Inspiration

Inspiration

The best cities in the U.S. for foodies and music fans

It’s never too early to start planning your next great vacation. Whether you’re in the mood for an epic national parks road trip this summer or a relaxing staycation closer to home, these nine cities and locales offer some of the best places to enjoy local food and music in the country. If you’re craving a little live music during your travels, these cities definitely deliver, with enough jazz, blues, rock, and country music venues to suit every taste and budget — plus plenty of incredible food to enjoy while you’re in town. New York City With such a diverse population, you really can’t go wrong when it comes to finding a good meal in New York City. Manhattan and Brooklyn’s got heaps of trendy restaurants, though its mom-and-pop diners and eateries, run by families from all over for several generations, are also a major highlight. In Queens, Astoria is known for its Greek, Cypriot, and Brazilian food; Flushing and Bayside for their Chinese, Taiwanese, and Korean restaurants, bakeries, and markets; and Jackson Heights for its Southeast Asian, South American, Mexican, Indian, and Nepali eateries. Head to the Bronx for Italian markets along Arthur Avenue, and a variety of Bengali, Jamaican, Columbian, Guyanese, Trinidadian, Cuban, African, Mexican, and Vietnamese specialty spots. If Italian, Filipino, Mexican, or Sri Lankan cuisine is what you crave, ride the free ferry to Staten Island from Lower Manhattan. While you’re in the Big Apple, catch a Broadway show (stop by the TKTS booth in Times Square to score last-minute discount tickets) or head to a legendary jazz club like Birdland, Blue Note, Bill’s Place, Arthur’s Tavern, or the Village Vanguard for a great night of live music. Boston Seafood is the name of the game in Boston, whether you prefer to hit up local lobster (“lobstah!”) joints for truly mouthwatering lobster rolls and bisque or venture out to Provincetown in Cape Cod for an epic clam bake dinner. Don’t leave without trying Boston baked beans, cream pie, clam chowder (“chowdah!”), lobster mac ‘n cheese, a Fenway Frank, traditional Boston-style pizza, or a cannoli or two from Mike’s Pastry in the North End, which offers 18 delicious flavors to choose from. Courtesy of mikespastry.com For live music, head to Symphony Hall to see the legendary Boston Pops Orchestra perform, House of Blues Boston for Southern dishes with a side of blues, and The Sinclair or The Middle East for performances by local alt-rock, indie, and hip hop musicians. Scullers Jazz Club and Paradise Rock Club are also worth checking out, as are Club Passim and The Beehive, if you’re into jazz, blues, rock, soul, funk, folk, or world music. Nashville Whatever you do in Nashville, it’s bound to be a rollicking good time, especially for night owls who love country music. Join a free line dancing class and kick up your heels at Wildhorse Saloon, then follow the music and hit the honky tonks on and around Broadway — start at Rippy’s, Layla’s, Nudie’s, Honky Tonk Central, Robert’s Western World, Tootsies Orchid Lounge, or The Stage and see where the night takes you. Learn all about the city’s history of country and bluegrass music on a tour of Ryman Auditorium, the original home of the Grand Ole Opry radio show. Nearby, the Country Music Hall of Fame offers guided tours of its Historic RCA Studio B, where Dolly Parton, Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, and Roy Orbison once recorded music. Die-hard fans of the Man in Black should also stop by the Johnny Cash Museum to see its vast memorabilia collection. Courtesy Corsair Distillery After a big