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98 Search Results for "tokyo"

  • Three reasons why Japan's Izu Three reasons why Japan's Izu Peninsula is the perfect budget getaway

    • From: ataylor0307
    • Description:

      Tokyo in the summertime is surprisingly humid, for a non-tropical region. If you plan to go outside, even to make a dash from your hotel to the train station, in the name of all that is holy don’t leave without a rag or you’ll regret it. Nothing says summer fun like blinking the burning sweat out of your eyes.

      Don’t worry, relief can be found not north, but just a couple hours west, on the Izu Peninsula. If you’re in the Tokyo area, I highly recommend taking a detour there for a couple of days. It’s still hot, but not as humid, and the sea is only a few steps away. In fact one of my best memories of living as an expat in Japan is packing up and taking over a beautiful, Japanese style hostel in the area with a group of friends.

      K’s House Ito OnsenK's House Ito Onsen

      K’s house is a popular hostel chain in Japan. I’ve been to a few, but none have left their mark on me like the one in Ito. Though modern, the interior retains a traditional Japanese aesthetic. Rooms floored in tatami are hidden away by sliding paper screens. A path of cool, smooth stones leads to the kitchen and common room. And best of all, the hostel has its own public and private onsen (hot springs). There’s nothing like taking a long soak in the hot spring after a day at the beach. The feeling of water just this side of boiling on my aching muscles is bliss, and I always come out feeling like putty. The next stop is the common room, which has a big sliding door opening onto a terrace, a peaceful view of the river right below the hostel, and green hills in the distance. Sitting out there after the hot spring, with the sound of the crickets and the breeze on my still steaming skin, is the closest I’ve ever gotten to Zen.

      This place gives the impression of staying at a traditional and expensive Japanese Inn at less than half the price: about $30 USD for a bed in the dorm, or up to $60 USD for a private room ensuite room.

      Shirahama BeachShirahama Beach

      Shirahama beach in Shimoda is a little bit of a journey from Ito, but worth the trip. Besides, the view from the train is gorgeous, and the ride will cost you around $15 USD one way. About an hour long train ride beside lush, green mountains, palm-tree lined roads and sparkling blue sea leads to Izukyu Shimoda station, on the Izukyu line.  From there the bus, which is about $3.50 USD, goes straight to the beach. There’s also a grocery store five minutes’ walk from the station, perfect for getting cheap snacks.   

      Shirahama beach is popular, and it’s easy to see why. In summer the water is warm and clear, with soft rolling waves. The sky is a luminous blue not marred, but enhanced by the white clouds trailing across it. The scenery is as beautiful as any beach in the Caribbean, but at the edge of the beach is a slight cliff. A rocky path leads to the summit and there sits a Shinto shrine, fronted by a red torii, or gate, which stands aloof and proud as if to say, remember, this is Japan.

      Ito Eats

      Within 10 minutes’ walk of the station is a shopping arcade with a few restaurants, including some Izakaya—traditional Japanese restaurants serving many appetizers and cocktails. Izu, so close to the sea, has some of the freshest and tastiest sushi and sashimi you’ll eat in all Japan. It melts in your mouth, and the restaurants in the area serve it up with delicious miso soup, fluffy rice and pickled vegetables. There are also a variety of other foods. The most daring of us tried basashi—raw horse meat. I really like the fried crocodile. Dinner and drinks is no more than $30 USD a person, and often much less, making Ito, and a stay at K’s Hostel, one of my favorite budget getaways.

       

       

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  • ataylor0307

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  • A short overview of Los Angele A short overview of Los Angeles

    • From: steveven
    • Description:

       

      Los Angeles, often known by its initials L.A., is the most populous city in the U.S. state of California and the second most populous in the United States, and is located in Southern California. The city is the focal point of the larger Los Angeles–Long Beach–Santa Ana metropolitan statistical area and Greater Los Angeles Area region. Los Angeles is also the seat of Los Angeles County, the most populated and one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the United States, while the entire Los Angeles area itself has been recognized as the most diverse of the nation's largest cities. The city's inhabitants are referred to as "Angelenos."

      Culture

      Los Angeles is often billed as the "Creative Capital of the World", due to the fact that one in every six of its residents works in a creative industry. According to the USC Stevens Institute for Innovation, "there are more artists, writers, filmmakers, actors, dancers and musicians living and working in Los Angeles than any other city at any time in the history of civilization."

