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  • Jewish Museums of North Americ Jewish Museums of North America

    • From: laurierappeport
    • Description:

       

      The Jewish population of the United States stands at barely 3% of America's total residents but the community has been an intergral part of the American landscape since Colonial times. Throughout the country museums, small and large, exist which attest to the unique role that Jews see for themselves in America and their commitment to their heritage.

      Wherever I travel I try to search out Jewish museums. Every region gives its own flavor to the American Jewish experience and by observing them I enjoy the opportunity to see the American Jewish world in all is diversity.

      Jewish Museum of Oregon

      In the mid-1800s the German Jewish immigration to American began to gain momentum. Most of these immigrants settled along the East Coast but some adventurous pioneers moved westward. In 1849  two German Jewish immigrants traveled to Oregon and settled in the frontier town of Portland. By 1853 enough additional Jewish men had arrived in the town to create the need for a boardinghouse for Jewish bachelors and  the Jewish community continued to expand.

       

      Today Portland has a vibrant Jewish community. The Jewish Museum of Oregon traces the Jewish presence in the northeast with a wide range of exhibits that help you appreciate the sacrifices that the early Jewish settlers made to come and live in the Pacific Northwest. The museum houses a large archive that contains documents, photos and artifacts that document the Jewish immigration and settlement in the region. You can also listen to some of the old-timers whose memories are recorded via the museum's  oral history program.  

       

      Modern Portland Jewish history is on display via temporary exhibits which display Judaica and elements of Jewish culture and tradition. These exhibits are not necessarily unique to Oregon, but their inclusion in the museum ensures that the exhibits meet the needs of present-day visitors for Jewish information. Films, concerts and lectures are scheduled throughout the year -- the website provides information about these events.

       

       

      Jewish Museum of Charleston

      It may seem incongruous to have a full-blown, high quality Jewish museum in a city with a miniscule Jewish population but 200 years ago there were more Jews in Charleston than in almost any other American colony. Charleston is the historical home of one of North America's first Jewish communities. The Charter of South Carolina, written in 1669, granted liberty of conscience to all residents, specifically noting "Jews, heathens, and dissenters." Spanish, Portuguese and Dutch Jews saw Charleston as a haven where they could  live freely as Jews. Charleston was a center of Jewish life until well into the 20th century and a congregation still remains.

       

      The Jewish Museum of Charleston displays a wide range of exhibits that explore Jewish culture, showing how Jews celebrated and commemorated holidays and rituals hundreds of years ago till today. The museum's permanent exhibition -- Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey examines the Jewish experience of the last 4000 years as it is perceived through various art forms. The display area presents a diverse collection of archaeological objects, ceremonial implements, photographs, videos and interactive media that offers an overview of the American Jewish experience.

       

      The museum is located in the Kahal Kadosh synagogue. Kahal Kadosh was built in 1749 to serve the Sephardic (Spanish and Portuguese) Jews. It became one of America's first Reform Temples when the changing demographics of the Charleston Jewish community created a need for change in the mid 1800s.  The Museum traces the history of this evolution as well as of the Reform reinterpretation of Jewish traditions, the interaction of Jewish community of Charleston with other cultures and the impact that these historical events have had on American Jewish life.

       

      Breman Jewish Heritage Museum

      There are Holocaust Museums all over the world but the Breman Jewish Heritage Museum, located in Atlanta Georgia, tells the story of the Holocaust by exploring the lives of over 400 survivors who made their way to Georgia and Alabama after the war.

       

      Using documents, photos and biographical details of the survivors the museum demonstrates the progression of the Holocaust years, starting with the persecutions and moving on to the ghettos, the concentration camps and, for very few, final freedom.

       

      Holocaust survivors that made their way to the southern United States have become successful and valued members of their communities. These people gave their time, money and memories to  the museum to contribute to Holocaust education in their community. Probably the most moving part of the museum involved the survivors' stories which personalized the exhibit in a way that photos and documents can never achieve. The Breman museum adds a great deal to the public's knowledge and understanding of the Holocaust.