day of sightseeing, indulge in some Bar-B-Q at downtown hotspots like Peg Leg Porker, Jack’s Bar-B-Que, or Martin’s Bar-B-Que Joint. Sample locally made spirits — Nelson’s Green Brier Distillery, Nashville Craft Distillery, Ole Smoky, Corsair Distillery, and Pennington Distilling Co. each offer tasting menus — or venture out to Jack Daniel’s Distillery about 90 minutes south in Lynchburg. Memphis Elvis fans, rejoice! Not only is Memphis home to Sun Studio, where Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, and B.B. King, among other rock ‘n’ roll musicians all their recorded music, it’s also where the King made his home at Graceland. Take a tour of the mansion, view collections of his gold and platinum albums and jumpsuits, and check out his legendary pink cadillac. You can also board his luxurious airplanes — decked out with gold-plated seatbelts and sinks — reflect on his life and music in the Meditation Garden, and pay your respects at his grave site. Some of the greatest blues clubs in the U.S. are also in Memphis, including B.B. King’s Blues Club, Rum Boogie Cafe, Blues Hall Juke Joint, Blues City Cafe, and Silky O’Sullivan’s, all located along Beale Street. Visit the Memphis Rock ‘n’ Soul Museum for a closer look at how modern-day rock ‘n’ roll traces its roots back to blues, soul, and gospel music. The Memphis Bar-B-Q scene is also worth digging into, with popular Midtown spots like Central BBQ, Corky’s BBQ, The Rendezvous, Tops Bar-B-Q, Payne’s Bar-B-Q and The Bar-B-Q Shop serving up the good stuff with tangy and tasty wet and dry rubs. New Orleans IStock/joeygil Home to an incredible jazz scene — this is where Louis Armstrong, Wynton Marsalis, Harry Connick, Jr., and countless other jazz greats got started, after all — New Orleans is all about live music, whether you’re seeing a show at a bucket-list destination like Preservation Hall or at a local jazz joint along Frenchmen Street, such as d.b.a., The Spotted Cat, The Blue Nile, Snug Harbor, or the Three Muses. Though a bit more touristy, there are also plenty of live music venues scattered throughout the French Quarter and along Bourbon Street, including Fritzel’s European Jazz Pub, the city’s oldest. When it comes to food in New Orleans, it’s all about Cajun and Creole cuisine — have some gumbo, crawfish étouffée, jambalaya, red beans and rice, a po-boy, a muffaletta sandwich, or dig into a crawfish boil if you can. Treat yourself to bananas foster for dessert or some beignets (fried dough pastries covered in powdered sugar) from Café Du Monde, A New Orleans institution that has been serving them from its French Market coffee stand since 1862. Santa Fe “Red or green?” is the official state question of New Mexico, and one you’re likely to hear a lot during a trip to Santa Fe regarding the type of chile peppers you’d prefer (just say “Christmas” if you want to try both). Head to La Plazuela at La Fonda on the Plaza to sample exquisite New Mexican cuisine featuring traditional recipes with modern twists — the enchiladas and rellenos de la Fonda are a real treat — or its Bell Tower Bar for gorgeous sunset views and swanky rooftop cocktails. Several Santa Fe distilleries also offer behind-the scenes tours and cocktail-making classes if you’re interested in learning more about what makes them so delicious. After dinner, head to Tonic to hear live jazz, Vanessie Restaurant and Piano Bar for more of a traditional piano bar experience, Boxcar for a sports bar and club vibes (on weekends), or check the Santa Fe tourism board’s website to see if there are free festivals, concerts or other cultural performances happening on the Plaza downtown while you’re