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17 Search Results for "shinto"

  • Holy Hot Spring in Kagoshima Holy Hot Spring in Kagoshima

    • From: hotspringaddict
    • Description:

      On the island of Sakurajima is a hot spring that is also a Shinto shrine.

    • 2 months ago
    • Views: 76
    • Not yet rated
  • Three reasons why Japan's Izu Three reasons why Japan's Izu Peninsula is the perfect budget getaway

    • From: ataylor0307
    • Description:

      Tokyo in the summertime is surprisingly humid, for a non-tropical region. If you plan to go outside, even to make a dash from your hotel to the train station, in the name of all that is holy don’t leave without a rag or you’ll regret it. Nothing says summer fun like blinking the burning sweat out of your eyes.

      Don’t worry, relief can be found not north, but just a couple hours west, on the Izu Peninsula. If you’re in the Tokyo area, I highly recommend taking a detour there for a couple of days. It’s still hot, but not as humid, and the sea is only a few steps away. In fact one of my best memories of living as an expat in Japan is packing up and taking over a beautiful, Japanese style hostel in the area with a group of friends.

      K’s House Ito OnsenK's House Ito Onsen

      K’s house is a popular hostel chain in Japan. I’ve been to a few, but none have left their mark on me like the one in Ito. Though modern, the interior retains a traditional Japanese aesthetic. Rooms floored in tatami are hidden away by sliding paper screens. A path of cool, smooth stones leads to the kitchen and common room. And best of all, the hostel has its own public and private onsen (hot springs). There’s nothing like taking a long soak in the hot spring after a day at the beach. The feeling of water just this side of boiling on my aching muscles is bliss, and I always come out feeling like putty. The next stop is the common room, which has a big sliding door opening onto a terrace, a peaceful view of the river right below the hostel, and green hills in the distance. Sitting out there after the hot spring, with the sound of the crickets and the breeze on my still steaming skin, is the closest I’ve ever gotten to Zen.

      This place gives the impression of staying at a traditional and expensive Japanese Inn at less than half the price: about $30 USD for a bed in the dorm, or up to $60 USD for a private room ensuite room.

      Shirahama BeachShirahama Beach

      Shirahama beach in Shimoda is a little bit of a journey from Ito, but worth the trip. Besides, the view from the train is gorgeous, and the ride will cost you around $15 USD one way. About an hour long train ride beside lush, green mountains, palm-tree lined roads and sparkling blue sea leads to Izukyu Shimoda station, on the Izukyu line.  From there the bus, which is about $3.50 USD, goes straight to the beach. There’s also a grocery store five minutes’ walk from the station, perfect for getting cheap snacks.   

      Shirahama beach is popular, and it’s easy to see why. In summer the water is warm and clear, with soft rolling waves. The sky is a luminous blue not marred, but enhanced by the white clouds trailing across it. The scenery is as beautiful as any beach in the Caribbean, but at the edge of the beach is a slight cliff. A rocky path leads to the summit and there sits a Shinto shrine, fronted by a red torii, or gate, which stands aloof and proud as if to say, remember, this is Japan.

      Ito Eats

      Within 10 minutes’ walk of the station is a shopping arcade with a few restaurants, including some Izakaya—traditional Japanese restaurants serving many appetizers and cocktails. Izu, so close to the sea, has some of the freshest and tastiest sushi and sashimi you’ll eat in all Japan. It melts in your mouth, and the restaurants in the area serve it up with delicious miso soup, fluffy rice and pickled vegetables. There are also a variety of other foods. The most daring of us tried basashi—raw horse meat. I really like the fried crocodile. Dinner and drinks is no more than $30 USD a person, and often much less, making Ito, and a stay at K’s Hostel, one of my favorite budget getaways.

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 7 months ago
    • Views: 208
    • Not yet rated
  • In Case You Didn't Know... In Case You Didn't Know...