      LA malls and shopping centers:

      West LA and Beverly Hills, including Beverly Center Shopping Mall, Rodeo Drive, Two Rodeo, Century City Shopping Center and Westside Pavilion.

      Hollywood and nearby, including Hollywood & Highland, Universal CityWalk, Melrose Avenue and Robertson Boulevard Shopping District in West Hollywood.

      Downtown and nearby, including California Market Center, LA Fashion District, Santee Alley, Cooper Design Space, Grand Central Market, LA Flower District, Little Tokyo District, Olvera Street, Citadel Factory Outlet.

      Mid Wilshire and nearby, including The Grove, Original Farmers Market, West Third Street, Koreatown Galleria and Koreatown Plaza.

      South Bay / Redondo Beach, including Del Amo Fashion Center, Manhattan Village Mall, South Bay Galleria, Plaza El Segundo, South Bay Pavilion.

      Los Angeles Nightlife:

      ABH: The Thompson Beverly Hills is a destination on its own accord, but when you consider their rooftop pool at ABH you're left with no reason to not be there right now. The pool provides an intimate and secluded environment for sipping cocktails or taking a dip.

      Poolside cabanas are few and far-between, but incredibly sought after. Luckily, admittance is reserved exclusively for hotel guests and members so the list to get one stays relatively short.

      Apple:  Apple is two-fold, restaurant and entertainment venue. The food comes from the kitchen courtesy of up-and-coming young chef Bryan Ogden, but it is once the plates are cleared that the real fun starts. Over in the Apple Lounge, velvet ropes hold back the average, and only allow the best of the best past.

      Avalon Hollywood: Avalon Hollywood in Los Angeles is a historic night club and music venue that attracts some of the hottest performers and musicians in the business. It houses room for nearly 2,000 people, features the exclusive Bardot lounge on the second floor, and plays host to A-list DJ?s. Avalon Hollywood is one of the top destinations for music and party enthusiasts. The historic Avalon is located right across the street from Los Angeles? Capitol Records Building and attracts hundreds of trendy music lovers. With three bars, opera box seating, and outdoor patio Avalon Hollywood is a popular venue for live concerts, dancing, award shows, film screenings, and private events.

      Today, all the major studios are here and the city is the world's undisputed king of film-making. Disneyland is the city's major attraction, but LA is also home to world-renowned cultural institutions from the Museum of Contemporary Art to the LA Philharmonic and the stunning Getty Museum so just try this weekend a new experience in your life. Book your flights to USA and pack your begs now with http://www.ticketstousa.co.uk.

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    • 2 years ago
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  • Sheaf

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  • Tokyo Garden Koi Tokyo Garden Koi

    • From: peghaz
    • Description:

      The composition for this image was inspired by the oblique views often seen in Japanese prints.

    • 2 years ago
    • Views: 625
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  • Japan - Cherry Blossoms Japan - Cherry Blossoms

    • From: Janelj
    • Description:

      Japanes Gardens - Tokyo, Japan. Locals enjoying the gardens and celebrating the coming of the Cherry Blossoms

    • 2 years ago
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  • Japan - Cherry Blossoms Japan - Cherry Blossoms

    • From: Janelj
    • Description:

      Japanese Gardens - Tokyo, Japan

    • 2 years ago
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  • Japan - Cherry Blossoms Japan - Cherry Blossoms

    • From: Janelj
    • Description:

      Japanese Gardens - Tokyo, Japan

    • 2 years ago
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  • Mount McKinley at sunset Mount McKinley at sunset

    • From: ebloch
    • Description:

      Radio problem on the way from New York to Tokyo caused us to be five hours late because of diversion to Anchorage. Our bonus was a rare clear view of Mt. McKinley from a low altitude and the sun at a great angle.

    • 2 years ago
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  • Almost Japanese :) Almost Japanese :)

    • From: Katkat_82
    • Description:

      Took a trip to Japan. I visited Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka. Along the trip, I rented a kimono and it came out looking like this! Oh the house behind me is Kinkankuji in Kyoto.

    • 3 years ago
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  • My fabulous trip in Japan - To My fabulous trip in Japan - Tokyo, Mt. Fuji, Osaka, Kyoto, Hiroshima

    • From: yasmina
    • Description:

      Japan, both in physical size and global power might be seen as the big brother to Korea, but telling that to a Korean is similar to telling a Scotsman he's English. To the average westerner Japan is probably looked upon as similar to Korea and China but besides eating rice the differences are noticeable. 