visiting. Seattle Coffee enthusiasts, rejoice! Start with a visit to the birthplace of Starbucks at Pike Place Market, where the venerable brand got its start back in 1971, then pick up some fresh seasonal fruits and veggies, freshly baked pastries, hot-smoked salmon, and other snacks for a picnic at one of the city’s beautiful parks and gardens. To learn more about coffee-making, book a guided tour of the Starbucks Reserve Roastery, located in the nearby Capitol Hill neighborhood. Finish off a busy day of sightseeing with a beer tasting at Fremont Brewing’s Urban Beer Garden, where you can try seasonal beers and ciders alongside visitors and locals alike. Starbucks Reserve - Seattle /Courtesy starbucksreserve.com Seattle is home to a truly eclectic music scene and is where legendary artists like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Jimi Hendrix, and Macklemore all got their start. For a relaxing jazz-filled evening, visit Jazz Alley downtown or Vito’s in First Hill. Metal fans should stop by Highline or Chop Suey in Capitol Hill, The Crocodile in Belltown, or Funhouse and El Corazón in Eastlake, while those who prefer country music should try Slim’s Last Chance in Georgetown. Portland Not only is Portland, Oregon, home to a burgeoning foodie scene, it’s also where you’ll find some of the best food carts in the U.S., whether you’re craving sushi, banh mi, Somali lamb mandi, tacos, Oaxan specialties, Korean Bar-B-Q, Norwegian fare, Filipino favorites, or spicy chicken, among countless other offerings. If time allows, visit the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, located two hours from downtown Portland and home to several Indigenous communities, for a Native American River-to-Table dining experience featuring freshly caught salmon from the Columbia River. Back in Portland, catch indie, punk rock, psychedelic garage band, and other musical acts at Mississippi Studios in Boise; singer-songwriters, folk pop and hip hop artists at the Doug Fir Lounge downtown; or hit up Holocene for DJ dance parties and techno music. San Francisco and California Wine Country Home to fine seafood restaurants and a beautiful natural landscape dotted with wineries, San Francisco and California Wine Country — located about a 90-minute drive away in Santa Rosa, Napa Valley, Sonoma, and Healdsburg — definitely deserve a spot on your travel bucket list. Fishermans Wharf in San Francisco - IStock/Ben185 Start with freshly caught favorites like lobsters, Dungeness crab, and oysters at one of the posh places along San Francisco’s famous Fisherman’s Wharf, or dig into some delicious Hog Island oysters at a Tomales Bay tasting. For fine wine and a relaxing day at a scenic vineyard, head to Healdsburg — Banshee Wines and Cartograph Wines are popular spots to sip wine by the Russian River — or sample local flavors from family-owned cellars in Sonoma, known for its pinot noir and chardonnay varietals. In Napa Valley, Yountville delivers with 15 tasting rooms and a number of cabernet sauvignon options, while nearby Santa Rosa is known for its Bordeaux. Back in San Francisco, enjoy live jazz music with a side of Ethiopian food at Sheba’s Piano Lounge in the Fillmore District — or pizza at Club Deluxe in the Upper Haight neighborhood — live blues at The Saloon, the city’s oldest bar, or everything from cover bands and DJs to local artists at the Grant and Green Saloon in North Beach. Content sponsored by IntrepidYour North America adventure is right here, right now. Learn more at https://www.intrepidtravel.com Check out more people and planet-friendly adventures at Intrepid Travel:Explore epic national parks of the US