    • From: ErinNorthington
    • Description:

      Directions posted on the bathroom wall at a Shinto Temple in Kyoto, Japan.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 631
    • Not yet rated
  • Meiji Shrine, Tokyo Meiji Shrine, Tokyo

    • From: trcox2
    • Description:

      This beautiful shrine is in the heart of downtown Tokyo, near to the Shibuya commercial district and Yoyogi park.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 1224
    • Not yet rated
  • Shinto Priest Shinto Priest

    • From: dippermouth
    • Description:

      This photo was shot in the ancient city of Kamakura in Japan.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 274
    • Not yet rated
  • The Other Golden Arches The Other Golden Arches

    • From: ErinNorthington
    • Description:

      Fushimiinaritaisya Shrine, a Shinto temple, in Kyoto, Japan

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 359
    • Not yet rated
  • Dragon Festival Dragon Festival

    • From: ErinNorthington
    • Description:

      This was one of many young men and women who took part of a dragon festival in Kyoto, Japan.

    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 159
    • Not yet rated
  • Kyoto, Japan Woman Kyoto, Japan Woman

  • Kyoto A Japanese Treasure Kyoto A Japanese Treasure

    • From: sautry
    • Description:

      Kyoto

      A Japanese Treasure

      Spence Autry

      December 7, 2009

       

      It’s ironic that I chose to write a story about Kyoto, Japan on Pearl Harbor Day but there is a link.  Kyoto was the only major Japanese city not bombed during WWII and remains filled with temples, shrines, imperial palaces and traditional wooden homes.  This plus the fact it is the former capital of Japan and it’s easy to understand why Kyoto is the most historically significant city in Japan. With 1,700 Buddhist temples and 300 Shinto shrines, Kyoto deserves to be on everyone’s “must see” list but it’s what’s not on the tourist maps that makes Kyoto special to me. 

      My wife, Susan, and I visited Kyoto in February of 2007 with our son, Brennan, his wife, Stephanie, and their son, Logen.  Brennan was in the navy and stationed at the Yokosuka Navy Base near Tokyo.  It took us about 6 hours to drive to Kyoto but that was affected by frequent stopping with a two year old. 

      We had our list of top sites to visit in Kyoto and on the first morning we headed for Heian Shrine, the most famous shrine in Kyoto.  With its huge orange Torri gate and orange, green and white buildings, Heian Shrine is also one of Kyoto’s most beautiful sites.  As striking as the buildings are it is the gardens that make this shrine outstanding.  Leaving Heian Shrine we stopped at several smaller shrines before arriving at Kiyomizu Temple, Kyoto’s most famous temple.  Built on a prominent spot at the top of Mt Otowa, Kiyomizu Temple’s main hall is a huge wooden structure with a veranda on the edge of the cliff offering spectacular views over Kyoto. 

      Next we visited Nijo Caste, the home of the Tokugawa shogun.  Built in 1603 it stands in stark contrast to the other shogun castles which were constructed purely for defense.  Nijo Castle is made from native cypress and has delicately carved wooden ceilings and painted shoji screens.  But it is a castle and it is surrounded by a moat and high stone walls.  One last line of defense for the shogun was the so called “nightingale floors” that were installed in the corridors leading to the shogun’s bed chambers.  These special floorboards creaked with an almost melodic tone when trod upon and would warn the shogun if anyone was approaching his chambers. 

      Want to take a walking tour?  Then I would recommend the Philosopher’s Walk.  Named for a philosophy professor who walked this route daily in the early 20th century, the path follows a winding canal north from central Kyoto, past 9 temples and shrines before ending at Ginkaku-ji Temple, the Temple of the Silver Pavilion.  Contrary to its name, it is not silver.  Built as a retirement villa by Shogun Ashikaga Yashimasa in 1482, it was to be covered with silver to imitate the Golden Pavilion built by his grandfather.  He died before he could finish his villa but the wooden buildings are still beautiful.  The whole complex is designed to maximize the enjoyment of the tea ceremony, moon viewing and other aesthetic pursuits. 

      For me the most beautiful site in Kyoto is the Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku-ji.  Built as the retirement villa for the shogun, Yoshimitsu, in the late 1300’s it became a temple when he joined the priesthood at age 37. The three story building is completely covered in gold leaf and glistens in the sunlight.  As we approached the temple clouds rolled in and it began snowing lightly.  Soon the clouds cleared and we were treated to bright sun and blue skies. 

      Our last major shine in Kyoto was one of my favorites.  The Fushimi Inari Shine is located on the outskirts of Kyoto in the sake-making district.  Dedicated to Inari, the fox, the deity of rice and sake, it has a much photographed avenue formed by hundreds of Torri gates. 