        

      Milken Archives of Jewish Music

      The Los Angeles-based Milken Archives of Jewish Music was created by the Milken Foundation as a resource through which the history and the evolution of American Jewry can be traced by examining Jewish American liturgy and music. Beginning with data that documents the 17th century Sephardic Jews who arrived from Brazil, the Archive documents the unique songs and chants that are associated with American Jewish history.

       

      The first Jews in America were of Spanish and Portuguese origin. After they escaped the Inquisition they moved to Holland and from Holland they joined the expeditions to the New World. When Portugal conquered Brazil from Holland and brought the Inquisition to South America the Jews fled northward to the new American colonies. They brought their Iberian traditions and Sephardic culture with them and early American Jewish worship was characterized by Sephardic melodies and liturgy.

       

      German Jews began to immigrate to America in the mid-1800s. Some synagogues incorporated the new German customs, including those of the German-based Reform denomination, into their services. By the late 1800s a great immigration that would eventually encompass over 2 million Eastern European Jews was underway -- this wave laid the groundwork for an American Jewish community that, until today, is mostly Ashkanazic. The Milken Archives has created recordings that trace each of these groups through their prayers, especially Ashkanazi cantorial music. As a researcher who is interested in American Jewish history, I found numerous helpful resources and materials available at the Archives. The Archives also offer these resources online.

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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  • Greatest Small Town in America Greatest Small Town in America -- Fort Scott Kansas