      Immediately you are struck at the politeness and accommodation of the Japanese people. Throughout our stay in Japan we experienced great hospitality.

      Tokyo, with a population bigger then that of Delhi, Los Angeles and Beijing combined correctly holds it's reputaton as the great and more expensive city in the world. Taxi's start at 700 Yen (£7; $14; 14,000 won), a meal 1000-1200 yen and a pint of beer around 6-800 yen. However the public transport is superb and in the same manner as Korea, on time to the second. Using the subway (whilst confusing at first) is the best way to see the city, allowing you to see the majority of the city in the two day/nights we were there. The city itself is still recovering from the effects of the Tsunami in March 2011 and still regularly experiences minor after-shocks* with a limit placed on electricity usage at night and the extrememly helpful and normally talkative hostel owner noticeably quietening upon myself asking whether or not Tokyo had fully recovered from the events. Despite this, the famous night-life and shopping Shibuya district located in the west of Tokyo was still swarmed with both people and neon lights on a late August Monday night at 11pm. 

      We had rent an apartment on a vacation rentals website in Japan, even If we didn't found apartment in Korea where we decide to go to hotels.Before leaving Korea we had purchased the JR railway pass (Japan Railways)

       

       Pushing speeds of 300km/h, a journey in a bullet train feels a bit like travelling in a plane, both in appearance and time saved. The journey from city to city (Tokyo>Osaka;Osaka>Hiroshima;Hiroshima>Fukuoka)  took just under 2 hours each. 

      Located between Tokyo and Osaka is Mt. Fuji. The weather was overcast at the time but the mountain can be spotted for miles around and on a clear day the mountain can be seen from Tokyo Tower, 60 miles away. The next three days were spent between Osaka and Kyoto, the two cities close by, separated by a 15-minute train journey. Osaka, big in area but not in attractions can be seen as the opposite to Kyoto, small in size but packed with temples and shrines (both originals and restorations). Once the capital of Japan, Kyoto is one of the few Japanese cities to survive WWII relatively intact and due to this remains a favorite city for many tourists to visit. The city is easy to get around, built in an american grid-like system served by air-conditioned buses much needed on what was an extremely hot and humid day.

       

      After spending the last afternoon in Osaka at the traditional, cultural enhancing Universal Studios it was off to Hiroshima, which along with Nagasaki was subject to the effects of an atomic bomb.

       Here was our trip in this so particular country.

       

      Yasmina

       

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Alleyway restaurants behind Sh Alleyway restaurants behind Shinjuku Station

    • From: ateliercypher
    • Description:

      Alleyway restaurants behind Shinjuku Station. Tokyo, Japan

    • 3 years ago
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  • Some Best Hotels in Paris, Fra Some Best Hotels in Paris, France

    • From: suzain
    • Description:

      Unlike other major world cities, like New York City or Tokyo, Paris has many small, family-owned historic hotels in central locations that you can stay in for under 100€ per night for a double. Below are our six favorite cheap hotels in Paris, France.

      Hotel Chopin:
      Located in one of Paris hidden "passages" or glass-roofed pedestrian shopping arcades, the small, boutique Hotel Chopin is a designated Historical Monument. The 36 rooms are basic, yet comfortable, and decorated in calm yellows, sky blues, and warm melon colors. Each room contains a private bath or shower and a color TV, and are very quiet with no street noise since each room faces the pedestrian arcade. Shop outside at the arcades or stroll 10-minutes to the "Grand Magasins", the world's first large department stores, to shop-unti-you-drop. Spend an elegant evening at the Palais Garnier, the elegant 19th century Opera house, famous for its gilded gold statues and Chagall ceiling a quick 10 minute walk away, or visit the Louvre by metro (10 minutes) or on foot (20 minute walk).

      Hotel Henri IV:
      The family-run Hotel Henri IV offers rock-bottom room rates in one of Paris oldest and priciest residential neighborhoods. Located on the tip of Ile de la Cite, a small island in the Seine, and a few blocks walk to the Notre Dame Cathedral and the Latin Quarter, the Hotel Henri IV overlooks the Place Dauphine, a charming park framed by chestnut trees built in 1608 and named after Henri IV's son, the future King Louis XIII. All 15 rooms overlook the park and range in price from 47€ to 81€ depending on bathroom amenities. On a tight budget, pay 47€ for a single, with in-room sink and shared bathroom in the hallway, or spurge for a double bed with in-room bathroom, shower, and terrace for 74€.