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Bodega Seafood, Art & Wine Festival - Bodega, California

It began as a harmless, ‘what-if’ conversation with my then-husband (fondly referred to as my ‘wasband’ these days), about putting on a festival on a ranch overlooking the ocean. We’d already been producing a very small art and wine festival in a quaint rural community on the Russian River, in Sonoma County California, and had been approached by a local landowner wanting a festival on his property. The ranch owner had offered his land and this opportunity to us at a time in our lives when we were least prepared to accept it. Both of us were craftspeople: Michael was (is) a photographer and I made hand dyed and printed women’s clothing. We both traveled to various places in the country to do art shows, and we're in the final stages of leaving our Sebastopol home to rent a house in Key Largo, Florida for the winter months. We’d each booked nine festivals back there, as there were none during this season close to home. We visited the ranch, we're intrigued by the possibilities, but unsure how we could put on a new festival when we’d be on the East Coast until April, but we gave him a tentative yes. When we hit the road we looked like something out of Grapes of Wrath, Michael’s van towing mine, each loaded to near-explosion with everything we’d need for three months away from home. The endless miles between us and southern Florida opened up a world of conversations. Festival creators Michael and Janet - Courtesy of Janet Ciel “What if we did a seafood festival?” Michael was flipping through a publication called Sunshine Artists, which had hundreds of festivals, fairs, art shows listed, all in the Gulf States. I was driving, or trying to. Towing something this back-heavy meant the front of the van barely touched the ground, making steering this monstrosity akin to maneuvering a bumper car. “I mean, the ranch overlooks the ocean, and there are a ton of seafood festivals in Florida, but there’s nothing quite like this in our area.” I had to admit, it did sound like a good idea. And so it began. Being in Florida we got to see firsthand how some of these events were set up, and found most to be carnival-like. Since our world revolved around artists, we determined this would have to be a high quality event, to draw fine art and craft-vendors and an appreciative crowd, even if it was on a dusty horse ranch. From our little condo in Key Largo we sent solicitations out to all the artists and craftspeople we knew. We reached out to food vendors, wineries, tenting companies, graphics people, and more. By the time we returned in mid-April we found ourselves deep into full-blown festival production, and by the end of August of 1993 the first Bodega BAY Seafood, Art and Wine Festival opened its gates. We had almost eighty artists, several dozen wineries participating in a tasting, a dozen food vendors, including a couple of local seafood restaurants, and excellent entertainment. Courtesy of Bodega Seafood, Art and Wine Festival For ten years we held the event every August on the ranch, located just north of the village of Bodega Bay on Highway 1, a scant two hours from San Francisco and other Bay Area locales. It had horse rental facilities, a bed and breakfast, and ample space for the 7000+ attendees. At times the location was a spectacular asset, when the skies were clear and the views picture-postcard worthy, but more often than not the site was enshrouded in thick fog or had fierce winds, which destroyed artists’ tents and merchandise. Because it was a horse ranch there was a constant pile of horse manure in the parking lot, and an accompanying stench that, though some might have considered charming and rural, vendors and the health department were not so fondly inclined. You might note the word BAY is capitalized in a previous paragraph, and wonder why. It’s because the festival is no longer located in Bodega BAY, but rather in the village of Bodega. Year eleven we were fortunate to find a beautiful ranch inland from our previous location. On Highway 12, or Bodega Highway, Watts Ranch sits across the road from the famous schoolhouse featured in the Alfred Hitchcock classic The Birds, in the teeny village of Bodega, one mile inland and four miles south of our previous site. With a large willow bank to the west blocking the wind, no horses or cows, and generally warmer and more pleasant conditions, the new home for the festival has continued to be the perfect spot for this wonderful event. Yes, Michael is now my ‘wasband,’ but we still produce the festival together. This is year twenty-six for us, and you’ll find similarities to the very first years, but lots of growth as well. Besides attendance having increased over the years we now have more than a hundred fine artists and craftspeople filling the aisles, along with fifteen+ food vendors, featuring all types of food, with an emphasis on seafood. Crabcakes, oysters, calamari, fish tacos, shrimp Louie, and dozens of other dishes are available, along with lots of chicken, meat and vegetarian options and bevy of desserts. Courtesy of Bodega Seafood, Art and Wine Festival/ Margot Duane The Wine, Microbrew and Cider Tasting is a very popular part of the festival, featuring 50+ companies. Customers buy a commemorative glass and 6 tastes (1/3 of a glass). They can buy additional taste tickets for $3 each. They can also buy wine and beer by the bottle/6pack to take home, or beer and wine by the glass, which is available at the Beer/Wine Booth. For those who love to go wine tasting, imagine being able to taste dozens of wines and beers in one location. Three stages of entertainment keep the energy high throughout the weekend. Two stages feature blues, jazz, Latin, Cajun Zydeco, and other excellent music, and the third stage has comedy, magic, juggling and more. We have a large dance floor at the main stage, which is generally filled with joyful dancers. We love families and have wonderful kids’ activities, including interactive exhibits set up by our beneficiary, Stewards of the Coast and Redwoods, the non-profit working in conjunction with the California State Parks in the Russian River region. The festival also benefits the Bodega Volunteer Fire Department, and ours is an event that welcomes (and gives discounts to) firefighters and first responders. Our area has seen its share of fire in recent years, and we’re forever grateful to the men and women who put their safety on the line to protect ours. We’re a scant few miles from the ocean, so the festival is a perfect add-on to a beach adventure. We’re also a ways down the coast from the Russian River, another popular day outing which works nicely paired with a few hours of eating, drinking, dancing and shopping. So Hold Onto Your Halibut! Bodega Seafood, Art & Wine Festival is August 27th and 28th from 10am-6pm on Saturday and 10-5 on Sunday. Watts Ranch is at 16855 Bodega Highway, in Bodega California 94922. More information can be found at www.bodegaseafoodfestival.com. Don’t miss it!