    • From: laurierappeport
    • Description:
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      When I saw Budget Travel's vote for favorite small town of America, I immediately thought of my 2011 visit to Fort Scott Kansas. Our family was making a cross-country trek from Michigan to California and we happened to stop in Fort Scott for a few days to relax and recharge for the drive ahead. We ended up staying for three days and enjoyed every minutes. One of the most highly recommended small towns in America.
      There are about 8000 residents in Fort Scott but the town played an important part of the history of setting the Western United States. There are several interesting sites in and near Fort Scott including venues of historical, cultural and environmental interest. After our visit, we felt as though we'd seen some real Americana.  
      Fort Scott Fort and the National Cemetery
      Fort Scott played an important role in the settlement of the West. It was built in 1842 as an outpost for troops who enforced the uneasy peace between the settlers and the Osage Indians. Westbound travelers could fill up on provisions at the fort before they set out on their journey along the Santa Fe Trail. As the Civil War loomed the troops tried to separate the pro-slave and anti-slave activists in the newly-formed state of Kansas. When the war did break out Fort Scott became a Quartermaster's Supply Deposit, as well as the training base of the First Kansas Colored Infantry -- a unit that took part in multiple battles and suffered more casualties than any other Kansas regiment. The Fort Scott National Historic Site, operated by the National Parks Service, offers a view into the frontier days including the original fort's buildings. Guided tours are offered twice daily (11:00a.m. and 13:00pm.) during the summer months by costumed guides who provide a full explanation of the type of life the early soldiers and residents of Fort Scott experienced.  The fort is located south of I54 on Market Street near the city center. (620) 223-0310  
      Abraham Lincoln inaugurated the Fort Scott National Cemetery as a military cemetery in 1865 when it was already serving as the final resting place of hundreds of Union and Confederate soldiers as well as for troops that had been killed during the pre-Civil War period. After its establishment as a National Cemetery the remains of other soldiers who had been buried throughout Kansas and Missouri were brought to the Fort Scott cemetery for reinternment. These included black Union soldiers of the First Colored Infantry. In the northeast corner of the cemetery visitors can see memorial markers which honor soldiers whose remains were not recovered or identified including WWII flight crews.
      Gordon Parks Museum
      Gordon Parks was born and raised in Fort Scott. Many people remember him as the director of the movie "Shaft" but before his movie career he was a recognized photographer whose work was featured in a number of photoessays for well-known newspapers and magazines, including for Life Magazine. Parks photographed celebrities and fashion models but his best-known works showcased the black experience of the South in the pre-Civil War era. The Gordon Parks Museum is located in Fort Scott. Many of Parks' photos, which brought the reality of Southern racism and black poverty to the public conscious, are exhibited in the museum. The Gordon Parks Museum is situated in the Mercy Health Center, located at the southern edge of Fort Scott just off US Highway 69. Entrance is free. The museum is open daily from 7:00a.m. to 8:00p.m.   620-223-7036
      Rock Creek Lake Waterfalls
      The Rock Creek Lake Waterfalls offer a quiet step into nature. Located just three miles West of Fort Scott, travelers can either hike to the waterfalls from Fort Scott or drive there and leave their car in the park's parking lot that's located on the side of the road. There's a short trail down to the waterfalls from the park where first one, and then a little further on two more, waterfalls spill off from the Rock Creek Lake into the Marmaton River.  When the water is low it's possible to walk across the stream at the bottom waterfall. To access the Rock Creek Waterfalls park, drive out of Fort Scott on 19th Street which soon changes to "Kansas Road" and then again to "195th Street." The park's parking lot is at the north edge of Rock Creek Lake.  Cross the bridge over the dam to reach the waterfalls.
      Lowell Milken Center
      The Lowell Milken Center was established in 2007 as an educational institution which is dedicated to promoting high level scholastic achievements in America's schools. The Center was established when two educators, Norman Conrad and Lowell Milken, decided to collaborate on a concept that would encourage students to create well-researched, high-quality research projects about unsung heroes -- people who had acted in an exceptional manner to benefit mankind but whose efforts had not been recognized. The Center is located on Fort Scott's Main Street. Featured unsung hero subjects include journalists, environmentalists, humanitarians and others.  (620) 223-9991 
      Fort Scott's Good Old Days
      We happened to visit Fort Scott during their annual three-day "Good Old Days" festival which takes place over the course of one weekend every June. The Festival brings fun and good cheer to the town with a crafts fair, rides, a Dock Dogs competition (people bring their dogs and encourage the dogs to jump off a dock into a pool of water as they try to catch a toy in the air.  The dog that jumps the farthest, wins), street dances, carnival food and drinks, live entertainment and more.
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    • 3 months ago
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  • Turin, Italy Turin, Italy

    • From: SaraElizabethTravels
    • Description:

      torino.jpg

      When arriving by plane to Turin, you’ll be landing at the Aeroporto di Torino. Unless you want to take a cab(which would cost about 30-40 euros), the SADAM bus(about 7 euros one-way) is the cheapest way to get to the city center. If you want the get to the center of the city, you’ll get off at the Porta Nuova Railway Station. I studied abroad in Turin for 4 months, so I was very aware of the metro, train and bus schedules. If you plan on staying in Turin for a week or more, it may be smart to get a settimanale(weekly) or mensile(monthly) metro/bus ticket. You can pick one of those up at any Tabaccheria(tobbaco shop), but be mindful, sometimes they don’t carry them. So remember to ask if they know the closest place that sells them. Also, if you find an information booth, get a map! I still used one after months of living there.