      Mama Shelter:
      Named after the Rolling Stone's anthem, "Gimme Shelter", Mama Shelter is proof that chic and hip does not need to be expensive. Mama Shelter's owners, the family that also owns Club Med Resorts, hired the famous luxury interior designer, Philip Starck, to transform a graffitied, abandoned parking garage near Pere Lachaise cemetery into a rock-n-roll, high-tech hotel with rooms under 100€ per night. For the price of a one-star hotel in central Paris with a common bathroom, you can relax in a modern, light-filled room with high-end linens, free Wi-Fi, iMac computer that you can use to watch TV/DVDs or surf the web, a mini-fridge, and a modern bathroom with Kiel's toiletries. Pop culture touches like funky graffiti quotes in the carpet and hanging face masks of superheroes add a touch of fun to the minimalist design.

      Hungry for snack? Help yourself to the free bread and Nutella in the kitchen, or design your own pizza at the pizzeria. After a day of sightseeing, hang out in the lounge and listen to live music with a crowd of young Parisians or have a creative cocktail in the Island Bar. Take the metro to nearby Paris attractions (15 minute walk to metro), or rent a bike, scooter, or Smart Car onsite at the hotel.

      Hotel Stella:
      A budget traveler's dream, the one-star Hotel Stella has rooms starting at 45€ per night in the pricey St. Germain des Pres area where hotels on the same street cost four times as much. Located around the corner from the one of the largest parks in Paris, the Luxembourg Gardens, and housed in an 18th century building with exposed wooden beams in every room, entering the Hotel Stella is like walking back in time. Rooms are a mix of antique furniture and contain a private bathroom with shower. One room even includes an antique piano. If you are traveling as a family, book the large suite with a double and two single beds.

      Remember that at this price range "you get what you pay for" and you shouldn't expect matching linens, comfy towels, and a spotless atmosphere. What you can expect is a great location with a private bed and bath at a price cheaper than most Paris hostels.

      Hotel Magenta:
      If you are looking to stay in a hip, artsy area of Paris off the tourist track, but close to major attractions, check out the Hotel Magenta one of the best <a href="http://www.myparis.co.uk/">luxury hotel in paris</a>. The cheery purple Hotel Magenta's exterior stands out on a block of gray buildings. The central, five-line Republique station is a short walk away. From here, you'll be whisked to all tourist attractions in Paris in minutes. At night, walk to the trendy restaurants in the Marais district, or the popular clubs and bars on Rue Oberkampf. For a daytime stroll, walk a few blocks to the Canal St. Martin. Starting at 95€, the 65 rooms were remodeled in 2009 and contain modern, wood furnishings, mini-bars, laptop safes, and free Wi-Fi.

      Hotel du College de France:
      The family-owned and operated Hotel du College du France is located in the heart of the historic Latin Quarter, next to the Sorbonne, the oldest University in the world. From the hotel, you can easily walk to the Notre Dame Cathedral, the Cluny Museum of Medieval History, the chic streets of St. Germain des Pres, and the famous rue Moffetard market. The 29 rooms start at 80€ per night and contain ceiling fans for hot evenings and free Wi-Fi. Personal touches such as room service for reasonably-priced drinks 24 hours a day, early check-in and roll-away beds for children are rare in hotels in this price range.

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    • 3 years ago
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  • How to get to and from Japan i How to get to and from Japan in the earthquake/tsunami aftermath?

    • From: vietnamsvisa
    • Description:

      Authorities in Australia and around the world are advising against non-essential travel to Japan. The situation for essential travel is confusing, though, with Tokyo’s main airports congested and difficult to access. We’ve got the lowdown on the current situation, and we’ve put together suggestions (in order of convenience) for ways to get to and from Japan right now.

      The situation in Tokyo

      City centre Tokyo Haneda Airport seems to be more accessible than remote Tokyo Narita, which sits 60 km to the east of Tokyo. Narita’s remote location, damaged railway track, crowded roads and disrupted trains are creating delays and problems for travellers. Leave plenty of time if you’re heading for Narita, and consider the other options outlined below.