      As I said, the tourist sites make Kyoto worth a visit but it’s the things not in the guide books that I found most enjoyable.  Things like the small tea houses with just two or three tables serving tea in the traditional way; old wooden houses with small courtyards planted with colorful azaleas and irises being tended by women in printed, silk, kimonos; small, winding, stone streets lined with open-fronted stores selling paper fans, beautiful pottery, colorful writing paper and delicious looking sweets; geishas walking quickly down the narrow streets hurrying to their appointments; and small restaurants where you are led inside by the aroma of traditional Japanese cooking.  Yes, you can find these things in other areas of Japan but nowhere else does it all come together in an exotic blend that says “I am in Japan”.     

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 662
  • Kyoto - A Japanese Treasure Kyoto - A Japanese Treasure

    • From: sautry
    • Description:

      Kyoto

      A Japanese Treasure

      Spence Autry

      December 7, 2009

       

      It’s ironic that I chose to write a story about Kyoto, Japan on Pearl Harbor Day but there is a link.  Kyoto was the only major Japanese city not bombed during WWII and remains filled with temples, shrines, imperial palaces and traditional wooden homes.  This plus the fact it is the former capital of Japan and it’s easy to understand why Kyoto is the most historically significant city in Japan. With 1,700 Buddhist temples and 300 Shinto shrines, Kyoto deserves to be on everyone’s “must see” list but it’s what’s not on the tourist maps that makes Kyoto special to me. 

      My wife, Susan, and I visited Kyoto in February of 2007 with our son, Brennan, his wife, Stephanie, and their son, Logen.  Brennan was in the navy and stationed at the Yokosuka Navy Base near Tokyo.  It took us about 6 hours to drive to Kyoto but that was affected by frequent stopping with a two year old. 

      We had our list of top sites to visit in Kyoto and on the first morning we headed for Heian Shrine, the most famous shrine in Kyoto.  With its huge orange Torri gate and orange, green and white buildings, Heian Shrine is also one of Kyoto’s most beautiful sites.  As striking as the buildings are it is the gardens that make this shrine outstanding.  Leaving Heian Shrine we stopped at several smaller shrines before arriving at Kiyomizu Temple, Kyoto’s most famous temple.  Built on a prominent spot at the top of Mt Otowa, Kiyomizu Temple’s main hall is a huge wooden structure with a veranda on the edge of the cliff offering spectacular views over Kyoto. 

      Next we visited Nijo Caste, the home of the Tokugawa shogun.  Built in 1603 it stands in stark contrast to the other shogun castles which were constructed purely for defense.  Nijo Castle is made from native cypress and has delicately carved wooden ceilings and painted shoji screens.  But it is a castle and it is surrounded by a moat and high stone walls.  One last line of defense for the shogun was the so called “nightingale floors” that were installed in the corridors leading to the shogun’s bed chambers.  These special floorboards creaked with an almost melodic tone when trod upon and would warn the shogun if anyone was approaching his chambers. 

      Want to take a walking tour?  Then I would recommend the Philosopher’s Walk.  Named for a philosophy professor who walked this route daily in the early 20th century, the path follows a winding canal north from central Kyoto, past 9 temples and shrines before ending at Ginkaku-ji Temple, the Temple of the Silver Pavilion.  Contrary to its name, it is not silver.  Built as a retirement villa by Shogun Ashikaga Yashimasa in 1482, it was to be covered with silver to imitate the Golden Pavilion built by his grandfather.  He died before he could finish his villa but the wooden buildings are still beautiful.  The whole complex is designed to maximize the enjoyment of the tea ceremony, moon viewing and other aesthetic pursuits. 

      For me the most beautiful site in Kyoto is the Golden Pavilion, Kinkaku-ji.  Built as the retirement villa for the shogun, Yoshimitsu, in the late 1300’s it became a temple when he joined the priesthood at age 37. The three story building is completely covered in gold leaf and glistens in the sunlight.  As we approached the temple clouds rolled in and it began snowing lightly.  Soon the clouds cleared and we were treated to bright sun and blue skies. 

      Our last major shine in Kyoto was one of my favorites.  The Fushimi Inari Shine is located on the outskirts of Kyoto in the sake-making district.  Dedicated to Inari, the fox, the deity of rice and sake, it has a much photographed avenue formed by hundreds of Torri gates. 

