stop your car at the base of this hill and let it roll backwards, you will feel the sensation of being pulled uphill.  Even with positive-reinforcement, Reid and I could not find a way to confuse the laws of physics.

      MINNESOTA

      We spent the second night camping at a KOA in Rochester (fun fact: this city is named after Rochester, NY).  To our surprise, this site had wireless internet.  This would be the most luxurious campsite of the week.  On day three, we walked around downtown Rochester and saw the shining buildings of the Mayo Clinic.  After this, all we saw were miles of farmland, dotted with large wind turbines.  Being engineers, curiosity got the best of my brother and me, so we exited I-90 at Beaver Creek, and did some exploring.  We followed a quiet dirt road to a cornfield, where we drove up to the base of one of these energy-producing giants.  Taking this trip at the beginning of the summer that will be remembered for its record-breaking oil prices, it was good to see that alternative energy investments were already underway.  The windmill wasn't the only "green" giant we met, however.  In Blue Earth, Minnesota, we saw a sixty-foot statue of the Jolly Green Giant, smiling as happily as ever.

      SOUTH DAKOTA

      Driving through this large state that is split by the Missouri River gave me lots of memories.  One that stands out is a challenge that Reid and I bestowed upon ourselves.  We stopped for gas and lunch at a restaurant that featured a two pound hamburger.  The waitress told us that if we finished the burger - which weighed four pounds when cheese, lettuce, and pickles came into play - within an hour, we'd get our pictures on the wall.  With fifteen minutes remaining, we had both finished more than 75% of the meal and hit a wall.  We didn't eat dinner that day or breakfast the next morning.  Visiting the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota, we learned that the local high school basketball team (whose mascot is named Cornelius) plays here.  This unique structure didn't seem too far out of place in a state whose highway vistas include rusted fire engines, giant dinosaurs, and billboards touting attractions some three hundred miles away.  We did eventually make it to Wall Drug Store, which I assumed to be the world's largest gift shop.  We spent two nights camping in Badlands National Park.  Highlights of this park were the bighorn sheep we tracked, the towering buttes we saw, and the friendly people we met.  We talked to many other folks who were also driving across the country (and one who was bicycling!).  One young couple was driving in the opposite direction as us, and alerted us of the blizzard that forced them to leave Yellowstone early.  After Badlands, Reid and I stopped in Rapid City for another meal.  A friend's challenge was meet the mayor of a Midwestern town - a task we had given up on after the Corn Palace mayor's office failed to return our calls.  Surprisingly, as we were eating lunch, a candidate for United States Senate walked up to our table neighbors and filmed them for a commercial.  We didn't speak with Sam Kephart, but decided that just seeing him trumped meeting a mayor.  After seeing Gutzon Borglum's most famous sculpture, Mount Rushmore, Reid and I spent that night in the Black Hills National Forest.  Park rangers allow visitors to camp anywhere in the forest, which allowed for some great off-trail exploring.

      WYOMING

      At the Powder River Pass (elevation 9666 ft.), we saw snow for the first time (at least in June).  This is almost twice as high as any mountain in New York.  The highlight of Wyoming was clearly Yellowstone, though, where we camped for two nights.  The ice-covered lakes, lodge pole pine trees, canyons and waterfalls provided breathtaking views all around the park.  Even more breathtaking, however, was the masses of bison that weren't scared to come within feet of our car.  Yellowstone, which hosts more than 3 million human visitors every year, is home to many other species (we saw elk, a heron, and a bear), but the buffalo stand out due to their sheer size.  It's hard not to ignore an animal whose scat is larger than both my feet.  The park has some great ranger stations, where we learned about bison population growth and the giant volcanic caldera that runs under much of the park.  This is responsible for the awe-inspiring geysers and hot springs that are prevalent in the park.  I'd definitely like to spend more time in Yellowstone in the future.  Hopefully next time the drive won't be so long, though.

      MONTANA

      We spent even less time in Montana than we did in Indiana, but at least now I can say I've been to the Treasure State.

      IDAHO

      After finding out about the gigantic burgers we had eaten in South Dakota, our aunt challenged us to do push-ups and sit-ups every time we filled up the gas tank.  Driving a small, fuel-efficient car was a mixed blessing - we got good mileage, but had to fill up often since the tank is small.  This led to lots of dirty palms in gas stations.

      NEVADA

      Seeing vast stretches of emptiness in Nevada, it's not hard to imagine why the Department of Energy has proposed a permanent nuclear waste storage facility in Yucca Mountain, 80 miles from Las Vegas.  We spent the night camping in the back of an RV park in Elko, a small town that featured at least three casinos.  The next day, we were fortunate enough to eat lunch at the Reno home of family friends we had known overseas.  It reminded us that no matter how far you drive, there's always someone you know when you get there.