Inspiration

The Best and Worst Cities for Retirees to Visit

We spend years dreaming of life beyond the daily grind, but when retirement finally comes around, the options can be overwhelming! If you’re looking for where to start, the team at Coventry compiled and analyzed data that might be able to help you decide. They ranked the 50 most populous cities in America to find the best cities for retirees to visit. Factors included everything from the average cost of accommodation, transportation, and food and drink, to airfare, entertainment opportunities, and the percentage of the retiree population. Notably, two Florida cities made the top 5 best cities and two made the worst! Here’s what they found: The Best Cities for Retirees to Visit Bayfront Park in Miami - Florida USA / IStock - Working In Media While the majority of the cities in the top 20 list are located in warmer climates year-round, cities like Baltimore, Detroit, Cleveland, Seattle, and a few others make the list. Hopefully, retirees will be visiting in the warmer months, although there are still a lot of things to do in these cities. Baltimore, Philadelphia, Providence, San Diego, and San Francisco all boast a high number of art and theater events. #1 Miami, Florida #2 Tampa, Florida #3 Phoenix, Arizona #4 Cleveland, Ohio #5 Dallas, Texas The Worst Cities for Retirees to Visit Aerial view of Las Vegas strip in Nevada / IStock - f11photo Cost was a big factor when ranking these cities with 6 out of our 8 ranking factors analyzing this metric, so it’s no surprise cities like Las Vegas and New York make the top 10 worst cities for retirees to visit. The accommodation costs alone in Las Vegas are $147 more than the number one spot, Miami. #1 Las Vegas, Nevada #2 Orlando, Florida #3 New York, New York #4 Indianapolis, Indiana #5 Jacksonville, Florida Find the full list and detailed rankings here.

InspirationRoad Trips

6 Hidden Gems to Explore in an RV this Summer

Summer is almost here, and if you’re anything like us, you are counting down the days. Living it up on warm afternoons spent swimming and hiking, then winding down with some good stories around the campfire. Summer is always filled with fun adventures.. that is until you pull up to your campground or hotel and find out you and hundreds of other people had the same idea and will now be fighting for space at the most popular attractions. The secret to an epic summer? Exploring hidden gems with an RV! Leave the crowds and expensive hotel rooms behind this season and try out renting an RV with RVshare! Not only is it the most budget friendly way to hit the road, but having all of the amenities you need along for the ride allows you to create a home just a few steps away from the water, the forest or the mountains. Once you pick up or get your RV delivered, hit the road to explore these hidden gems that offer all sorts of outdoor activities, are all RV friendly (most offer free camping sites!) and don’t include the crowds! Flaming Gorge, Utah / Wyoming Courtesy of RVshare In the southwestern corner of Wyoming or the northeastern corner of Utah, just 3 hours from Salt Lake City, you will find Flaming Gorge and the incredible green river. This is the ultimate summer spot, offering all your favorite water activities like swimming, fishing, boating, white water rafting, kayaking and more. Dreaming of a secluded waterfront spot? Well, you just found it! And if you enjoy being unplugged you can find lots of free RV sites just before the park campgrounds. To enjoy the option of renting boats, campgrounds with hookups and restaurants, we recommend staying in the Utah side of the park. If you are a fan of boondocking and prefer wide open spaces head to the Wyoming side and enjoy! Bighorn National Forest, WY Secluded lakes, flower fields, moose, waterfalls and your RV. Located in the northeastern part of Wyoming, Bighorn National Forest is a true hidden gem. With an abundance of free camping and RV sites you could spend all summer long moving around the many different parts of this forest and still not have enough time to enjoy it all. It offers all the summer outdoor activities you want, from hiking in the backcountry to kayaking in glacier lakes. Plus, with most of the forest being in high altitude you not only avoid crowds but also intense summer heat! Silverton, CO Alpine lakes, incredible hikes, a charming mountain town and a pine forest so special you will want to tell everyone about it. This beautiful slice of Colorado heaven doesn’t get the buzz it should. Located in the southwestern part of the state, Silverton is a place you want to take your RV this summer. On your way you can enjoy some of the most stunning views driving through the “Million Dollar Highway” just make sure to buckle your seatbelt as it can be a bit scary to drive parts of this narrow and curved road. Custer Gallatin National Forest - Beartooth Mountains, Montana If your vision for an epic summer adventure involves wildlife watching, the backcountry and truly being one with nature, then look no further. Montana is known for its incredible landscapes from glacier lakes, to rocky peaks and meadows, Custer National Forest offers all of that without the crowds of the other popular parks in the state. You can set up camp in one of the thousands of free forest sites and call it home for up to 14 days. The perfect paradise for rest, hikes and nature. Arcadia Dunes, Michigan Courtesy of RVshare Ready for an east coast adventure you didn’t even think was possible? Lakes with clear blue water, white sand beaches, cool forests and no crowds. The Arcadia Dunes are part of the Lake Michigan shoreline and promise a stunning location for your summer adventures. Because of how true of a hidden gem this location is, campground options are few, so make sure you book ahead! To make the most of the location check out Hopkins Park Campground. Sisters, Oregon This extremely RV friendly mountain town is a hidden gem waiting for you this summer. Not only do you have easy access to the Three Sisters mountains, but here you are surrounded by trails and forests to help you escape the city life. This spot is particularly great for all those who enjoy biking and mountain biking, there are simply too many good trails around that range, from easy flat loops to more high intensity downhills. Campsites also come in a wide variety, from free sites in the forest to some incredible luxury and themed RV campgrounds in town. All of these incredible hidden gems are waiting for you to make the most out of your summer. As always remember to practice “leave no trace” when camping in forest land, picking up behind you and practicing safe distance while watching wildlife. Now that you know you can rent an RV with RVshare and explore incredible locations without the crowds, all that is left is counting down the days until you leave!