      Booking or changing your flight

      Airlines are waiving change fees in the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami, even for tickets that would normally incur a change penalty. Check our full list of airline change fee waiver policies. If your airline doesn’t have seats, check whether they will rebook you on a oneworld or Star Alliance partner airline. Alliance rebooking isn’t part of airlines’ official change offerings at the moment, but it may well be possible in individual cases.

      Qantas passengers may well be able to travel on oneworld partner Japan Airlines (JAL). Singapore Airlines and Air New Zealand travellers could be rebooked on Star Alliance’s Korean Asiana or Japanese ANA All Nippon Airways).

      When looking to book or rebook in unusual circumstances like these, it’s always helpful to be able to present a list of route options to a booking agent. They’ll be busier and more stressed than normal, and may well miss out some options. Bear in mind also that the Shinmoedake volcano on Kyushu, in southern Japan, is currently erupting. Its ash cloud may disrupt flights as airlines route around the plume.

      Here are the next-best options to get to and from Japan right now.

      Japan: Osaka

      Osaka’s Kansai International Airport (KIX) is a good bet for getting into and out of Japan, particularly since it is far enough west to have been undamaged by Friday’s earthquake. Jetstar flies from Cairns, Gold Coast and Sydney to Osaka, while Air New Zealand flies from Auckland.

      Korea: Seoul

      Incheon International Airport in Seoul (ICN) is a major international hub for Korean Air (a SkyTeam airline) and Asiana (a member of the Star Alliance). Both airlines fly to multiple airports within Japan. To connect to or from Australia, both airlines fly to Sydney, and Korean Air also flies to Melbourne and Brisbane. Auckland is also served by Korean Air.

      Taiwan: Taipei

      Taipei’s Taoyuan International Airport (TPE) is a hub for China Airlines and EVA Air. Both airlines fly to Brisbane, and China Airlines also flies to Sydney. In Japan, China Airlines flies to Fukuoka, Hiroshima, Miyazaki, Nagoya, Osaka, Sapporo and Tokyo Narita. Eva Air serves Fukuoka, Komatsu, Nagoya, Osaka, Sapporo, Sendai (closed), and Tokyo Narita. JAL, Delta Airlines and ANA also connect Tokyo Narita with Taipei. JAL also flies to Osaka and Nagoya. Jetstar Asia flies from Osaka to Taipei.

      China: Beijing, Shanghai, Hong Kong

      Connecting in mainland China can be tricky. According to the Chinese Embassy in Canberra’s visa rules, which are aimed at Australian passport holders:

      - You do not need a Transit Visa (G Visa) if your transit in China is less than 24 hours and during which time you will only stay within the airport (However, American and British passports bearers still need visas under this situation).
      - You need to apply for a Transit Visa (G Visa) if your transit is more than 24 hours, or if you have to go out of the airport regardless of the duration of your transit.

      The Embassy also highlights that there is a 48-hour special permit allowing transit between Shanghai’s two main airports, Pudong (PVG) and Hongqiao (SHA):

      - Australian, New Zealand, American, Canadian, South Korean, German, French, Dutch, Luxemburg, Belgian, Portuguese, Spanish, Italian, Austrian, Greek, Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian and Swedish passports bearers do not need a Transit Visa (G Visa) if they transit via SHANGHAI and staying for less than 48 hours (going out of the airport is allowed).

      There is an application process involved so please apply for the Transit Visa only 1 to 2 months before your planned date to enter China.

      As a result of all of these conditions, connecting in Beijing or Shanghai is unlikely be a convenient option for some passengers. Hong Kong is not subject to these mainland Chinese visa restrictions, which means that a connection in Hong Kong’s airport might be easier, even with the additional flight time. Many Chinese airports have flights to Japan. We’ve picked the largest, in order of convenience.

      Hong Kong is connected to many airports in Japan:

      - ANA flies to Osaka and both Tokyo airports.
      - Cathay Pacific flies to Fukuoka, Nagoya, Osaka, Sapporo, and both Tokyo airports.
      - Delta flies to Tokyo Narita.
      - Dragonair flies to Fukuoka and Sendai.
      - Hong Kong Express flies to Osaka, Sapporo and Hakodate.
      - JAL flies to both Tokyo airports.

      From Beijing, many airlines fly to Tokyo’s Narita and Haneda airports, including Air China, ANA, China Eastern, Delta, Japan Airlines and United. Iran Air and Pakistan International Airlines also fly between Beijing and Tokyo to connect back to their home hubs, although ticketing on those airlines may be more difficult.