      CALIFORNIA

      Crossing the border into our last state gave us the opportunity to see Lake Tahoe, the largest alpine lake in North America.  From there, it was a bittersweet last day's drive to San Francisco.  Reid and I talked about all the great memories we would have from this epic journey.  We also made sure to text the Google group and thank them for their challenges along the way.  That evening, we arrived on the doorstep of our uncle's house, having completed a trip of a lifetime.  Now bound to engineering jobs, neither of us foresees nine consecutive days of vacation in the near future, let alone an opportunity to drive across the country.

      There were so many great sights along the road that I didn't have room to mention here.  Now I can say I've been to a little more of my own country - mission accomplished.  But even more importantly, I spent nine days with my brother.

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
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  • Geysers in Yellowstone Lake Geysers in Yellowstone Lake

    • From: samolo
    • Description:
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 867
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  • Great American Road Trip Part Great American Road Trip Part II {Day 5-9)

    • From: samolo
    • Description:

      Our family (2 parents, 2 children, 1 brother) decided to take a trip to see America (or at least part of it) on a 14 day road trip.

      DAY FIVE

      JUNE 23, 2008

      Mt. RushmoreToday started off rainy. At first I was worried that we wouldn’t be able to go to Mt. Rushmore, but by 7:00 AM the rain had given away to a beautiful sunny day. We arrived at Mt. Rushmore around 8:15 and were pleased that the park was not crowded. We were able to take pictures with relatively few people in the background. After posing for the requisite pictures with the monument in the background we begin to explore the park. Once again the girls completed a Jr. Ranger packet as we went through the exhibits and walked around. Robert worked with Adera on and I helped Imani. Albert went off by himself to take a closer look at the information on the exhibits. Once we finished looking at the museum we decided there was no need to go on the Presidential Trial or head to the sculptor’s studio. Instead we watched a movie about the wild life at Mt. Rushmore. After about 2 hours we were finished and took the girls to get their Jr. Ranger patch. Adera kept saying how much she wanted to be a real Jr. Ranger. As we were walking out of the park we all agreed that we were happy we came early so we didn’t have to deal with the crowds that were gathering as we left.

       Next we settled in for the 5 hour drive to Billings, MT. Originally we planned to stop at Little Big Horn, but nixed the idea when our Mt. Rushmore plans changed. Along the way to our hotel we enjoyed the beautiful scenery.

       

      HIGHLIGHTS

      AND LOWLIGHTS

      Mt. RushmoreThe day was certainly filled with both highlights and lowlights. First, the highlights. We all agreed that Mt. Rushmore was magnificent, and a wonderful example of craftsmanship and dedication. We also loved how close you could get the mountain. Another part of Mt. Rushmore we really enjoyed was the museum. The exhibits were very informative and there were even tools used to make the craving on display. Finally, we got to see mountain goats. Apparently mountain goats and big horn sheep roam the grounds along Mt. Rushmore. The other highpoint of the day was eating at HuHot Mongolian grill. You make your own Mongolian combination and they cook the food on a hug 10’ wok. Finally, playing in the hotel pool was tops on their list of the fun things we did today. The pool is a designed like a water playland. They loved sliding down the slide, crossing the suspension bridge, and swimming around.

      Unfortunately, there were also things that happened today that were horrible. The first was that I dropped my camera in the parking lot at Mt. Rushmore. Now if I leave it on for more than a minute a get a warning signal that says it is overheating and to turn it off for a while. I am praying that it makes it through the trip. The other lowpoints were that the girls and I had had pressure headaches and I slammed Imani’s hand in the door. However, both of these were cured with medication and a little ice.

       

      DAY SIX

      JUNE 24, 2008

      After a quick breakfast at the hotel we were ready to go to our next destination, Bozeman Montana. We were going to see the Museum of the Rockies. Considering the amount of driving we have done in the last couple of days today felt short, only 2 hours to Bozeman. Along the way we were able to see the beautiful Rocky Mountains in the distance. As we drove closer to Bozeman we were able to see even more detail on them. I envied the people who had the Rockies as their backyard scenery.

      Minerva TerraceWhen we got to the museum we walked through the exhibits. Some of them were interesting, but some of them weren’t. We really enjoyed the dinosaur, car, Native American, and Living History Museum. However, the planetarium was really boring (Imani was the only one who enjoyed it). We also found it weird that you weren’t allowed to take pictures in some of the exhibits. After about 2 ½ hours we left to go to Yellowstone. We decided to back track a little so that we could enter through the north entrance. Driving this way allowed us to see the Minerva Terrance. We were able to spend about 2 ½ hours in the park and saw buffaloes, a grizzly bear, elk, and two bald eagles. Then we headed to our cabin. The cabin was so nice, even better than the one in Custer. It is roomy and had lots of upgrades. Imani said she never wanted to leave since it felt more like a house.