InspirationBudget Travel Lists

7 Things to Do in Anchorage, Alaska

When you think Alaska, does your mind’s eye may immediately conjure the image of a moose? Or an icy blue glacier? Rugged granite peaks topped with snow? Immense brown bears? What you may not realize is that the city of Anchorage and its surrounding area is one place where you can truly “have it all” - and more! Here, an easy and affordable guide to this extraordinary community. Visit the Chugach Range Matt Anderson/Dreamstime One thing you’re certain to notice upon arriving in Anchorage is that the Chugach Mountains seem close enough to touch. Well, almost. Many of the gorgeous range’s trails and access points are a short drive, about 20 minutes, from just about anywhere in the city, meaning you can balance a comfy hotel stay and first-rate restaurant options with a truly wild experience amid the 9,000 square miles of Chugach State Park and Chugach National Forest. Take your pick of hiking, rafting, or simply contemplating the serenity of this virtually untouched natural area. Paddling, cycling, climbing, and even ogling glaciers are all on the Chugach’s menu of options. Spend a few hours, a few days, or an entire week exploring its bounty. (If the Chugach whets your appetite for glaciers, consider a day cruise from nearby Seward or Whittier to see even more.) Explore Alaska History and Culture The Anchorage area has been at the crossroads of Alaska history for centuries. Set aside a day or more to explore the Alaska Native Heritage Center with its introduction to the stories, dances, traditions, and customs of Alaska’s 11 major native cultures. For a taste of Alaska’s history, hop aboard the railroad that helped tame the wilderness. In summer, visitors to Anchorage may choose to continue their Alaska Adventure by embarking on a train trip to Seward, Prince William Sound, Denali, Talkeetna or Fairbanks. But you don’t have to go too far to savor the joy of train travel - the Glacier Discovery train is a beautiful day trip to nearby Spencer. Explore Alaska’s Mining History Hands-On Kids of all ages will love playing prospector at a hands-on mining destination such as Indian Valley or Crow Creek. These spots combine a museum experience, complete with authentic mining tools, with entertaining history lessons about the great gold rush that once attracted people from all over the world with dreams of striking it rich. Best of all, visitors learn the basics of panning for gold and take home more than just memories. Go Cycling on the Coastal Trail Anchorage is one of the most bike-friendly cities in America, with 135 miles of cycling paths. The one you especially won’t want to miss is the paved 11-mile Tony Knowles Coastal Trail, where you can rent a bike and explore Anchorage’s Cook Inlet all the way from downtown to Kincaid Park, including marshes, hills, and patches of forest. Keep an eye out for bald eagles, moose, and other local denizens. Visit One of America’s Best Museums Sure, you come to Anchorage for the natural beauty, but we bet you didn’t know that the city is also home to an incredible museum devoted to the entire Alaska experience. The Anchorage Museum is the biggest museum in the state and it immerses visitors in human history and the arts, natural history, and much more. A walk through the museum is a bit like experiencing a guidebook sprung into three-dimensions, a unique way of appreciating this unique state from its earliest days to its vibrant present. Look for Wildlife Anchorage is home to more than 1,000 moose. (We’re guessing your hometown isn’t.) The majestically awkward-looking giants can be spotted in almost any green space in Anchorage if you spend enough time outdoors, and you can always count on seeing one at the Alaska Wildlife Conservation Center. It takes a little more effort to spot whales here, but they are also abundant. Belugas, the friendly looking white whales that can be as long as a minivan, can be seen on a trip down Turnagain Arm. Alaska is also the only place in America where black bears, brown bears, and polar bears abound. Head out of Anchorage for the rivers and streams of Katmai National Park to see bears feasting on salmon. Surf the Bore Tide Courtesy of Alaska.org - Credit: Jeff Schultz Tides in Anchorage are extreme, with some of the highest tides in the world. The shallow, narrow waters of Turnagain Arm help form a bore tide, a wave up to 6 feet tall that rolls for miles along the inlet. The Seward Highway is dotted with good vantage points to watch this natural phenomenon, and perhaps even spot the intrepid surfers who seek to ride the wave. Content presented by IntrepidYour North America adventure is right here, right now. Learn more at https://www.intrepidtravel.com Check out more people and planet-friendly adventures at Intrepid Travel:Explore epic national parks of the US