      Beijing to Osaka services are run by Air China, ANA and China Eastern. Chinese airlines also fly to other airports in Japan, including Fukuoka, Nagoya, Okayama, Sapporo, and the closed Sendai airport, which was hit by the tsunami on Friday.

      Shanghai’s Hongqiao Airport has flights to Tokyo Haneda on ANA, China Eastern, JAL and Shanghai Airlines. Note that there are no connections to Australia from Hongqiao, so a transit across Shanghai to larger Pudong Airport will be needed.

      Shanghai Pudong International Airport is connected to Tokyo Narita by Air China, China Eastern, Delta and JAL. ANA and JAL also fly to Nagoya and Osaka. Shanghai Pudong is also the hub for China Eastern, which flies to Fukuoka, Fukushima, Hiroshima, Kagoshima, Komatsu, Matsuyama, Nagasaki, Nagoya, Naha, Niigata, Okayama and Sapporo.

      Air China flies from Shanghai Pudong to Fukuoka, Nagoya, Osaka and (closed) Sendai, while Shanghai Airlines has flights to Osaka and Toyama.

      Whichever route you take, make sure that you prepare yourself, business colleagues, family and friends before you leave home in case you’re caught up in a disaster.

      Source http://www.vietnamsvisa.com/

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Budding Japanese photographer Budding Japanese photographer

    • From: joe8211943
    • Description:

      I took this photo in 2010 in the Tokyo Tower.

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 478
  • Getting to the Philippines Getting to the Philippines

    • From: tofurkey207
    • Description:

      This fat jerk in front of me is going soooo slowly. hurry up hurry up yes that goes in the bin too YES you have to take your belt off, god you didn't wear socks? sick. People who are not experienced in airport protocol have their own specially reserved circle in hell where they must be frisked by demon TSA officials for all eternity. THANK YOU he's through the line and now its my tur- awesome I have been randomly selected to go through the fancy new body scanner thing. Just this morning on my way to the airport I heard a story about how some TSA guy got caught touching himself while looking at people going through the scanners. Oh well enjoy the view, guy.

      Getting to the Philippines is not the most pleasant experience. To save money I bought the cheapest tickets I could find which resulted in sitting in the middle seat of the middle row between a borderline midget Aussie and a 6ft 5ish? guy with dreads who.. what the hell? brought his own cheesecake? That is something that should not be allowed, now I have to fly for 12 hours straight next to a man enjoying his own cheesecake and not even sharing. 

      Layover in Tokyo I get to wash up in the AMAZING restrooms though Im not sure if it is really all that amazing or just the fact that I spent 12 hours sharing a bathroom with 150 people who seem to just constantly poop. Am I the only person on the plane who is thinking about how much poop we are carrying at the end of the flight.

      Next flight to Manila all of a sudden its like being on a party plane, it is almost midnight local time on a Tuesday and everyone is getting plastered, but as I come to find out this is what the Philippines are all about.

      My brother picks me up at the airport he is easy to pick out and he finds me easily as well, though there are hundreds of people walking around we are both easily a head taller than everyone else. This is my first time in the Philippines and I learn very quickly that staring is 100% encouraged, my brother and I might as well be fucking gorillas.

      We make our way through the crowds and taxis and motorbikes to find the taxi driver my brother paid extra to stay and wait for us, we are heading to a hostel. I am so excited, I made it to Asia I get to see my brother my new nephew and sleep.

      More to come! 

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    • 3 years ago
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  • Narita (Tokyo) Airport Narita (Tokyo) Airport

    • From: joecruz
    • Description:

      Awaiting my JAL flight from Tokyo to Bangkok

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 960
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  • Artful food in Japan Artful food in Japan

    • From: joecruz
    • Description:

      The Japanese greatly admire French cooking, and particularly their pastries and have become their equals in the quality of their desserts.  It's amazing they stay so slim.

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 576
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  • Ingenious Japanese beer dispen Ingenious Japanese beer dispenser

    • From: joecruz
    • Description:

      It tilts the glass at just the right angle as it "pours" the beer and then straightens it just before finishing to end up with the perfect head.  Made in Japan, of course!  This is in the Narita (Tokyo) Airport Admiral's Club.

    • 3 years ago
    • Views: 526
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  • Bathroom Floorplan Bathroom Floorplan

    • From: amsher
    • Description:
    • 4 years ago
    • Views: 246
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