       

      HIGHLIGHTS

      AND LOWLIGHTS

      Yellowstone BisonWe really enjoyed Yellowstone. Today we were even able to see some of the geysers. We walked along the boardwalk of the Minerva Terrances. They looked like solid blocks of ice. During our drive we pulled over to look at closer look at a geyser that  smelled like rotten eggs, but we didn’t mind. We were also pleased with how many animals we saw on our first day. We saw at least 25 buffalos but since we saw so many in Custer we didn’t pull over as often. We even saw a grizzly bear in the distance but there was no where to pull over to take a picture.

      The other thing we all were really pleased with is the cabin. It is large and very clean. The owners Ken and Dorit are really nice and take a lot of pride in the property. They both took about 30 minutes to tell us about the area and the cabin.

      Yes, I was told by Dorit over the phone how expensive everything was but I didn’t think things would cost this much. For example a gallon of milk is $6.50. Even the combos at McDonald’s are twice as much $7.95. We decided to buy groceries and only eat out a couple of times to help keep the food cost down, since a family dinner at one of the restaurants can easily cost $60. We also happen to come at the height of mosquito season. However, we are missing most of the crowds so it is all good.

       

      DAY SEVEN

      JUNE 25, 2008

      Today we all woke up refreshed. We started off with breakfast. We had huckleberry pancakes from a mix I picked up in Bozeman. They were really good and the package came with huckleberry syrup. After breakfast we hung out for a little while and then headed to Yellowstone around 10:30. We were able to spend a full day in the park and didn’t return to the cabin until 6:30.

       

      Colorful YellowstoneWe spent today traveling around part of the Lower Loop in the Geyser Basin. We were able to see so many geysers and other geothermal features. Our first stop was the Fountain Mud Pots. The area was covered in boiling mud that splattered up. It was really weird. Next we saw a lot of geothermal pools. I was really surprised by the amount of colorful geothermal pools there were; before visiting Yellowstone I thought the Morning Glory pool was the only colorful water feature. However, as we explored and walked around we saw at least 30 different pools. The information around the pools stated the different colors were caused by various bacteria. The water to the pools looked so inviting and if you didn’t know better you would want to take a dip in the water. Next, we went to see Old Faithful erupt. We got there a little early and had to wait about 20 minutes. Once it erupted it was spectacular. It shot really high into the air and lasted about 1 minute. Our final stop was to see a portion of Yellowstone Lake. At the lake we were able to talk to a ranger and find out about the geysers in the lake as well as some of the wildlife. This was a perfect day in Yellowstone.

       

      HIGHLIGHTS

      AND LOWLIGHTS

      Snow in YellowstoneToday was another day full of highlights. First, my camera is still working (as long as I turn it off for a little while after taking about 7 pictures). The drive through Yellowstone was amazing and beautiful. We went through several different habitats and saw even more animals. Adera and Robert loved seeing a fox/coyote (we are not sure which one) chasing a moose.  We all laughed when someone tried to go around a bison and the bison became upset and ran towards its car like it was going to hit it. We laughed for about 10 minutes at how silly the person in the car was and we joked about how it would have served him right if the bison had butted his car. We also drove up in the mountains and saw lots of snow that had yet to melt. When we stopped for our picnic lunch Albert and the girls even made snowballs. Imani, Albert, and I also really loved seeing all of the geothermal features. They were AMAZING! I enjoyed seeing these more than the geysers. However, after a few hours Adera said she had seen enough geysers. We all agreed and decided we would do the rest of the loop another day.

       Once we were back at the cabin we had a great grilled dinner (hamburgers, hotdogs, potato salad, and sweet tea. It was nice to relax at the cabin rather than having to get back in the car and go somewhere else to eat. After dinner we went out to the front deck and roasted s’mores. Since there wasn’t a fire ring we had to use the bar-b-q grill. The girls didn’t really like s’mores, but we still had a nice time talking and recapping all of the fun and interesting things we saw and did today.