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InspirationNational Parks

History beckons in Washington County, Maryland, home to Civil War battlefields

Western Maryland is home to some of the most beautiful places to go hiking in the eastern U.S., as well as three scenic byways — the Maryland Historic National Road Scenic Byway, The Chesapeake & Ohio (C&O) Canal Scenic Byway, and The Antietam Campaign Scenic Byway — all of which make terrific options for your next great summer road trip. In Washington County, you’ll find everything from historic homes and forts dating back to the early 18th century to battlefields and cemeteries telling the stories of those who helped change the course of the Civil War. Here’s where every history buff should visit on their next trip to this fascinating corner of the country. Historic Civil War Battlefields Antietam National Battlefield - Courtesy of nps.gov Perhaps the most well-known historic site in Western Maryland, Antietam National Battlefield is where the bloodiest single-day battle in American history took place, with 23,000 soldiers losing their lives or wounded that fateful day on September 17, 1862. Along with Union victories at nearby Monocacy National Battlefield and South Mountain State Battlefield, the fighting helped turn the tide of the Civil War and led Lincoln to issue his Emancipation Proclamation, which happened a few days later on September 22, 1862. While a number of events will be held over the weekend of September 17, 2022, to mark the 160th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam (check the website) you can learn more about its significance and those who died there at the Newcomer House visitor center and pay your respects at the nearby Antietam National Cemetery. Stop by the Pry House Field Hospital Museum for a look at Civil War medicine, or for a unique take on the battle, hit the Antietam Creek Water Trail to visit a number of key sites by kayak or canoe. Located just outside Boonsboro, South Mountain State Battlefield marks the site of Maryland’s first Civil War battle, which ended in a Union victory and essentially prevented a Confederate invasion. About 15 minutes away, pay your respects to the many journalists and artists killed while covering the Civil War at the War Correspondents Memorial Arch in Gathland State Park, built by George Alfred Townsend, himself a Civil War correspondent, in 1896. Sites Dating Back to the Early 18th and 19th Centuries Fort Frederick Living History - Credit Visit Hagerstown Nestled along the Potomac River and built in 1756 to protect early settlers during and after the French and Indian War, Fort Frederick was also used to hold British prisoners during the Revolutionary War. By 1860, the farmland that now makes up Fort Frederick State Park was owned by Nathan Williams, the second-richest free African American man in all of Washington County, who continued to grow and sell crops to both armies during the Civil War, all while helping slaves to escape through this part of Maryland. Learn more about the fort’s fascinating past, then stroll one of its scenic nature trails. For a change in scenery and the chance to take on some of the area’s scenic hikes including a small section of the legendary Appalachian Trail, head to Washington Monument State Park. In 1827, Boonsboro residents constructed a massive 30-foot tall stone tower — the first-ever Washington Monument — in honor of our first president. Hike to check it out in person, then stop by the museum for more background information about its role in local history. Learn more about Hagerstown’s German immigrant founder at the Jonathan Hager House Museum, where you can tour the home he constructed in 1739. What began as “Hager’s Fancy,” a frontier fort at the western edge of the Maryland colony that later served as a trading post, was purchased by the Washington County Historical Society in 1944 and opened as a museum in 1962. Today, you can visit the historic home and view its furnishings, preserved as they were during the property’s 18th-century heyday. Black History Sites in Washington County While slavery did play a significant part in the region’s history from the early 18th century until Maryland abolished it in 1864, Hagerstown is home to several Underground Railroad sites you can visit today. Read the historic markers along Jonathan Street to learn about the legacy of African Americans who helped put Hagerstown on the map, like Walter Harmon, a wealthy entrepreneur who built 37 houses, a bowling alley, a dance hall, and the Harmon Hotel, highlighted in The Green Book as one of the only accommodations open to Black travelers during segregation. It also happens to be where baseball legend and Hall of Famer Willie Mays stayed in 1950 when he played his first professional game with the Trenton Giants at Municipal Stadium. Kennedy Farm House John Brown HQ - Credit: Visit Hagerstown Closer to Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, the Kennedy Farm was the staging area for abolitionist John Brown’s 1859 raid on the federal arsenal in Harper’s Ferry. Meant to help create a republic for fugitive slaves, the raid went on for three days but was ultimately unsuccessful. His followers, a mix of Black and white abolitionists, were captured or killed, while Brown himself was tried for treason and hanged a few months later. It did, however, instill a sense of fierce conflict between northerners and southerners regarding the practice of slavery that only intensified over the next two years until the start of the Civil War. Today, the John Brown Raid Headquarters is a National Historic Landmark, though it’s temporarily closed for restoration. Also worth a look are two of Hagerstown’s oldest African American churches, the Asbury United Methodist Church, founded in 1818 (its current building dates to 1879, as it was rebuilt after a fire), and the Ebenezer African Methodist Episcopal Church, founded in 1840. For more information about the region’s rich African American history and culture, head to the Doleman Black Heritage Museum, which houses a vast collection of photos, books, birth records, deeds of slave sales, paintings, sculptures, and other artifacts from the 19th and 20th centuries. CARD WIDGET HERE