            Now in Turin, there are many cafes, pizza places, kebabs, and other various food places. The first pizza place I went to was Primaepoi which is on Via Giovanni Battista Viotti, near Via Roma. This was the first thing I ate when I arrived to Turin and was surprised. The pizza was so fresh, but not in a greasy cheesy way. Everything was perfect, from the vegetables to the crust. Be prepared to eat what you get, because it you ask for a “to go” box, you will get looks from the waiter and everyone around you. “To Go” is a very American thing and you won’t find many places that do it. On that note, I would have to say that my favorite cafe(with “to go” cups) while I was in Turin, was definitely Busters Coffee on Via Cesare Battisti. Before we had wifi in the apartment, I would go there to do my work, blog and get ahold of family and friends through Skype. I would always get a chuckle, cause they would have signs saying “American breakfast/coffee” and as I read it, it reminded me how much more we eat then Europeans do. They would make amazing drinks and I was a fan on their shakes/smoothies. I would be so tempted to get a pastry, because they display it so well! My favorite kebab place was the Casa Del Kebab 12which is across the street from the 8 Gallery Lingotto. I know you didn’t go to Italy to go to the mall, but trust me, you’ll want to check it out. I still regret not buying more from these stores while I was there, because the fashion there is about 2yrs ahead of the US stores. My favorite stores were Cache Cache & Tally Weijl. When I needed groceries(that I couldn’t get at the outside marketplace), I would go to Pam, which was in the mall, but you had to go outside to enter the store. I would always find some awesome deals on poultry, fish and dairy there. While you’re in the area, you should cross the street to experience Eataly. From wheels of cheese to barrels of wine, it was a true Italian experience in one store. I know there are stores in the US now, but I would describe it as the Italian version of Wegmans. Now on the outside of the mall, if you walk towards the parking lot in the back, you’ll be able to see the Olympic Arch of Turin(bottom right corner of the photos). If you have time to cross the bridge, do it. It’s so interesting knowing that amazing athletes walked this bridge and many couples have left their mark on locks on the chain fences. I didn’t have my camera with me when I went over the bridge, but I won’t lie, I was a tad scared. The Olympic village was a ghost town. There was graffiti on the buildings and whenever the wind hit certain parts of the buildings/walkways, it just reminded you of a horror movie. I wish we could find uses to the old Olympic villages, instead of leaving them there to deteriorate. 

            While in Turin, you need to visit Porta Palazzo. If you’re walking down Via Settembre, it’s a straight shot to it. When I lived there I was across the street from a store called Tiger. I think that’s where all my money went towards honestly! It’s just a cute store that’s filled with the most random of things. You could get large packets of loose leaf teas, luggage tags/flying items, cute little toys/games, toiletries, cards, spices, candles, a bottle of champagne and etc. Still hoping we get them in the US soon! So continuing, on you’re way down the street, you’ll go past the busy and store-filled Via Giuseppe Garibaldi. On that street, you can find stores like Promod, Nike, L’Occitane Provence and an amazing gelato place called GROM. Further down, you’ll find yourself in an open space with a church to your right. If you have time, you must visit the Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist. If you haven’t heard about the Holy Shroud, you need to read up and go inside! There’s a replica of the shroud inside the church, but every 5 years or so they display the real one to the public. Continuing down the road, to the left you’ll see a dog park. This was my favorite part of going to the marketplace, because every time I missed my dogs, I would just walk to the park and the dogs would attack me with kisses! Once you hit the end of the grassy park, you turn left and walk down the street until you walk into the market. Now mind you, be very careful about your wallet or purse. There are gypsies and pick-pockets everywhere and there is barely any space for you to walk since it’s so busy. When you first walk in, there’s a walkway near the front where I would get the best prices for onions, carrots & potatoes(1 Euro for 2-3 kilos). Of course I will admit it, girls, if you smile & flirt with the sellers, you get more! Every time I went down to this guy’s booth, he would remember me and automatically knew what I wanted, put it in 2 bags, and gave me a great deal. Remember, you have to go through the whole thing to find the best prices for food. There was also a pizza booth and pastry booth that I went to every other week and both of those people spoke a bit of English. Not going to lie, the pastries were my favorite part! You had to make sure to get there early or all the best ones would be gone. I also bought a few scarves down at the market and still to this day get compliments on them! Now, the marketplace is not open on Sunday mornings because it turns into one big garage sale. From bikes to american dollars, there is a bunch of random stuff for sale. Most of the people here don’t speak Italian, so it’s harder to communicate with them. I was actually able to talk a guy down and bought a twin reflex camera for a good price. The coolest part is that the camera says on the side that it was made in the USSR. It’s my favorite film camera to date!