       

      DAY EIGHT

      JUNE 26, 2008

      _Yellowstone CanyonWe explored more of Yellowstone again today. This time we focused on the Canyon Area. Our goal was to go to the Lamar Valley to see wildlife, go to the Tower at Roosevelt and go on a stagecoach ride, and explore the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone. The day didn’t exactly turn out as we planned. The road to see the Grand Canyon portion of Yellowstone was closed so we had to take another route. We were trying to follow the map but the closed off road wasn’t shown and we ended up doing our sites in a different order and somehow we ended up at the Tower at Roosevelt first instead of last. That would have been fine, since we were going there anyways but there were no stagecoach rides for the next two hours. Instead we decided to continue of the portion of the road and explore Lamar Valley. We were able to see a variety of wildlife on our drive. We saw a black bear, a grizzly bear, elk, a coyote, a big horn sheep, and trumpet swans. Yellowstone SnowOn the way to our trying to find our way we also ended up driving high into the mountains and discovered that the snow had not melted. It was so high in some places-almost 5 feet! Finally, after driving all the way up to one point and back down to the visitors’ center (about 40 miles) we found the Grand Canyon. It was only about 5 miles from the visitor center. The view was breath taking. However, after about 10 minutes it started to rain and we headed back to the car. That is when I discovered that my camera wouldn’t take anymore pictures and had officially died on me!

       

      HIGHLIGHTS

      AND LOWLIGHTS

      There were distinct highs and lows today. My camera dying was the lowest of them all. I love my camera and bought it specifically to go on this trip. It is going to be hard downgrading to Imani’s point and shot camera for the rest of the trip, but I am sure somehow I think I will survive. I am glad that I bought accident insurance on the camera so that I can have it repaired when I return home. Robert, Albert, and I started joking that it is weird that we have had several electronics break on the trip. First the DVD player stopped working somewhere in Kansas City (we bought a replacement one in Sioux Falls). Then the video camera died while we were in Custer. Finally, Albert’s MP3 player stopped working today when he dropped it in the parking lot of at the cabin. It is almost as if a God is telling us to get back to nature and let go of our many electronic devices.

      The other low point came when I called to confirm my reservation for Thermopolis. Somehow they lost the reservation. After a lengthy conversation I decided to just book us at another hotel.

      However, not all was bad. My favorite part of today was seeing the Grand Canyon. I gasped when I caught sight of it. Everyone else was loved seeing all of the animals (especially the bears since they are rarely seen) and playing in the snow. It was like we all got a special treat that none of us were expecting.

       

      DAY NINE

      JUNE 27, 2008

      Geysers in Yellowstone LakeToday was our last day at Yellowstone. This time we explored the other half of the lower loop with a focus on Yellowstone Lake. In route to the lake we stopped at the Mud Volcano. While walking up the trail to the Mud Volcanoes you are able to see the Yellowstone River a little better. It was difficult not to just stand there and keep staring at the lake. After the Mud Volcanoes we headed over to the Bay Bridge Marina to go on a boat tour of Yellowstone Lake. We arrived a little early and had time to walk around a little to view the lake. The girls were a little nervous about going on the boat. However, once we started Imani relaxed and really enjoyed the tour. Adera never did relax and put her head down on Imani’s lap. The next thing I knew she had fallen asleep and didn’t wake up until we docked again.

      After the cruise we had a picnic lunch and talked about our day. We laughed when we recounted the story that another visitor told us about someone getting  too close to a bison and getting knocked over and walked on. People just don’t learn and follow the rules. Later we stopped and bought souvenirs. Adera wanted a coon skin cap and a ranger costume (they didn’t have ranger costumes) and Imani wanted a crystal necklace and a t-shirt. Finally, we headed back to the cabin and enjoyed a nice meal. The girls finished their evening by playing in the backyard. Staying at the cabin was a definite treat. The girls were disappointed when we told them this would be our last night.

       

      HIGHLIGHTS

      AND LOWLIGHTS

      Yellowstone LakeWhen I asked everyone what they enjoyed most about the day the answers varied, but were also the same. We all loved the drive through the park. Everyone except Adera really liked the boat ride on Yellowstone Lake. During our tour we were able to go almost to the middle of the lake. At one point the Captain stopped the boat and we were even able to see one of the Grand Teton Mountains. It was so peaceful and it was rewarding to see that for as far as you could see there weren’t any roads, houses, or any other man-made objects. In addition to the boat ride I was also really pleased when Imani and Adera earned their Jr. Ranger patch. The girls really enjoy and look forward to earning each pin/patch they earn. Adera even wants to be a Jr. Ranger for Halloween.  Albert, Robert, and I still like the horrible things that happen to stupid people. We would laugh at signs that showed someone getting burned by walking on geyser or gored, maimed, or eaten by approaching an animal; thinking that surely no one is that dumb. However, in just 3 ½ days there were two instances of people doing silly things. In a weird way just for our amusement; thank you stupid people.

      On a more sensitive side the girls liked looking at the animals. We saw a fox that Adera really enjoyed. Imani also liked the bird who kept us company during our picnic. Regardless we all had a wonderful time and loved our time in Yellowstone.

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