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An American Railroad Re-Awakens in Pennsylvania

An American, and certainly a Pennsylvanian, historical experience and adventure is about to awaken after years of hibernation. The East Broad Top Railroad (EBT) located in Orbisonia, PA and nestled in the rolling hills and farmlands in the central part of the state will start up train rides and historic railroad shop tours on May 6. The 150-year-old railroad is considered by the Smithsonian to be one of the best preserved examples of 19th century American narrow gauge railroads (the rails less than 4 feet apart so the trains, and everything is smaller than "standard" railroads) and industrial complexes in the country. It was already an antique when it was shut down in 1955; today is it a true treasure that far exceeds the trains and tracks. The EBT still has six narrow-gauge steam locomotives, each awaiting their turn for restoration, one of which is expected in the near future. Malkiewicz TrainStation - Courtesy The East Broad Top Railroad The East Broad Top is famous for being an authentic antique all steam engine railroad when it was shuttered in 1955, escaping the scrappers torch (the owner of the scrap company actually saved the entire railroad) and slumbering, running semi-regulary with steam engines (which are rumored to be back this year) and watched over, protected and preserved by "friends," railfans, and the community. This historical treasure was well guarded, preserved and kept safe for 70 years. In 2020 the non-for-profit EBT Foundation was formed and embarked on the ambitious plan to restore most of the entire line and inject funding and resources into the mountain-pass communities. Adjacent to the East Broad Top is the Rockhill Trolley Museum offering a significant collection of operating streetcars and trolleys from around the U.S. and the world. Malkiewicz TrolleyRide - Courtesy The East Broad Top Railroad So, if you are looking to discover a true treasure, a historical and adventure experience in a landscape less touched by the rushing, worried world, take a short train ride big on history and discovery on the East Broad Top before everyone else finds it. From May 6 through the end of the year, the renaissance of the East Broad Top can be experienced on a one-hour train ride in a vintage caboose, passenger car or even an open-air car. While the rail line is 30 plus miles long, trains in 2022 will travel on a nine-mile round-trip ride from the historic roundhouse and shops in Orbisonia to Colgate Grove and back. Prices begin at $20 for adults and $18 for children. Visit www.eastbroadtop.com for reservations and information.