            Now for the art/music fanatics, you have a good amount of choices. Just walking down the streets, mainly near the piazzas(squares), you’ll hear street musicians and see street entertainers. If you’re interested in seeing some history, you should check out the Museo Egizio(Egypt Museum), Armeria Reale(Royal Armoury), Museo di Antichità(Antiques Museum) & Palazzo Reale di Torino(The Royal Palace of Turin). While I was there, I was able to see a Henri Cartier-Bresson gallery show at thePalazzo Reale. As a photographer, it was a once in a lifetime event(Especially since I got to go to a da Vinci show outside of Turin and saw his original sketches/artwork!). Another museum you need to go to it the Museo Nazionale del Cinema(The National Cinema Museum), which is inside the Mole Antonelliana. Inside you’ll see props, clips from movies, costumes and so on. I think the cutest part is the viewing room that has the multiple toilets as the seating area. At the bottom level, there’s an lift that brings you all the way up to the top of the Mole. It’s scary as heck if you’re afraid of heights, because the lift is transparent, so if you’re scared of height, DO NOT LOOK DOWN! When you exit the lift, you’ll get a 360° view of the city and the Alps. Honestly, it’s totally worth the money, because it was so memorable! The photos I took while up there were unreal. For the music buffs, if you’re around the area during a concert or performance, you should go see one at the Teatro Regio diTorino or the Orchestra Filarmonica di Torino. If you’re there around the end of April/beginning of May, you should check out the Torino Jazz Festival. I got to see Dionne Warwick and she was amazing! Another event to go to(and you would have to look into it) is the Chocolate Festival. All I can say is “Chocolate…..sooooo much chocolate!”. I believe it was near the end of February, but don’t quote me on that. I spent a lot of money on sweets, but there are also lots of freebies! It is truly a chocolate lover’s dream getaway. 

            I hope this helped a bit. I know Turin isn’t as fancy and popular as Florence, Milan or Rome….but it’s worth the trip! If you want more suggestions, you should check out Lonely Planet.com, since that’s how I survived Italy. I would read their book about Italy almost every single night!

      http://www.lonelyplanet.com/italy/liguria-piedmont-and-valle-daosta/turin

       

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  • jeanni@meintl.org

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  • Stokkur Geysir Stokkur Geysir

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
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  • Reykavik Reykavik

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 145
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  • Stokkur Geysir Stokkur Geysir

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 129
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  • Reykavik Reykavik

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 114
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  • Reykavik Reykavik

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 149
    • Not yet rated
  • Reykavik Reykavik

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 114
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  • volcanic rock Landmannalaugar volcanic rock Landmannalaugar Park

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
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  • Mt. Hekla Mt. Hekla

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 116
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  • Mt. Hekla Mt. Hekla

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 77
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  • milk cans waiting for pick yp milk cans waiting for pick yp

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 66
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  • Vik area beach Vik area beach

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 67
    • Not yet rated
  • Vik area beach Vik area beach

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 58
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  • Vik area beach Vik area beach

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 89
    • Not yet rated
  • Vik area beach Vik area beach

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 124
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  • Icelandic horse with Mt Hekla Icelandic horse with Mt Hekla

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 61
    • Not yet rated
  • Icelandic horses Icelandic horses

    • From: DebbieA
    • Description:

      My husband and I visited Iceland for our 25th anniversary in September 2013.  We were lucky to have really nice weather with temperatures in the 50's.  We stayed for 5 days, touring a lot of the Golden Circle sites - Gulfoss Falls and the geysirs.   The highlight of our trip was a day-long jeep tour of Landmannalaugar Park in the highlands.  The scenery was spectacular with amazing waterfalls.  The beach photos are HDR shots and were taken outside of Vik. 


    • 4 months ago
    • Views: 89
    • Not yet rated
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