      As I said, the tourist sites make Kyoto worth a visit but it’s the things not in the guide books that I found most enjoyable.  Things like the small tea houses with just two or three tables serving tea in the traditional way; old wooden houses with small courtyards planted with colorful azaleas and irises being tended by women in printed, silk, kimonos; small, winding, stone streets lined with open-fronted stores selling paper fans, beautiful pottery, colorful writing paper and delicious looking sweets; geishas walking quickly down the narrow streets hurrying to their appointments; and small restaurants where you are led inside by the aroma of traditional Japanese cooking.  Yes, you can find these things in other areas of Japan but nowhere else does it all come together in an exotic blend that says “I am in Japan”.     

       

       

    • Blog post
    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 669
  • Along the Amalfi Coast Along the Amalfi Coast

    • From: jpcool
    • Description:

      Morocco friends was taken at a market high in the Atlas mountains.

       

      The Aztecs come to San Miguel in March and have a colorful religious festival

       

      We were in Hiroshima Japan at a festival and enjoyed the "game" of the Shinto priest trying to scare two very young children into crying...some times both cried and other times they both would just be unaffected.  Never found out the overall rules.

       

      Seem some of the best preserved Greek Temples are in Italy.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 353
  • Aztec festival in San Miguel m Aztec festival in San Miguel mexico

    • From: jpcool
    • Description:

      Morocco friends was taken at a market high in the Atlas mountains.

       

      The Aztecs come to San Miguel in March and have a colorful religious festival

       

      We were in Hiroshima Japan at a festival and enjoyed the "game" of the Shinto priest trying to scare two very young children into crying...some times both cried and other times they both would just be unaffected.  Never found out the overall rules.

       

      Seem some of the best preserved Greek Temples are in Italy.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 616
    • Not yet rated
  • Morocco friends Morocco friends

    • From: jpcool
    • Description:

      Morocco friends was taken at a market high in the Atlas mountains.

       

      The Aztecs come to San Miguel in March and have a colorful religious festival

       

      We were in Hiroshima Japan at a festival and enjoyed the "game" of the Shinto priest trying to scare two very young children into crying...some times both cried and other times they both would just be unaffected.  Never found out the overall rules.

       

      Seem some of the best preserved Greek Temples are in Italy.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 140
    • Not yet rated
  • Japanese game to scare baby Japanese game to scare baby

    • From: jpcool
    • Description:

      Morocco friends was taken at a market high in the Atlas mountains.

       

      The Aztecs come to San Miguel in March and have a colorful religious festival

       

      We were in Hiroshima Japan at a festival and enjoyed the "game" of the Shinto priest trying to scare two very young children into crying...some times both cried and other times they both would just be unaffected.  Never found out the overall rules.

       

      Seem some of the best preserved Greek Temples are in Italy.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 342
  • Beautiful Greek temple in Sici Beautiful Greek temple in Sicilly

    • From: jpcool
    • Description:

      Morocco friends was taken at a market high in the Atlas mountains.

       

      The Aztecs come to San Miguel in March and have a colorful religious festival

       

      We were in Hiroshima Japan at a festival and enjoyed the "game" of the Shinto priest trying to scare two very young children into crying...some times both cried and other times they both would just be unaffected.  Never found out the overall rules.

       

      Seem some of the best preserved Greek Temples are in Italy.

    • 5 years ago
    • Views: 414
    • Not yet rated
  • Golden Pavillion, Kyoto Golden Pavillion, Kyoto

    • From: melissamatsu
    • Description:
      Trip to Japan in June 2008.
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 602
  • Kyoto;Japan's historical capit Kyoto;Japan's historical capital of ancient temples and one Geigin's journey through the old city.

    • From: terrancej
    • Description:

      In 1982, an American traveler from western Michigan boarded a Varig Brazilian airliner to fly from Los Angeles,California to Tokyo, Japan for a two month long visit of discovery. Traveling by train from Tokyo central rail terminal, I rested aboard the Donko ,a slow train to Kyoto. Upon arrival next day in the ancient city of Kyoto, my eyes slowly panned over the dawn's sun light iluminating the Shinto shrines,Buddhist temples and tall pointed pagodas on the hillsides around a traditional preserved city of Nippon. During the two months that I spent exploring the cobbled streets and tiny lanes of that exotic ancient capital, I met and became friendly with many kind hearted people that I still remember even to this day. People really are people and basically good at heart everywhere.

    • Blog post
    • 6 years ago
    • Views: 747
    • Not yet rated
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